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Feb
2
revised Word Choice: Starting a sentence with “If not too long ago”
added 243 characters in body
Feb
2
answered Word Choice: Starting a sentence with “If not too long ago”
Feb
2
comment English equivalent for “Don't burn your house to smoke out a rat!”
That's a good one. AFAIAC, following the tradition of the English language plagiarizing elements of other languages, hence on, Don't burn your house down to smoke out a rat shall be an English idiom.
Jan
31
answered The use of comma before 'and'
Jan
31
comment Is this type of conditional sentence used by native speakers?
I am not comfortable with that. For a future proposition/possibility, I would write/say, If my m-i-l came tomorrow, I would spend all day cleaning the house. Alternatively, floating the predicate into retrospective past: If my m-i-l were coming the next day, I would have spent all day cleaning the house.
Jan
31
comment Rankings out of integer and a half?
The term is half-integers: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Half-integer.
Jan
25
comment 'likely' and 'probable'
To the downvoter, perhaps you don't like Statistics? english.stackexchange.com/questions/235234/…
Jan
24
comment Word to describe something which exists both in the mortal world and the afterlife?
Transcendental?
Jan
24
comment What are these “[verb]-ing” forms called?
It's been asked at least a couple times before. .e.g. english.stackexchange.com/questions/170336/…
Jan
18
comment on your desk or at your desk?
On the wall is a nearly an idiomatic use. When you look at a notice board tacked with all kinds of memos, and you can't see your memo - then someone yells at you to say, "Your memo is underneath the poster. Someone has tacked a poster on top of other people's memos." Despite that the notice board being vertical on the vertical wall.
Jan
15
comment Are there advertent mistakes?
Is it a mistake to believe that the Bible condemns homosexuality? It is a mistake and a deliberate and advertent one.
Jan
14
comment Succeed in survival?
Then, you do agree that besides the asker using the word "succeed" rather than "success" or "succeeding", there is nothing logically, mathematically, or "semantically" wrong with the sentence?
Jan
14
answered Idiom or slang to show you're scared and/or sorry
Jan
14
comment Succeed in survival?
Given that the asker's "succeed" actually meant "succeeding" or "success", any statistician who encounters the phrase "you have 50% success in survival" or "you have 50% succeeding in survival", we will have no objection to the phrases being mathematically/logically acceptable statements.
Jan
14
comment Succeed in survival?
Is it "semantically incorrect" for someone to say to his family after a long bicycle tourney, "I'm half-dead" ? Because according to you, you are either dead or alive.
Jan
14
comment What's up with the use of the word “black” in reference to skin color?
A South African born in South Africa, and so was his grandfather, and great-grandfather. Then he came to America. Is he African-American? I mean, he is not black.
Jan
14
comment Succeed in survival?
No idea what you are expounding.
Jan
14
comment Succeed in survival?
The proper way to ask is "Can someone say if the sentence above is grammatically correct?" When there is a "if" the phrase "or not" is redundant. In fact, you should simply ask, "Is the the sentence above grammatically correct?"
Jan
14
comment “I burned the toast” vs. “I've burned the toast”
Garfield doesn't think Jon is the owner. Garfield thinks he is the owner and Jon the pet. And Jon knows that.
Jan
13
comment If I didn´t live = Were I not to live?
I don't agree that one is preferred to the other. Both are contextually relevant to appropriate situations. But I shan't vote you down.