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 Yearling
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Mar
19
comment Does “morning sickness” only relate to pregnancy? Did it always?
I think I've seen that quote about pseudocyesis before, because I recognize the casual way that it refers to a fetus as a 'symptom of pregnancy' :)
Feb
23
comment Is there a (possible archaic) definition of “permitted” that does not imply “permission”?
I did see that, but that definition didn't seem to make sense to me in the context of a specific person being "permitted" to do something that pretty much anyone could physically do anyway. that's why I asked about the whole phrase. But, if that's the answer then I guess that's the answer. :)
Feb
23
asked Is there a (possible archaic) definition of “permitted” that does not imply “permission”?
Feb
1
comment Person who pretends to not understand unless one speaks in exactly the words they expect
People like this are incredibly annoying and rarely worth speaking to. Unless you're saying "irregardless", in which case they're right. :)
Jan
28
awarded  Yearling
Jan
28
comment What's the difference between Anonymous and Pseudonymous?
@HotLicks that's true; I had added that part because I think the way people understand anonymity and pseudonymity is changing because of the growth of online activity, but the article I cited was only tangentially related to the idea of pseudonyms. I've removed it.
Jan
28
revised What's the difference between Anonymous and Pseudonymous?
remove online-only part.
Jan
28
answered What's the difference between Anonymous and Pseudonymous?
Jan
26
comment Are there rules to determine whether a musician's title will end with “-er” or “-ist”?
I am absolutely going to tell people I guitarize from now on.
Dec
24
awarded  Critic
Oct
25
comment What is the word for a sentence that initially sounds profound or deep, that is, in fact, meaningless or empty?
how about "a tweet"
Sep
26
comment Why do we qualify “dish washer” or “car wash” but not “clothes washer”?
@jwpat7 I'm not an ngrams expert by any means but wouldn't ngrams pick up "dish washer" as an example of "washer" as well?
Sep
26
comment Why do we qualify “dish washer” or “car wash” but not “clothes washer”?
This sounds reasonable, though I'll note that in US usage, washing clothes is not usually called washing but more typically doing laundry or just laundry. If some asked me if I had done my washing I'm not sure what I would assume they meant, but probably bathing/showering barring any context...
Sep
26
asked Why do we qualify “dish washer” or “car wash” but not “clothes washer”?
Sep
10
comment Why do sentences that start with “guess” end with a question mark?
@MickaelCaruso The media, in particular, is always taking shortcuts to reduce word count/page size/etc. Most of the time when a news article uses a "guess x..." sentence, they really do mean something like "Can you guess x...? The answer is surprising, so we'll tell you!"
Aug
14
comment “Take a photo” — why “take”?
There's also clearly a lot of regional variation here, as take a look is equally common in the US as have a look, and I've never personally heard an AmE speaker use have a read.
Aug
7
comment Does the word 'late' comes in a bad sense?
As an aside, if you want a word that always has a bad connotation, tardy means late in the sense of "late for an appointment" but never any of the other meanings of late.
Aug
3
comment Why is the plural of “deer” the same as the singular?
does deers have the same meaning as fishes, e.g. multiple different species of deer?
Jul
6
awarded  Scholar
Jul
6
accepted What is the term for a child that's in between toddler and adolescent?