117 reputation
8
bio website propertylogic.net
location Kettering, United Kingdom
age 22
visits member for 2 years, 4 months
seen Jul 8 at 15:11

Career

  • Freelance developer for 2 years (age 14-16)
  • Creative developer at Webforma Studios Ltd for 3 years (age 16-19)
  • Developer at Property Logic (19-20)
  • Developer at New Edge Media (19-Present) .

Mar
24
awarded  Popular Question
Nov
20
awarded  Commentator
Nov
20
comment “I couldn't but laugh” - correct or not?
@Man_From_India none of the question states I couldn't laugh - are you getting it confused with I couldn't NOT laugh?
Nov
20
comment “I couldn't but laugh” - correct or not?
@TimLymington are you sure? I couldn't help but laugh to me means exactly what Daniel Harbour said in his answer - I could not help laughing.
Nov
20
asked “I couldn't but laugh” - correct or not?
Mar
8
comment Pronunciation of “lorry”, “worry” and “sorry”
@jwpat7 Cardiff?
Mar
7
awarded  Student
Mar
6
comment Pronunciation of “lorry”, “worry” and “sorry”
@CarlSmith still doesn't rhyme with lorry
Jan
11
comment 'Do you know where I'm coming from?'
"get what I'm saying" and "see what I'm saying" (more common than "hear what I'm saying", but also "you get me" and "you hear me") are very common
Oct
26
comment Pronunciation of “lorry”, “worry” and “sorry”
Adequate answer to my question. Sort of like wan should sound like man, but instead makes a won sound (wanted)... except in other cases such as a widely used swearword with the same first three letters (can't think of any other examples). My argument for using "lurry" has always been worry is the same spelling yet different sound... I guess this eliminates that defense.
Oct
26
awarded  Scholar
Oct
26
accepted Pronunciation of “lorry”, “worry” and “sorry”
Oct
26
comment Pronunciation of “lorry”, “worry” and “sorry”
@AndrewLeach - I am, in fact, from Manchester, so you could be very much correct
Oct
26
asked Pronunciation of “lorry”, “worry” and “sorry”
May
31
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Apr
11
awarded  Supporter
Apr
11
awarded  Editor
Apr
11
comment How to divide words into syllables?
True, my class may not be applicable (however @DavidSchwartz makes a good point). How about my example of "recent"?
Apr
11
revised How to divide words into syllables?
the question
Apr
11
asked How to divide words into syllables?