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Apr
1
awarded  Popular Question
Mar
31
comment “Time of” something, “time for” something, or something else?
Nice! Thanks for the idiomatic expression~
May
2
comment “Seem”, “appear”, “look” — how to differentiate?
So it seems that "seem" does have a broader meaning than "look like", right? Like, um, "It looks as if it's going to rain" is quite the same as "It seems to rain".
Jan
28
awarded  Autobiographer
Jan
25
accepted How to understand the pronunciation of “nod” and “node”?
Jan
25
revised How to understand the pronunciation of “nod” and “node”?
added 3 characters in body
Jan
25
asked How to understand the pronunciation of “nod” and “node”?
Oct
8
accepted “Time of” something, “time for” something, or something else?
Oct
7
revised “Time of” something, “time for” something, or something else?
added 170 characters in body
Oct
7
comment “Time of” something, “time for” something, or something else?
@AndrewLeach Sorry for that. Because my English is relatively poor, so I could not think up a better way to express. >_<
Oct
7
comment “Time of” something, “time for” something, or something else?
Yeah. That's what I mean. So why not use "time of"?
Oct
7
awarded  Commentator
Oct
7
asked “Time of” something, “time for” something, or something else?
Apr
15
comment perfect tense: question on “unspecified time”
"discrete chunk" good explanation!
Apr
15
accepted perfect tense: question on “unspecified time”
Apr
15
comment perfect tense: question on “unspecified time”
thanks for so many examples..
Apr
15
awarded  Editor
Apr
15
revised perfect tense: question on “unspecified time”
edited body
Apr
15
asked perfect tense: question on “unspecified time”
Apr
8
comment Is “has died for several years” correct?
Do you mean that it's grammatically right, but depends on the context (maybe wrong)?