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seen Jul 21 at 5:21

Come unto me, all ye who are weary of heavy-laden clients and I will give you REST.

Agile is the substance of features planned for, the avoidance of milestones unseen.


Jul
20
comment Passive voice expressed by means of the active voice
Colin, no, it is not.
Jul
20
revised Passive voice expressed by means of the active voice
added 695 characters in body
Jul
20
answered What is the name of the first decade in a century?
Jul
20
comment What is the name of these display machines used inside libraries?
Holy cowabunga!!! You must be so young to this world that you don't know that microfiche and microfilm had been common terms prior to 25 years ago. You are probably also asking why - you dial a number on a cell phone; - you watch a film on a DVD movie.
Jul
20
comment What is the name of these display machines used inside libraries?
+Kris, Microform - en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microform.
Jul
20
comment What's the difference betwen perhaps and maybe?
Maybe is a colloquial replacement to perhaps. On a scientific or technical paper, you should use perhaps, rather than maybe. And then on such a technical paper, you would also need to further justify your maybeness with more precision on the %age chance or degrees of freedom of the possibilities.
Jul
20
comment Why is New York City also called “the Big Apple”?
I believe yours is the true, but "unprovenable" answer. I think it started off by some people marking various cities on a NY map with the apple icon, and NYC was marked with the biggest and most prominent apple.
Jul
20
answered Passive voice expressed by means of the active voice
Jul
16
comment Using past participle vs existent noun form for adjective
Edwin, should I prefer to quibble over if my examples were accurate to the bone, or should I prefer to quibble over participle vs non-participle adjectives. So please tell me why it is less desirable for me to say yellow-doored house? Why wouldn't more native speakers say red-hair girl, white-tail deer? Is it acceptable to say it contrary to popular practice?
Jul
16
comment Using past participle vs existent noun form for adjective
What about white-tailed deer? If you don't give me a reasoned answer for white-tailed deer, I will have to vote you down. Because I feel you have but simply concocted a willy-nilly rule.
Jul
16
asked Using past participle vs existent noun form for adjective
Jul
11
comment Can you distinguish the permission to do something from the license, an official document?
@user1610952 You should click the check mark to choose it as the accepted answer. You (the asker) are the only person allowed to mark a response as the answer. You can do this even though you don't have enough reputation to upvote yet.
Jul
11
comment What is a proper response to a joke about visiting dentist at 2:30/tooth hurty?
The usual term is tooth-extraction.
Jul
11
comment Nor without neither?
It is not acceptable to say, "I don't have a pen NOR a pencil". It is but acceptable as pidgin.
Jul
8
comment What is a “copular” verb?
Is this not good enough an explanation already en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Copula_(linguistics) ???
Jul
7
comment Register vs Apply
What about the [apply] button I am hinted to push, every time I modify a value in the Preferences of the Eclipse IDE?
Jul
4
comment A word to the wise?
We should not ignore or delegitmise the prevalence due to US English etymology, even if a certain usage had actually originated from an earlier phrase of British origin. Because and anyway, just look around ... Why have Britishers acquiesced to spelling program instead of programme in most cases? In fact, why do most British and Australian singers even sing in US/Canada pronunciation? Just as English had imported French and butchered those words, so now please let us import British phrases and let us have our hegemonic privilege of butchering such phrases. Besides it's 4th July.
Jul
4
comment A word to the wise?
This should be the accepted answer.
Jul
4
comment A word to the wise?
Regardless of the etymology or origins of the phrase, Mr E. Upvoter's is the current attitude of the phrase. And since Mr E's presumption's structure holds grammatical integrity, I am falling for his answer. It does not matter what the forefathers had intended for the US Constitution, but how our Supreme Court today interprets the Constitution.
Jul
4
answered Interpretation of a message