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Aug
21
comment Is there a word for someone who really has their act together
I would call that person a hoopy frood.
Aug
19
comment What's the term for an antonym of a continuum?
I think your "beauty vs. intelligence" example is pretty much the same as "aesthetics vs. intellectuality". Aesthetics pertains to pure emotion and sensation as opposed to logic and reason. That said, I think besides height vs. width, the examples are arbitrary. You could just as easily say agility vs. endurance, emotion vs. intelligence, etc. There's no real semantic relationship between the words, it's just arbitrary.
Aug
15
comment A word that describes something that has been given a name
What irks me about the clarifying example is: what's wrong with saying choose a name? That's the word you're looking for. They're all names. Book names, movie names, character names, names of historical events… This question strikes me as making something more complicated than it needs to be. If you don't like the word "name" simply look in a thesaurus for alternatives to name: appellation, moniker, etc.
Aug
15
comment A word that describes something that has been given a name
I'll upvote yours and appellation.
Aug
14
comment A term for introductory phrases that qualify reality/veracity?
Instead of just calling them a "qualifying introductory phrase" couldn't you just say they're a qualifier?
Jul
31
comment Comma or no comma before “only”?
Related (duplicate?): english.stackexchange.com/questions/8109/…
Jul
31
comment Using “that” to describe everything.. Is this incorrect, or poor grammar?
@JohnLawler Agreed, there are other thats. I was addressing the particular that in the examples given in CrossFit games which all seemed to be determiners. I'll rephrase.
Jul
31
comment Where did the adage, “Love the sinner, hate the sin,” come from?
@FumbleFingers Yoichi Oishi did mention in his question that he thought the source of this adage was the Bible, but then he learned it wasn't. Therefore, I tried to answer the question in that context: where was the ultimate source of the expression, not when was it first written or said in English with that exact phrasing.
Jul
31
comment How can I spell out Pope Francis’s remark on gay priests, ‘Who am I to judge?’
It should also be noted that "Who am I to judge?" is not an uncommon phrase in English.
Jul
31
comment Idiom for someone who forgets their roots
"A rolling stone gathers no moss" can also refer to a person who changes locations, jobs, careers, etc. so much that they don't accumulate any wealth. The way I've most thought of it is that an active, vibrant person who lives life to the fullest isn't weighed down by baggage or other signs of stagnation. But I have no idea if this is a common or correct interpretation… :)
Jul
24
comment What is a “blow-off answer”?
Another blow off question: why are you still here?
Jul
22
comment What is the appropriate command when one is thirsty?
But it would work if you used a preposition. Hydrate me with wine!
Jul
22
comment How can I distinguish between the singular and plural of “species”?
Could you perhaps qualify them by saying the particular species or multiple species?
Jul
22
comment What does “Nate Silver’s deal with ESPN is about more than Disney vs. the New York Times” mean?
@Gus Yep. No need to rely on Wikipedia. ;) thewaltdisneycompany.com/disney-companies/media-networks
Jun
27
comment What is the player called who has a turn?
As other answers have said, current player or active player are both good options. Turning player is definitely not. The meaning of the word turn as a verb has no relation to the meaning of the noun turn in the context of a card game. So unless the avatars in the game are spinning around, turning player sounds nonsensical.
Jun
19
comment Is there a specific word in English (a noun) for the strong smell of spaces like cellars, basements and storerooms?
Chiming in here, but I would expect a pine forest to smell the opposite of musty. That's why they make those pine cleaners and dangly things to hang in cars, after all. Perhaps a fetid swamp or secluded cave could be described as musty, but it's most commonly applied to enclosed spaces and old books.
Jun
19
comment Use of “permission” in technical writing
I have no idea what you mean by King-James-y. Thou and Thine are King-James-y. Authorized is a common and straightforward word with the specific meaning you are looking for. The word authorization is used specifically in the contexts of authentication and permissions in computer systems on both sides of the fence.
Jun
6
comment Usage of “she” to refer to a noun
@BeetleTheNeato Which I found delightful when I first learned the word!
Jun
6
comment Usage of “she” to refer to a noun
@Snubian Indeed, but I think in this particular case it's not an issue, since the plurality of the attacker/s is irrelevant. There could very well be a team of attackers on the other end of the line, how would we know? :)
Jun
6
comment Usage of “she” to refer to a noun
@BeetleTheNeato we so the same thing in english with s/he. But this becomes tiresome. It's simpler for the writer to imagine a gender and then be consistent.