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  • 47 votes cast
Mar
1
comment Has “hacker” definitely gained a negative connotation?
And hackers were feared by the general public because what they did was criminal. That counts more than fans of would-be Jesse James
Mar
1
comment How many syllables are in “orange”?
This whole forum is about the vagaries and variations of language; it is the last place you should make assumptions about intuition (which is another way of asking others to read your mind). Even when I can guess, I often ask for clarification because I don't want to impose my context and assumptions (and I am a native English speaker)
Dec
29
comment What is the expression for being unwilling to pay a (small) fine rather than spend much more to avoid it?
If we were immortal, no one would buy insurance because, in the long run, it all works out even. It is the short-term and statistically unlikely events that we want protection from because we don't have a few thousand years for it to even out. I'm looking for terms associated with checking or not checking to see the cost or likelihood of failure, perhaps terrified of its stigma, to the point where one spends far more on success than it is worth.
Dec
29
comment What is the expression for being unwilling to pay a (small) fine rather than spend much more to avoid it?
I'm not sure about "willing to let other people be hurt." My query is more about self-centered decisions that are not concerned about the purpose of fines (to promote actions for the public good). I think cynics believe others are heartless and selfish. I find most of them are wounded romantics.
Dec
29
comment What is the expression for being unwilling to pay a (small) fine rather than spend much more to avoid it?
It's a choice; good or bad money is an analysis of that choice. If I have lots of money, a $30 parking ticket is better for me than getting up and moving my car.
Dec
29
comment What is the expression for being unwilling to pay a (small) fine rather than spend much more to avoid it?
I'm not judging the amount of the fine or the system which allows this to happen; I'm looking for the expression for making the decision
Dec
29
comment What is the expression for being unwilling to pay a (small) fine rather than spend much more to avoid it?
One must judge between the "effort" represented by money. Everyone makes the best decision they can at the time; I'm looking for the "screw it, I'll just pay the parking ticket" decision
Dec
29
comment What is the expression for being unwilling to pay a (small) fine rather than spend much more to avoid it?
Indulgence is very close. I'm looking for an expression for the decision to pay an indulgence rather than avoiding sin
Nov
3
comment English word for taking a derogatory term and owning it with pride
"reclaim" implies that one claimed it in the first place. "embrace" works, thanks
Sep
23
comment Term for putting someone else's name on one's work?
Maybe auto-pseudoepigrapha in this case
Sep
3
comment To be worse than nothing
"It's so bad, it's not even wrong"
Mar
4
comment Grammatical term for topicizing in English: Thing, question/statement about thing
I'm looking for the name of this type of sentence construction
Jan
27
comment “A good knowledge in English”/“a good knowledge of English”
The OED might show you when the current usages started, but you need a forensic linguist to figure out why it ended up this way
Jan
26
comment Compound Adjectives and -ed
Great question. If one called him "short-temper man", it sounds like a title (a super-hero name). We seem to need an adjective instead of a noun.
Jan
26
comment What is the name for the the habit of reciting song titles or clichés when anyone says the first few words?
No, "showboating" is showing-off. And twerking can mean anything these days. I mean, the need to show everyone that you get the joke, really!
Sep
4
comment English word for taking a derogatory term and owning it with pride
But "reclaim" implies that one claimed it in the first place; more of an aikido Tachi dori
Aug
9
comment English word for taking a derogatory term and owning it with pride
"amelioration" brings to mind tending to bruises rather than taking the stick
Aug
9
comment English word for taking a derogatory term and owning it with pride
Thank you for looking those up; I've used a few "terminology"? It fits, but it likely fits half of all requests on this board.
Aug
7
comment English word for taking a derogatory term and owning it with pride
The OP is not allowed to create tags, and "title" was the only one I could find.
Aug
4
comment Positioning of adverb phrases
Of the first two: are you emphasizing the repetition or the mental aspect?