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Jul
1
awarded  Critic
Jul
1
comment Why is “our today's meeting” wrong?
@F.E. That's another exception. In that phrase, the word "home" can be seen as having two determiners, "your father's" and "old people's", but for whatever reason, "old people's home" is treated as if it were a plain noun phrase without a determiner. "Your father's home" would not be an exception, because in that phrase, the word "home" only has one determiner, which is "your father's".
Jun
24
comment What do you call it when it's not raining, but the atmosphere causes everything to be wet?
Whoops, ignore the words "the process of" in my comment.
Jun
23
comment What do you call it when it's not raining, but the atmosphere causes everything to be wet?
I'm not sure if this is correct. Humidity refers to the process of water vapor in the air; the only way that water vapor would make things wet is by forming dew.
Jun
13
awarded  Yearling
Jun
12
comment Why is “our today's meeting” wrong?
@terdon That sounds like a plausible explanation, but I'm not actually sure.
Jun
12
comment Why is “our today's meeting” wrong?
@terdon "These my children" sounds incorrect to me, unless you're saying "these, my children" (using "these" as a pronoun instead of as a determiner) or "these are my children" (leaving out the "are", as some dialects often do).
Jun
11
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
10
answered Why is “our today's meeting” wrong?
Apr
19
awarded  Editor
Apr
19
revised Is “I like dogs but cats” a valid sentence?
Fix typo: "much short that" for "much shorter than"
Apr
19
awarded  Commentator
Apr
19
comment Is “I like dogs but cats” a valid sentence?
I don't think this tells the whole story. The sentence "I like dogs except puppies" sounds right to me, but "I like dogs but puppies" doesn't; it would have to be "I like all dogs but puppies". I think using "but" to mean "except" requires also using "all".
Apr
19
suggested approved edit on Is “I like dogs but cats” a valid sentence?
Mar
17
comment A more formal word for 'Screwed.'
Note that if you're quoting an online source, you should leave the phrase exactly as it is. "In this story, Alice says to Bob, 'You're screwed.'"
Feb
11
awarded  Popular Question
Dec
6
awarded  Necromancer
Sep
19
comment “How to..”, “How do you..” or “How do I..” when asking a practical question
I don't think I've ever heard the phrasing "How to serialize an object?" in spoken English. The phrase "how to serialize an object" is a valid phrase in some contexts, but it's not a valid question all by itself.
Aug
3
awarded  Yearling
Aug
3
awarded  Scholar