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awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
14
awarded  Yearling
Feb
24
awarded  Civic Duty
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10
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24
awarded  Autobiographer
Sep
8
comment Is “proven” very old -fashioned?
@PeterShor, I myself am quite baffled as to how to interpret that statement - hence a question mark in brackets [? - Alex B.].
Aug
27
awarded  Good Answer
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15
awarded  Popular Question
Jun
15
awarded  Caucus
Jun
9
awarded  Necromancer
May
16
comment Hypernym of “triad”, “tetrad”, “pentad”
It could be a set.
May
11
comment Etymology: to till the land
There's nothing unusual about this semantic change. OED "†1. intr. To strive, exert oneself, labour, work" developed into "4a. trans. To bestow labour and attention, such as ploughing, harrowing, manuring, etc., upon (land) so as to fit it for raising crops; to cultivate."
Apr
15
answered Is there any difference between “a few relatives” and “a few relations”?
Mar
29
comment About the etymology of Bachelor
Le Grand Robert adds that OF bacheler (1080) was also used with the same meaning, cf. "Sous la féodalité, Jeune gentilhomme qui aspirait à devenir chevalier, et s'y préparait sous la conduite d'un seigneur."
Mar
29
comment About the etymology of Bachelor
OED says that the word bachelor (ME bacheler) originally meant "A young knight, not old enough, or having too few vassals, to display his own banner, and who therefore followed the banner of another; a novice in arms."
Mar
14
awarded  Yearling
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21
awarded  Necromancer
Jun
2
comment “Café” vs. “coffee shop” in American English
Worth taking a look at baristaexchange.com/forum/topics/difference-between-coffee
Jun
2
comment “Café” vs. “coffee shop” in American English
@Barney, LPD-3 (Wells 2008) says the following "sometimes also (but in RP only facetiously) kæf, keɪf."
May
4
revised Achievement Verbs with the Progressive Aspect
added the link