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seen Jan 28 at 17:18

Jan
28
comment Missing reflexive when there's a preposition
Thanks a lot. I'd accept it but I kind of don't want to take away the "accept" from TRomano. So the up-vote will have to be enough :). Thanks for the link btw.
Jan
28
comment Missing reflexive when there's a preposition
Nice answer. However, there's one thing that bugs me. The claim that a locational PP is out of the domain of a sentence seems a bit arbitrary. Why is that? And more importantly, does that also hold for verbs to which the PP is pretty much a necessary part of the predicate. Like "I went to the mall". Does "to the mall" not belong to the domain (whatever that is)? If no, is there any reason other than random definition?
Jan
28
comment Missing reflexive when there's a preposition
@Araucaria... I think in the last sentence you meant grammati...oh wait, I got it.
Jan
28
accepted Missing reflexive when there's a preposition
Jan
28
accepted fun - part of speech
Jan
27
comment fun - part of speech
@tchrist... no I actually don't see it. I see it in class though. It's correct that it doesn't matter for a native speaker but reducing it to a problem of a translator does ignore the very fact that there are languages that clearly mark which is which and that are very strict about the distinction. Anyway, we've both made our points and we clearly won't agree with each other so let's agree to disagree.
Jan
27
comment fun - part of speech
@tchrist... well, I cannot fully agree because not knowing whether the "ban" you're looking at is a noun or a verb will make it impossible for you to find the right word in another language because English is very special in it's flexibility. In most languages you'll have two distinct words for that. And "ban" is not the only example. There are hundred of those. If you use the noun where you should have used the verb you'll most likely not be understood. Just imagine I was to say "During I was in school"... it's wrong. Knowing what a preposition and a conjunction would have prevented that.
Jan
27
comment fun - part of speech
I used "indifferent" because I find that many English speakers have no idea what part of speech their dealing with. It doesn't seem to matter to them whether something is a verb or a noun. I have been a German teacher for more than 5 years and I'm always surprised about this. But given the flexibility it does make sense.
Jan
27
comment Missing reflexive when there's a preposition
To be fair though, the ngram cannot really be taken at face value as probably more than two third of the results will be "proper" oblique pronouns as in "He throw the book behind her." However, the difference between "behind him" and "behind himself" is a factor of 200 which is quite convincing.
Jan
27
comment Missing reflexive when there's a preposition
Here's another search result I found while I was trying to find something false about the other answer: google.de/…
Jan
27
comment Missing reflexive when there's a preposition
Here's the link google.de/… Logically speaking all these should be "myself". So, do the rules only apply to third person?
Jan
27
comment Missing reflexive when there's a preposition
First of, thanks for your answer!! I've ran a few Google searches for phrases like "he * behind him". Since the results of those are a mix of correct and "false" obliques I then tried "I * behind me". That gives a whole lot of results. Among the main hits is a famous folk song so I excluded the word "girl" from the search. Still a lot of results, some from the King James Bible. That suggests that not using the reflexive is not a result of sloppy modern day colloquial speech. Finally I looked for "I looked behind me" on Google Books and got 107.000 hits.
Jan
27
comment Missing reflexive when there's a preposition
@JonathanSpirit... but wouldn't that mean that I can say "She washes her." and rely on context to clear up the rest? Why is the reflexive mandatory here but not in the other case?
Jan
27
asked Missing reflexive when there's a preposition
Jan
27
asked fun - part of speech
Jan
27
accepted Weird “genitive of relative pronoun” construction
Jan
26
comment Weird “genitive of relative pronoun” construction
Why doesn't anyone write an answer :)... I can't accept comments
Jan
26
answered An adjective for gestalt
Jan
26
comment Weird “genitive of relative pronoun” construction
@GEdgar... just thought how I'd do it in German and that lead me to "the present tense of which I have already discussed"
Jan
26
asked Weird “genitive of relative pronoun” construction