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seen Mar 18 at 20:37

Feb
20
awarded  Quorum
Nov
5
answered Origin and exact meaning of the phrase “I have to go see a man about a dog”
Nov
5
revised What rules of English allow the first t in “patient” to make an sh sound?
Clarify the PX; deleted 1 characters in body
Nov
4
comment What rules of English allow the first t in “patient” to make an sh sound?
.. and I do tend to rant at 7:00 AM without sleep.. I got caught up in my Italian lessons (Skype).. and then discovered this site... (I guess I missed a few significant points about the site :)
Nov
4
comment What rules of English allow the first t in “patient” to make an sh sound?
The "patterns" aren't hard and fast "rules" as most people expect them to be... The patterns refer to the fact that many "odd" spelling recurr, and even though they seem bizzare if you analyze them phonetically (with a contemporay ear-to-letter relationship), they do have their own rhyme an reason... many make sense when you say them with a French tilt or an Irish lilt or a Latin/Italian twist..... And as I have now realized, this site is primarily a Stackoverflow overflow ;) I had the wrong idea of what this site is (currently) about... I thought it was primarily an ESL English learning site
Nov
4
revised What rules of English allow the first t in “patient” to make an sh sound?
PS:; added 19 characters in body
Nov
4
awarded  Editor
Nov
4
revised What rules of English allow the first t in “patient” to make an sh sound?
deleted 14 characters in body; added 4 characters in body; added 83 characters in body; added 9 characters in body
Nov
4
answered What rules of English allow the first t in “patient” to make an sh sound?
Nov
4
comment How does one correctly use a semicolon?
@Sarhanis: The comma is 100% adequate to disambiguate simple list items (as in the list in your example). See The Oxford Comma - oxforddictionaries.com/page/202 ... Lists whose items contain commas are as rare as hen's teeth, but they can be seperated by colons (but only in this case).
Nov
4
awarded  Teacher
Nov
4
answered Word for descriptive complimentary closes in letters
Nov
4
comment Visceral English words
"mellifluous" only sounds smooth and sweet because the speaker intones it that way... The same speaker could make you cringe as he utters "malevolent", or make you feel warm and comfortable as he spoke of someone "benevolent" ... It's all in the tone... Your tone and cadence and context make the words evocative.