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Feb
2
answered What does “OP” mean, as in “massively OP version of force telekinesis”?
Jan
26
accepted Are there any terms analogous to “novelization” for other types of adaptations?
Jan
18
comment Are there any terms analogous to “novelization” for other types of adaptations?
I know I could just invent a term and most English speakers would be able to figure out what it meant; I was looking for any such words that might already have been established. The only other similar term I came across was gamification but that means something slightly different (similar to dramatization, gamification seems to be used almost exclusively to describe turning some real-life activity into a game.)
Jan
18
comment Are there any terms analogous to “novelization” for other types of adaptations?
When I hear the word dramatization I think of taking real-life event and recreating it with actors, e.g. a "dramatization" of a crime on a news show...
Jan
18
comment Are there any terms analogous to “novelization” for other types of adaptations?
Formatting Help tells me it's called preformatted text so I think I'm safe.
Jan
18
revised Are there any terms analogous to “novelization” for other types of adaptations?
added 257 characters in body
Jan
18
asked Are there any terms analogous to “novelization” for other types of adaptations?
Oct
28
awarded  Autobiographer
Sep
11
comment Capitalization After Colon
So, are you talking about the English you spoke in the 1600s when you colonized us, or the variant you speak now?
Aug
15
awarded  Popular Question
Aug
5
answered Another word besides cyborg or android?
Jul
1
accepted Is there a (possible archaic) definition of “permitted” that does not imply “permission”?
Jul
1
accepted Why do we qualify “dish washer” or “car wash” but not “clothes washer”?
Mar
19
comment Does “morning sickness” only relate to pregnancy? Did it always?
I think I've seen that quote about pseudocyesis before, because I recognize the casual way that it refers to a fetus as a 'symptom of pregnancy' :)
Feb
23
comment Is there a (possible archaic) definition of “permitted” that does not imply “permission”?
I did see that, but that definition didn't seem to make sense to me in the context of a specific person being "permitted" to do something that pretty much anyone could physically do anyway. that's why I asked about the whole phrase. But, if that's the answer then I guess that's the answer. :)
Feb
23
asked Is there a (possible archaic) definition of “permitted” that does not imply “permission”?
Feb
1
comment Person who pretends to not understand unless one speaks in exactly the words they expect
People like this are incredibly annoying and rarely worth speaking to. Unless you're saying "irregardless", in which case they're right. :)
Jan
28
awarded  Yearling
Jan
28
comment What's the difference between Anonymous and Pseudonymous?
@HotLicks that's true; I had added that part because I think the way people understand anonymity and pseudonymity is changing because of the growth of online activity, but the article I cited was only tangentially related to the idea of pseudonyms. I've removed it.
Jan
28
revised What's the difference between Anonymous and Pseudonymous?
remove online-only part.