131 reputation
4
bio website
location Akron, OH
age 57
visits member for 4 years, 2 months
seen 18 hours ago

I yearn to be Bugs.

I suspect I am Daffy.

I look like Elmer!


Dec
18
answered Word for metallic “dust”?
Nov
24
comment What is the American word for 'tea-towel'?
@Drew: is that an actual quote from somewhere..? (Which, oddly enough, Google Translate translates as "Do not mix apples and oranges", but even me with my 40+-year-old schoolboy French knew that "serviette" had nothing to do with fruit :-)
Nov
20
comment Silent letters in English
One minor point: back in the day all those trailing 'e's (as in 'more', 'those', 'case', 'cause', and so on) were pronounced. So if I understand it correctly "more" was pronounced something like "maw-reh", "those" would have been similar to "thaw-seh", etc.
Sep
28
answered Shoplifting vs. a word for “someone who orders, eats and sneaks without paying the check”
Sep
20
comment “Quyer” When and why did the spelling change so drastically?
Also note that the modern definitions of quire relate generally to pieces of paper or parchment: 1) four sheets of paper or parchment folded to form eight leaves, as in medieval manuscripts. 2) any collection of leaves one within another in a manuscript or book. 3) 25 (formerly 24) sheets of paper; one twentieth of a ream. In my experience the third definition is the one I've seen most commonly.
Sep
17
comment In the word “Scent”, is the S or the C silent?
sceptic versus skeptic - despite being a native mumbler of the American language (such as it is :-}) even I shudder in horror at skeptic. That's Just SO Wrong!
Sep
16
comment Why is “cupboard” pronounced with a silent “p”?
@tchrist - my whole life I've pronounced "background" as two words - "back ground" - as in "back ground check". Ditto for "post doc" (a medical practitioner who specializes in treating wooden or steel posts), and "last ditch" (the final drainage channel). YMMV.
Sep
5
comment Two crows being an attempted murder
If a "group" of crows is a murder, then wouldn't two crows be a manslaughter? :-)
Aug
28
comment In the word “Scent”, is the S or the C silent?
From the Online Etymology Dictionary - "late 14c., sent "to find the scent of," from Old French sentir "to feel, smell, touch, taste; realize, perceive; make love to," from Latin sentire " to feel, perceive, sense, discern, hear, see" (see sense (n.)). Originally a hunting term. The -c- appeared 17c., perhaps by influence of ascent, descent, etc., or by influence of science". So, although my first comment is funnier, it would appear that the -c- is silent.
Aug
28
comment In the word “Scent”, is the S or the C silent?
Neither. They're both pronounced.
Jul
26
comment What is meant by “same difference”?
@EdwinAshworth - this phrase was used in the American mid-west at about the same time. And still is, come to think of it...
Jun
30
comment “Soccer mom”: why soccer?
@DigitalChris - interestingly, the term "soccer" is actually a Britishism, derived from the word "association" in "association football" which is the proper name of the game (as opposed to e.g. "rugby football" and "American football"). So now you know...
Jun
4
comment Alternative to “a bunch”?
I wonder if it's more of an east coast/west coast thing. Here in Ohio (about 25 miles south of the southernmost of the lakes referred to as "a bunch of water!") we (or at least I :-) tend to use "a lot" more than "a bunch". As in "That's a lot of water down there, eh, Josiah?", or perhaps "a whole lot", i.e. "You're right there, Obadiah - that's a WHOLE lot of water down there!". An' I expect you don't even know that we happen to produce some partic'ly fine wines which are getting more sophisticated and cosmopolitan by the day, and are a delight to the sophisticated palate - yew barstud?
May
28
comment What metaphor or phrase can describe an object that is aesthetically pleasing yet totally useless?
"Aesthetically pleasing" is in the eye of the beholder. Aunt Amelia might find her collection of floppy-eared bunny statuary (in a variety of amusing and picturesque poses) quite pleasing, aesthetically-wise speaking - but Uncle Wilmer might not.
May
27
answered What metaphor or phrase can describe an object that is aesthetically pleasing yet totally useless?
May
21
comment Succinct phrase that covers both “not started” and “previously started, later stopped”
I can't think of a word or phrase that captures both meanings as they represent different concepts. "Not Being Worked" is the best I can do, but I don't really think it captures the "started but not completed" aspect.
May
19
comment Is it correct to say “You are a path shower”
You do realize, don't you, that this song is on a par with another-song-that-will-remain-nameless in terms of "Please! Help me! I've got 'Show Me The Way' stuck in my head - and I can't get it out!". Although at the same time I'll grant you that "Frampton Comes Alive" is one of the best live albums I've ever heard... :-)
May
19
comment Is it correct to say “You are a path shower”
In colloquial American we might say, "You da man!".
May
16
answered What is this “Nor”?
May
9
comment What do you call someone who says they will do things but doesn't?
I'd say he's "overcommitted", a "pleaser", "doesn't know when to say no", "eyes are too big for his stomach", etc? My dear wife is much the same way - always has 17 things she wants to do, 24 that are half-started, but nothing ever gets finished.