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comment Formal saxon genitive usage
do you mean to say that I should check the usage of a plural form when the sentence starts with a singular noun? I know about it, thank you. No, what sounds haughty is your last sentence in the first comment. I surely could have read the whole answer with greater care, still making a mistake is something which may occur even to the best. For example, one may write "especially" with one "l" only, but that is clearly a typo.
Aug
21
comment Formal saxon genitive usage
I surely apologize for wrongly assuming a spelling mistake. It's the first time I've ever heard such an expression, even in its Latin form, and I can assure you that Latin expressions are frequently used in Italian, as they are normally easy to grasp. And in the end, there's no need to sound haughty in one's remarks.
Aug
21
revised Formal saxon genitive usage
my mistake in assuming a spelling error
Aug
21
revised Formal saxon genitive usage
spelling
Aug
21
answered Formal saxon genitive usage
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19
revised Are there any practices to use onomatopoeia in English for describing the degree of joyfulness / funniness by laughter and sorrow by crying?
spelling mistake
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answered Meaning of the phrase “I could tell”
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comment “At least one” - singular or plural subject?
I agree with @Bradd Szonye about Ngrams (which I don't like), but this question is absolutely too basic for this forum, as there is no doubt that the subject of the sentence is "one"; the title is ill-suited, "at least" is not at stake here, it could be "at least some of them", "at least two of them" and it would make all the difference in the world.
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comment Unorthodox article placement
Although I haven't had the chance of playing grammar games with a native speaker while growing up, I am under the impression that your example is not grammatically correct. As far as I know, the only correct construct is the first cited by the OP, even when the sentence is followed by another clause introduced by "that".
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comment Slash in the years
I don't think this is what the poster meant. In Europe we frequently use the slash to separate two different years, so I suppose he meant the years 2000 and 2001, and the years 2001 and 2002. This is the way school years are indicated, for example, as they do not start in January and extend over the months of two different years. Besides, the habit of indicating months after years is typically American but not much understood elsewhere.
Mar
27
comment Can we use future continuous in the following sentence?
I'd say "In the future, please let us know in due time if there are any issues. This is the last time I'll remind you about/of this."