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2d
comment English equivalent to the Indian saying “Like a thief being stung by a scorpion”
@JoeBlow I disagree. If I skipped school, didn't like injections, and my parents thought I was at risk because of a school trip, I would indeed be between a rock and a hard place. Do I confess and incur their wrath, or not confess and get an unpleasant injection?
2d
comment Idiom criticizing a person who has unsolved problems but tries to give someone advice about them
While physician, heal thyself is a related idiom, it assumes that the person is capable of solving their own problems, but unwilling. I think the Iranian proverb casts aspersions on the person trying to solve problems for others — she/he is incapable of solving that problem for themselves.
Jan
22
comment “Digital computer” in the 1940s
Agree with @HotLicks. Digital is not synonymous with binary. Binary is a subset of digital. Babbage's Analytical Engine that he described in 1837 was a digital computer.
Jan
19
comment What do you call the facial expression or the state just before bursting into tears?
@Fard Within context, I think pout can certainly be sad enough. "The baby pouted then burst into tears"
Jan
5
comment “Love is for real” or “Love is real”
@Unknown It depends on context. I wouldn't consider "Love is for real" as being more romantic. It may even be less so, as "Love is real" is a more absolute and definitive statement.
Dec
22
comment How to spell and find razzu/razoo and its origin
I'm not sure that this question is appropriate for EL&U since it's not an English word, and may just be idiosyncratic to your mother. But to help, a little digging makes me think it must be related to the irish word rás which means race (ie. a sporting contest where the fastest wins.) Perhaps she was saying rás siúil which is a (walking) foot race.
Nov
13
comment How to pronounce 'question'
Agree. I don't believe it's a common pronunciation in North American English either. Perhaps the person in question was Sean Connery?
Nov
3
comment Idiomatic expression meaning to not reveal emotions
I'm always fascinated to hear colloquialisms I don't recall ever seeing. I live in central Canada and this expression is completely foreign to me.
Sep
1
comment History of '-itute' suffix?
@Mitch Most of them were taken straight from Latin during the English Renaissance.
Aug
31
comment History of '-itute' suffix?
I agree. I suppose one could to correct the question, or point out misconceptions in the question in the answer. I chose the second path. :)
Aug
31
comment History of '-itute' suffix?
I'm saying that statuere is a root, not a suffix. The words given originally came from latin words that modified the root word with prefixes, which have taken new meanings.
Jun
24
comment Suffix comparing more than 2 items composed of only 2 degrees of importance?
@TusharRaj In common usage, the superlative is often used even if there are only two items to compare. People refer to the youngest child even if there are only two offspring.
Jun
24
comment Suffix comparing more than 2 items composed of only 2 degrees of importance?
Related: english.stackexchange.com/questions/159297/… (duplicate?)
Jun
24
comment Suffix comparing more than 2 items composed of only 2 degrees of importance?
@Andrew In my opinion, you are overthinking it. Both would be equally valid.
Jun
24
comment Why people pronounce “penetrative” with two stresses?
Hmm. Like bib, I should have said it was /ˌɪnkəˈrɛkt/
Jun
24
comment Why people pronounce “penetrative” with two stresses?
Your assumption (most English words are supposed to be pronounced with one stress only) is incorrect.
Jun
16
comment How did phobia ever come to mean hatred?
@Lars Oh, I understand the confusion now. That sentence was meant to clarify the sort of religious people not classified as homophobic. I don't agree with the implied premise of the statement in context: that people are classified as homophobic just because they are morally opposed to homosexuality.
Jun
16
comment Term for Subversive, Passive-Aggressive Insults (In which the insulter has plausible deniability, concerning any actual effort at offense)
You used the term backhanded compliment in describing your question. What's wrong with that?
Jun
16
comment How did phobia ever come to mean hatred?
Thank you for proving that a good answer doesn't need to drag politics or opinion into it.
Jun
16
comment How did phobia ever come to mean hatred?
"most of the people classified as homophobic disapprove of homosexuality on moral or religious or social grounds." — I disagree. I know religious people who do not condone homosexual behaviour who treat everyone with love and compassion. Homophobia has been generally reserved for people who discriminate against or express antipathy and aversion towards those who are non-heterosexual.