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location Saskatoon, Canada
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visits member for 4 years
seen Nov 20 at 14:50

Aug
30
comment “Unexpected” quotation marks: Why?
@FumbleFingers No worries FumbleFingers, you are "forgiven".
Aug
30
comment “aim life with money”
This is an improvement, since it changes a non-grammatical sentence into a grammatical one; yet I still find it absurd and nonsensical, no matter how hard I try and wrap my brain around the metaphor.
Aug
28
comment What's the origin of the idiom “cut corners”?
@terdon hah! Good point. I guess I'd wager if Twain wrote about roofing, then your answer would be correct. ;-)
Aug
28
comment What's the origin of the idiom “cut corners”?
@bib I think any vehicle could cut a corner, but the OED believes first usage is in 1869 from Innocents Abroad by Mark Twain, and he was talking about a gondola, which is indeed a boat. :)
Aug
28
comment What's the origin of the idiom “cut corners”?
Cutting a corner isn't cutting off a corner — it's cutting as close to the corner as possible. I don't agree with your folk etymology of the phrase, and neither does the OED… I don't think it's logical that the phrase could disseminate to the wider public through its usage in a rather obscure trade.
Aug
22
comment What is the difference between “Sofa” and “Couch”?
@CarstenSchultz Yes, this is a chesterfield. However, in the early 1900s in the area I live it was common to call all couches "chesterfields" just as in the deep south all soda pops are "cokes".
Aug
21
comment Is there a word for someone who really has their act together
They may not be proper words yet, but one day they will be known as perfectly cromulent words and everyone will grok them.
Aug
21
comment What is the difference between “Sofa” and “Couch”?
That's funny, I would have said the opposite, couches have arms and sofas might not. To me a couch has that typical "loveseat" shape and style, while sofas are generally larger/more plush.
Aug
21
comment Is there a word for someone who really has their act together
I would call that person a hoopy frood.
Aug
19
comment What's the term for an antonym of a continuum?
I think your "beauty vs. intelligence" example is pretty much the same as "aesthetics vs. intellectuality". Aesthetics pertains to pure emotion and sensation as opposed to logic and reason. That said, I think besides height vs. width, the examples are arbitrary. You could just as easily say agility vs. endurance, emotion vs. intelligence, etc. There's no real semantic relationship between the words, it's just arbitrary.
Aug
15
comment A word that describes something that has been given a name
What irks me about the clarifying example is: what's wrong with saying choose a name? That's the word you're looking for. They're all names. Book names, movie names, character names, names of historical events… This question strikes me as making something more complicated than it needs to be. If you don't like the word "name" simply look in a thesaurus for alternatives to name: appellation, moniker, etc.
Aug
15
comment A word that describes something that has been given a name
I'll upvote yours and appellation.
Aug
14
comment A term for introductory phrases that qualify reality/veracity?
Instead of just calling them a "qualifying introductory phrase" couldn't you just say they're a qualifier?
Jul
31
comment Comma or no comma before “only”?
Related (duplicate?): english.stackexchange.com/questions/8109/…
Jul
31
comment Using “that” to describe everything.. Is this incorrect, or poor grammar?
@JohnLawler Agreed, there are other thats. I was addressing the particular that in the examples given in CrossFit games which all seemed to be determiners. I'll rephrase.
Jul
31
comment Where did the adage, “Love the sinner, hate the sin,” come from?
@FumbleFingers Yoichi Oishi did mention in his question that he thought the source of this adage was the Bible, but then he learned it wasn't. Therefore, I tried to answer the question in that context: where was the ultimate source of the expression, not when was it first written or said in English with that exact phrasing.
Jul
31
comment How can I spell out Pope Francis’s remark on gay priests, ‘Who am I to judge?’
It should also be noted that "Who am I to judge?" is not an uncommon phrase in English.
Jul
31
comment Idiom for someone who forgets their roots
"A rolling stone gathers no moss" can also refer to a person who changes locations, jobs, careers, etc. so much that they don't accumulate any wealth. The way I've most thought of it is that an active, vibrant person who lives life to the fullest isn't weighed down by baggage or other signs of stagnation. But I have no idea if this is a common or correct interpretation… :)
Jul
24
comment What is a “blow-off answer”?
Another blow off question: why are you still here?
Jul
22
comment What is the appropriate command when one is thirsty?
But it would work if you used a preposition. Hydrate me with wine!