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Mar
31
comment Is “programming” not a noun?
"a programming class": programming here is a (gerundial) noun; "a programming grandparent": programming here is a participial adjective.
Mar
20
comment How does the prefix 'hyper-' explain 'hyperopia' (farsightedness)?
@LePressentiment On the other hand, I would like to make a very important side note. It seems you do not understand how etymological research is done, cf. "I accept that some words' etymology is ambiguous, unknown or inexistent." There is no such thing as "inexistent etymology" [sic!]. We may not know it yet, for different reasons, but it is always the end result of our extremely time-consuming, meticulous comparative research. Linguists propose etymological analysis based on linguistic, anthropological etc. evidence; in other words, linguists try to reconstruct its development.
Mar
20
comment How does the prefix 'hyper-' explain 'hyperopia' (farsightedness)?
@LePressetiment Etymonline is wrong. The other posters told you already, hyperopia literally means "beyond the eye (i.e. retina)."
Mar
14
awarded  Yearling
Feb
23
awarded  Necromancer
Oct
26
comment “Focussed” or “focused”? The double consonant
@tchrist I thought you may find this amusing. theregister.co.uk/2005/03/03/msdos_paternity_dispute
Aug
10
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
30
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
14
awarded  Yearling
Feb
24
awarded  Civic Duty
Oct
10
awarded  Necromancer
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Sep
8
comment Is “proven” very old -fashioned?
@PeterShor, I myself am quite baffled as to how to interpret that statement - hence a question mark in brackets [? - Alex B.].
Aug
27
awarded  Good Answer
Aug
15
awarded  Popular Question
Jun
15
awarded  Caucus
Jun
9
awarded  Necromancer
May
16
comment Hypernym of “pair/dyad”, “tetrad”, “pentad”
It could be a set.
May
11
comment Etymology: to till the land
There's nothing unusual about this semantic change. OED "†1. intr. To strive, exert oneself, labour, work" developed into "4a. trans. To bestow labour and attention, such as ploughing, harrowing, manuring, etc., upon (land) so as to fit it for raising crops; to cultivate."
Apr
15
answered Is there any difference between “a few relatives” and “a few relations”?