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bio website naught101.org
location Australia
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visits member for 2 years, 8 months
seen Oct 23 at 9:55

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Oct
8
comment Starting a sentence with because
@MarkBailey: Not true, both words can be used as synonyms of "because" - since (def 2), as (def 5). The problem is that they both have tonnes of other meanings, and that can make them less clear. But it's usually fairly obvious from the context.
Oct
3
comment What is the first part of a joke called?
@Gareth: I should put in a feature request to get all links to TVtropes banned during work hours.
Oct
3
comment What is the first part of a joke called?
@lol: Not to mention scifi/fantasy trivia..
Oct
3
comment What is the collective noun for a group of scorpions?
@GreenAsJade: Sure, that's why I didn't suggest that "whip" was a collective noun. You can click the phrase in the table down the bottom to get a Google Books search, and that allows you to check how the phrase is used.
Oct
3
awarded  Yearling
Oct
3
awarded  Teacher
Oct
3
answered What is the collective noun for a group of scorpions?
Oct
3
comment What is the collective noun for a group of scorpions?
Surely a nest is only applicable when they're in a place (their home, under a rock or what ever), and not when they're on the move (a marauding cyclone of scorpions.. heh).
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Sep
16
comment “Despite the fact” implies knowledge of said facts
To me, "He borrowed my car, despite the fact that it needs new brakes." has a (vague) implication that you informed him that the brakes were bad. "He borrowed my car, despite the fact that I told him it needs new brakes." is much closer to the original than "He borrowed my car, despite the fact that I didn't tell him it needs new brakes.". Also the odds in blackjack aren't overwhelming, and the house doesn't necessarily have better odds :P. And the odds at roulette are known, and usually disregarded in favour of "luck".
Apr
19
awarded  Notable Question
Oct
1
awarded  Notable Question
Aug
9
comment Origin and meaning of “from out of left field”
Wow. Your sentence lengths are astounding.
Aug
9
accepted Origin and meaning of “from out of left field”
Aug
9
awarded  Scholar
Aug
9
accepted How to punctuate an example indicated by “say”
Aug
9
awarded  Popular Question
Jul
14
comment Is “man” the opposite of “woman”?
Can anything have "opposites"? Red and green are generally considered opposites, and they are on the colour wheel, but the concept make no sense on the EMR spectrum. Black and white are opposites, but actually they're just our perception of the minimum and maximum light sensitivity in our eyes - our black is an Owl's grey. Totally abstract absolute concepts like left/right are opposite, but even they depend on which way you're facing...
Jul
14
comment If the English language is always evolving, why do we need to learn and follow grammatical rules?
It would probably add something to this answer to mention "Colorless green ideas sleep furiously"‌​. That perfect standard grammar applied arbitrarily can result in meaningless sentences.
Jul
14
comment Does appending a question mark to a declarative sentence result in a valid sentence?
The "rules" are extracted from the language, not the other way around. They're not really 'rules', but common patterns. The patterns are shared among many language users, and so breaking really common ones can cause confusion. But like all patterns in nature, there are many exceptions to the rules, and rules within rules. Anyway, one particularly clear pattern among native speakers is that in some cases, you can drop a large part of the sentence, and leave it implicit. "(are) You coming?", "(is that) Really (true)?". Why is that not also grammatically correct?