1,807 reputation
25
bio website
location Where English comes from. England in the United Kingdom. (UK)
age
visits member for 2 years, 5 months
seen Nov 18 '13 at 2:28

British (not "bRRII-dIIsh" or "bRRII-IIsh"). Speaker of English (the English English Kind). Enthusiastic about languages. Interested in learning about how to use language and sharing the benefit of my experience as a speaker of the English of England, UK.


Mar
22
awarded  Yearling
Jan
24
awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
17
comment What vivid verb should I use when someone “turns into” a zombie?
One of them was an artificial virus, created by scientists working for a big corporation.
Nov
16
comment Best internet sites for British English learners?
You can start by looking for all the questions regarding British English, on this site.
Nov
16
comment “I'm Spanish” or “I'm a Spanish”?
Wow, that was an undignified comment!
Nov
15
comment Are you exercising tonight or Do you have an exercise?
user57018, that is because US Army is a shorter way of writing United States Army, which is a name of something in particular.
Nov
15
comment Are you exercising tonight or Do you have an exercise?
There should be a capital A in US Army.
Nov
15
comment “I'm Spanish” or “I'm a Spanish”?
As I suspected.
Nov
15
comment “I'm Spanish” or “I'm a Spanish”?
That doesn't sound very polite, terdon.
Nov
15
comment “I'm Spanish” or “I'm a Spanish”?
Cyberherbalist, considering that the definition of a Spaniard is someone from Spain, it would not make much sense for someone who comes from another land, to call themselves a Spaniard, if they became a citizen of Spain. In that case, they could say that they are a Spanish citizen or Spanish dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/british/spanish_1?q=Spanish
Nov
14
comment “I'm Spanish” or “I'm a Spanish”?
According to the definition here ldoceonline.com/dictionary/Spaniard , a Spaniard is someone from Spain. It says nothing about citizenship or nationality.
Nov
14
answered “I'm Spanish” or “I'm a Spanish”?
Nov
13
comment Difference between “slacks”, “pants”, and “trousers”?
This definition seems to exist only in American English.
Nov
12
comment “Invite” vs. “invitation”
Lunivore, you seem to be right. Invite seems to be used more often by Americans. For most of my life, I only heard people in the UK using invitation. I have noticed people using invite, over here, in the last few years.
Nov
11
comment What's the difference between “lad” and “mate” in British English?
I don't know about the downvote. It wasn't from me.
Nov
11
comment What's the difference between “lad” and “mate” in British English?
Mari-Lou A, North England should be Northern England.
Nov
11
comment How do you correctly say large numbers
What is correct, seems to depend on whether someone speaks American English, or not.
Nov
8
comment How do you say 'cooked pig small intestine filled with pig blood' in English?
T.E.D., that's strange.
Nov
8
comment How do you say 'cooked pig small intestine filled with pig blood' in English?
I haven't heard of Blood sausage, only Black pudding.
Nov
7
comment What vivid verb should I use when someone “turns into” a zombie?
Matthew, where zombies come from varies in fiction. Different stories have different explanations for them. Regarding the word turn, I remember it being used in the zombie programme called The Walking Dead.