658 reputation
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bio website german-is-easy.com
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visits member for 2 years
seen Apr 7 at 1:06

Apr
9
awarded  Yearling
Apr
7
accepted Example for “so” as a subordinating conjunction
Apr
3
comment Less colloquial term for “zoom in”
"Let's now have a closer look" seems to be just the right balance between of informal and proper English. I wonder why this answer didn't get more upvotes, especially considering the particular use-case described by OP. +5 if I could.
Apr
2
comment Coughing captured in writing
It is, but examples like "to sneeze" and "to giggle" show that there my be a verb and still a second, imitation-only word as well (atchoo, hehe).
Apr
2
comment Coughing captured in writing
@FumbleFingers... not necessarily. My first question has a clear answer so it seems (no, there isn't one). As for the second one... depending on what the sound is there might be a commonly accepted term. I recently learned "sad trombone" to be one of those. I was wondering, if there was something similar for coughing. The fact that you think it is opinion based hints at that there isn't a common way, so this would be a fine answer to the second part. In essence it's "No and you cannot". I don't see why this would be close worthy
Apr
2
comment Onomatopoeia for throat clearing
@JohnLawler... so you're saying that "ahem" is not an attempt to imitate sound? What is it then? I think, it may not be a very successful o. but it is one all the same. As is "to cough" by the way
Apr
2
asked Coughing captured in writing
Apr
2
comment Onomatopoeia for throat clearing
@JohnLawler... but isn't it the attempt that makes it onomatopoetic? I mean how good or bad it is is largely up to the person, considering that the onomatopoeia for a certain sound can vary quite a lot from language to language
Apr
2
accepted Onomatopoeia for throat clearing
Apr
2
comment “Me neither” - why oblique case?
@Ronan Yes. Thank you.
Apr
2
asked Onomatopoeia for throat clearing
Apr
2
comment “Me neither” - why oblique case?
@Ronan ... at which point of the shortening exactly does "I" turn to "me". Your suggestion is just a different phrasing. Here's an example for a shortened sentence: "Hungry?"... is short for "Are you hungry?"
Apr
2
asked “Me neither” - why oblique case?
Mar
26
awarded  Popular Question
Mar
26
awarded  Nice Question
Mar
25
accepted Fail trumpet onomatopoeia
Mar
25
comment Fail trumpet onomatopoeia
Perfect... I was trying all kinds of "wua, ua, wue" on Youtube and I couldn't find anything :)
Mar
25
asked Fail trumpet onomatopoeia
Mar
21
comment “if” used to introduce facts
Yeah, that is a very good example, in fact. It was something like that and it was by a British writer from the 80s... so you'd say it is not "fancy English" but rather "colloquial English"?
Mar
21
comment “if” used to introduce facts
Just for curiosity... why is there a downvote here? It seems like you get at least one by default, just for asking something.