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2d
accepted Mnemonic for parallel
2d
comment Mnemonic for parallel
@painfulenglish... oddly enough that is actually very helpful :)
Nov
20
comment Mnemonic for parallel
@Josh61, two "ll" at the end would be parallel, too. And two pairs of "l" would be even more paralleler. But thanks, at least that helps remember that there is at least one pair of "l". And thanks for the link!
Nov
20
asked Mnemonic for parallel
Oct
14
awarded  Famous Question
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
May
19
comment Are words like “freaking” and “flippin'” adverbs or adjectives when used like this?
@EdwinAshworth... why don't you make those 3 comments into an answer. I'd probably accept it.
May
19
comment Are words like “freaking” and “flippin'” adverbs or adjectives when used like this?
@Kris.. any literature backup? Because without it I cannot agree that there is no semantic difference. "Barking" is what the dog does, "freaking" is "flippin'" is what I think about the discussion.
May
19
comment Are words like “freaking” and “flippin'” adverbs or adjectives when used like this?
Thanks for our answer. I suppose that there must be some consenus as to what "god damn" or "freaking" in front of a noun is. I was more interested in that, than in how much sense it makes. Do you have any literature or anything?
May
19
asked Are words like “freaking” and “flippin'” adverbs or adjectives when used like this?
Apr
25
accepted Perfect of modal “to have to” in infinitive-clause
Apr
24
comment Perfect of modal “to have to” in infinitive-clause
@PeterShor... if you were to make your comments into an answer I'd gladly accept it as correct
Apr
23
comment Perfect of modal “to have to” in infinitive-clause
@PeterShor... thanks so far. It doesn't really matter in my case whether it is idiomatic or not. What I want to know is if it is technically correct. The context you suggested works fine. So... is it grammatical ?
Apr
23
asked Perfect of modal “to have to” in infinitive-clause
Apr
9
awarded  Yearling
Apr
7
accepted Example for “so” as a subordinating conjunction
Apr
3
comment Less colloquial term for “zoom in”
"Let's now have a closer look" seems to be just the right balance between of informal and proper English. I wonder why this answer didn't get more upvotes, especially considering the particular use-case described by OP. +5 if I could.
Apr
2
comment Coughing captured in writing
It is, but examples like "to sneeze" and "to giggle" show that there my be a verb and still a second, imitation-only word as well (atchoo, hehe).
Apr
2
comment Coughing captured in writing
@FumbleFingers... not necessarily. My first question has a clear answer so it seems (no, there isn't one). As for the second one... depending on what the sound is there might be a commonly accepted term. I recently learned "sad trombone" to be one of those. I was wondering, if there was something similar for coughing. The fact that you think it is opinion based hints at that there isn't a common way, so this would be a fine answer to the second part. In essence it's "No and you cannot". I don't see why this would be close worthy
Apr
2
comment Onomatopoeia for throat clearing
@JohnLawler... so you're saying that "ahem" is not an attempt to imitate sound? What is it then? I think, it may not be a very successful o. but it is one all the same. As is "to cough" by the way