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Jun
6
comment Usage of “she” to refer to a noun
@BeetleTheNeato I do have functional fluency in portuguese. Isn't atacante male or female? This is the word referred to by she. I really don't understand why you're confused by this issue.
Jun
5
comment Usage of “she” to refer to a noun
PS. The title of this question is misleading. "She" is emphatically not referring to just a noun. It is referring to a hypothetical person — the hacker. In this case, it is wholly appropriate to use a gendered pronoun, even if the gender of the attacker is not explicit.
Jun
5
comment Usage of “she” to refer to a noun
I think whoever wrote that line succeeded. Why assume the attacker is male? Why shouldn't we be talking about a hypothetical female hacker? And most of all — why should it confuse you? Are your gender biases challenged? I wouldn't bat an eye if the pronoun used was their/they, and it doesn't sound clunky to my ear, although some would disagree.
May
25
comment Expression: Bag of hammers
I remember Foghorn Leghorn saying "nice girl but about as sharp as a sack of wet mice."
May
21
comment It's 2013, where's my flying car?
While it's impossible to know for certain the writer's intent, it's common to hear those phrases said with sarcasm. Therefore I agree with this answer: the sentences are most likely ironic.
May
15
comment Parts of speech for “indoors” vs. “outdoors”
@terdon I don't recall. It's in the Ngram corpus somewhere. ;)
May
15
comment Parts of speech for “indoors” vs. “outdoors”
I have another one: "David Rakoff 1964-2012: Writer penned lauded, darkly comic essays"
May
15
comment Parts of speech for “indoors” vs. “outdoors”
@Jeremy Yet this sort of thing does happen, often with trademarks. See xeroxed in the 1960s. (I googled that.)
May
15
comment What is the difference between “skeptical” and “cynical”?
I think you could also make the change in the last example too. John has a skeptical attitude means John doesn't take everything at face value — he investigates the truth. However, I believe your point was that you could not make the change without altering the meaning.
May
2
comment How to correctly name these percentages?
What is the cause of the additional percentage? Does it depend on something? That's where I'd start with coming up with the word. If it's an RPG game it could be a character skill bonus or class modifier, or perhaps it's a weapon modifier. If the number doesn't change then it would be part of the base percentage – so why does the number change?
Mar
4
comment How to know when the z can't be used instead of s in an ending?
Use a dictionary?
Feb
27
comment Term for “Free to play” Videogame that Isn't Free
@theUg Most Freemium games I'm aware of (or the most popular ones) aren't particularly competitive. I'd love to see a counterexample of a Freemium game where the premium portion doesn't give a significant advantage to game play. What would be the point of the business model if this were not the case? I'm not sure why you believe the definition is lacking.
Feb
27
comment Does English have words to describe the lowest rank member of society?
Actually I believe hoi-polloi does have pejorative connotations.
Feb
26
comment Languages understandable to English-speakers without learning
@T.E.D. I don't think any linguist believes Portuguese is "a dialect of Spanish". Galacian-Portuguese and Castilian (modern Spanish) have been diverging for over a thousand years‌​, overtaking and absorbing their sister languages while diverging from each other. Mutual intelligibility aside, they have important pronunciation and vocabulary differences.
Feb
26
comment Is the last comma in “A, B, and C, do X” correct?
"generally you don't" need the serial comma? Bah, I say. Generally, you do.
Feb
26
comment What is the moon zenith called?
@JAM Nope. Midnight tracks the sun, not the moon. The moon is only occasionally opposite the sun.
Feb
20
comment What are the important differences between Canadian and American (USA) English?
@Kyudos I think there is some variation and not all Canadians pronounce it the same way, but I personally do rhyme futile with tile. Most americans say (IPA /ˈfju.təl/) rhyming it roughly with brutal. Wiktionary has a nice selection of two different US pronunciations of roof, contrasting them with the UK and US. You will note that the second US pronunciation is quite distinct from goof. Many Americans pronounce hoof the same way.
Feb
4
comment What is the i with a dot on top and dot on bottom called?
@AndrewLeach I was about to agree with you and vote to close, but then I realized this is a question asking for an English word for a foreign glyph. Not so sure it's off-topic.
Jan
17
comment Etymology of 'ripped' as in 'ripped abs'
I agree. "Ripped" is a higher level of "Cut". It's the definition being emphasized. +1 for OED citation where the quote defines ripped by adding and close to the skin.
Jan
16
comment What are the important differences between Canadian and American (USA) English?
@tchrist Do they really pronounce the vowel sounds differently? I'm not talking about whether they enunciate the 't' distinctly or not. According to the wikipedia article the writer/rider variant has a large distribution across the US, so maybe "most" is pushing it…