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seen Dec 24 at 15:22

Jul
24
comment What is a “blow-off answer”?
Another blow off question: why are you still here?
Jul
22
comment What is the appropriate command when one is thirsty?
But it would work if you used a preposition. Hydrate me with wine!
Jul
22
comment How can I distinguish between the singular and plural of “species”?
Could you perhaps qualify them by saying the particular species or multiple species?
Jul
22
comment What does “Nate Silver’s deal with ESPN is about more than Disney vs. the New York Times” mean?
@Gus Yep. No need to rely on Wikipedia. ;) thewaltdisneycompany.com/disney-companies/media-networks
Jun
27
comment What is the player called who has a turn?
As other answers have said, current player or active player are both good options. Turning player is definitely not. The meaning of the word turn as a verb has no relation to the meaning of the noun turn in the context of a card game. So unless the avatars in the game are spinning around, turning player sounds nonsensical.
Jun
19
comment Is there a specific word in English (a noun) for the strong smell of spaces like cellars, basements and storerooms?
Chiming in here, but I would expect a pine forest to smell the opposite of musty. That's why they make those pine cleaners and dangly things to hang in cars, after all. Perhaps a fetid swamp or secluded cave could be described as musty, but it's most commonly applied to enclosed spaces and old books.
Jun
19
comment Use of “permission” in technical writing
I have no idea what you mean by King-James-y. Thou and Thine are King-James-y. Authorized is a common and straightforward word with the specific meaning you are looking for. The word authorization is used specifically in the contexts of authentication and permissions in computer systems on both sides of the fence.
Jun
6
comment Usage of “she” to refer to a noun
@BeetleTheNeato Which I found delightful when I first learned the word!
Jun
6
comment Usage of “she” to refer to a noun
@Snubian Indeed, but I think in this particular case it's not an issue, since the plurality of the attacker/s is irrelevant. There could very well be a team of attackers on the other end of the line, how would we know? :)
Jun
6
comment Usage of “she” to refer to a noun
@BeetleTheNeato we so the same thing in english with s/he. But this becomes tiresome. It's simpler for the writer to imagine a gender and then be consistent.
Jun
6
comment Usage of “she” to refer to a noun
@BeetleTheNeato I do have functional fluency in portuguese. Isn't atacante male or female? This is the word referred to by she. I really don't understand why you're confused by this issue.
Jun
5
comment Usage of “she” to refer to a noun
PS. The title of this question is misleading. "She" is emphatically not referring to just a noun. It is referring to a hypothetical person — the hacker. In this case, it is wholly appropriate to use a gendered pronoun, even if the gender of the attacker is not explicit.
Jun
5
comment Usage of “she” to refer to a noun
I think whoever wrote that line succeeded. Why assume the attacker is male? Why shouldn't we be talking about a hypothetical female hacker? And most of all — why should it confuse you? Are your gender biases challenged? I wouldn't bat an eye if the pronoun used was their/they, and it doesn't sound clunky to my ear, although some would disagree.
May
25
comment Expression: Bag of hammers
I remember Foghorn Leghorn saying "nice girl but about as sharp as a sack of wet mice."
May
21
comment It's 2013, where's my flying car?
While it's impossible to know for certain the writer's intent, it's common to hear those phrases said with sarcasm. Therefore I agree with this answer: the sentences are most likely ironic.
May
15
comment Parts of speech for “indoors” vs. “outdoors”
@terdon I don't recall. It's in the Ngram corpus somewhere. ;)
May
15
comment Parts of speech for “indoors” vs. “outdoors”
I have another one: "David Rakoff 1964-2012: Writer penned lauded, darkly comic essays"
May
15
comment Parts of speech for “indoors” vs. “outdoors”
@Jeremy Yet this sort of thing does happen, often with trademarks. See xeroxed in the 1960s. (I googled that.)
May
15
comment What is the difference between “skeptical” and “cynical”?
I think you could also make the change in the last example too. John has a skeptical attitude means John doesn't take everything at face value — he investigates the truth. However, I believe your point was that you could not make the change without altering the meaning.
May
2
comment How to correctly name these percentages?
What is the cause of the additional percentage? Does it depend on something? That's where I'd start with coming up with the word. If it's an RPG game it could be a character skill bonus or class modifier, or perhaps it's a weapon modifier. If the number doesn't change then it would be part of the base percentage – so why does the number change?