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  • 0 posts edited
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Jul
24
awarded  Caucus
Jun
15
answered How to read “E = (mc)²” so as not to mistake for “E = mc²”
Jun
15
comment How to read “E = (mc)²” so as not to mistake for “E = mc²”
While this might not work for well-known equations where people anyways hear what they expect to hear, not necessarily what the speaker said, think of a more general case, such as differentiating between xy² and (xy)².
Jun
15
comment How to read “E = (mc)²” so as not to mistake for “E = mc²”
To me this sounds like (E = mc)²
Jun
1
comment Meaning and usage of “to no end”
@Jay - too true
May
31
comment Meaning and usage of “to no end”
"I can't see how the phrase would be useful" - As a native speaker of English: the fact of the matter is that the phrase is used. "Since most people aren't annoying deliberately" - I guess you haven't met my siblings and coworkers :)
May
24
comment “Due to” at the beginning of a sentence
@rudra - Just because something is frequently said/heard doesn't mean it is grammatically correct.
May
23
comment Is “even” a choice in this sentence?
+1 Not a minor point at all; this conveys the OP's intentions best.
May
23
answered “Kitchen's wall” vs. “kitchen wall” vs. “the wall of his kitchen”
May
22
awarded  Citizen Patrol
May
18
awarded  Critic
May
15
comment Word to describe sounds from a one-year old child
@RegDwight - thanks for changing the backticks for italics. Just for future reference, is there a standard to follow as far as which one to use when?
May
15
comment In 'large herds of elephant and buffalo', why elephant not elephants?
The reason we say cups of coffee is because coffee is not something that can be broken down into a single unit (ie: cannot be counted). You can count coffee beans, or droplets of coffee, but not coffee itself. The same for chocolate - you can count it in granules or squares; saying "I had three chocolates" implies three pieces of chocolate. In contrast, elephants are individual units, and so the noun can be pluralized. For more examples, see RoaringFish's comment to mgb's question (boxes of crayons, cartons of eggs, etc).
May
15
answered Word to describe sounds from a one-year old child
May
14
comment Should I put a comma before the last item in a list?
Can you please expound on your last point? I don't understand why placement of the comma implies equal versus unfair division of the estate. Is it because leaving out the comma seems to group Jane and Carol together?
May
14
comment Correct use of “but”, “however” and “although”
In this case, the same way but and although need to be preceeded by a comma, however can stay if it's preceeded by a semicolon.
May
14
answered Usage and correctness of the term “Better than Best”
May
14
answered “lives of people have remained a mystery” …weird?
May
14
comment Can Apple spell correctly?
@Jim - NYC area. Nope, I definitely don't say it. The example sentences here sound slangy to my ears - if I heard someone speak such a way I'd understand what they're saying but think it improper.
May
14
comment Can Apple spell correctly?
Born and bred in the US: I've never heard "What's..." used as a contraction for "What does..."