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visits member for 4 years, 5 months
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Feb
9
comment Is there a single word for “becoming lucid”
As an aside, I would find the phrases "became lucid" or "becoming lucid" a bit odd and obtuse. I would more likely hear the phrase "became clear" or "becoming clear".
Jan
22
comment Antonym of “misnomer”
@EdwinAshworth Yes, that's why I try to qualify my statements with "serious english context" and "proper English word." Unless we're specifically talking about local slang or neologisms, it seems counterproductive to spread too wide a net in deciding what is an "English word".
Jan
22
comment Antonym of “misnomer”
@EdwinAshworth The way I define a proper English word is that it is found in the OED, Merriam-Webster, Cambridge, or other major dictionary. I don't consider the Urban Dictionary to be an authoritative resource. We could talk a lot about whatever utterances or slang that English speakers have ever used, but if they aren't understood by a significant portion of English speakers, I don't consider it a "serious" English word.
Jan
20
comment Antonym of “misnomer”
@Dreifot The important point is, however, that not all words have antonyms. There's no word that necessarily fits in every sentence construction with the opposite meaning of misnomer. In my example you might write "it would be appropriate to call the decade the Psychedelic 60s because…" (Or perhaps, tying everything together: "It would be an appropriate moniker to call…")
Jan
20
comment Antonym of “misnomer”
@Dreifort you would use the adjective form: The late 1960s were renowned for drug use in America. I don't think you've used misnomer quite correctly — mistake would be a better word choice in that next sentence you wrote. Misnomer is applied to a specific word or term, not a concept. You could instead say "it would be a misnomer to call the decade the Psychedelic 60s because…"
Dec
10
comment Is there a saying or proverb for a situation where the weakest party will always lose?
I came here to post that "survival of the fittest" as an answer, with the caveat that it is an oversimplification of evolutionary theory, but I like your word "corruption" even better. ;-)
Nov
26
comment Is there an inverse of the word “consignment”?
@tyler I think that first quoted paragraph is a good summary, and as plain as any English prose I've read. :)
Nov
6
comment antonym for beneficiary
@gwatson Contributor, an alternative in an answer below, fits your example, and is used commonly to refer to people who pay compulsory taxes.
Sep
9
comment Meaning/origin of “You bet” as a response to “Thank you”
@JefersonOliveira I've never felt that the phrase you bet was in any way rude or flippant. To me, it is a more enthusiastic response than a simple you're welcome. You bet means "you can bet on it" — it is a way of saying "you can always expect the same from me."
Sep
4
comment What is a group of cars on the road called?
@Mitch Really? Because it sounds perfectly comprehensible to me.
Jul
18
comment Men who are lured by the seductive beauty of women are called?
I would argue that the question did not specify that the "fooling" needed to be an intentional act by the female so the final point is moot.
Jul
18
comment Men who are lured by the seductive beauty of women are called?
This is more of a philosophical answer than a literal one. No dictionary is going to include the definition "Human: one who is lured by the seductive beauty of the opposite sex".
Jul
16
comment Word to Warn of Danger of Usage
hazardous is the word often used in this context.
Jul
9
comment Legos not LEGO?
@Eno Bullocks. ;) I find that hard to believe. Probably the very first trademarked words to become generic, linoleum, was invented by an Englishman. The word sellotape is used instead of Scotch Tape (adhesive tape) in England, Ireland, Australia and many other countries. Hoover is still a trademark in the US, but is now generic in the UK…
Jul
7
comment What does “vanilla” mean in the context of gaming?
I find it ironic that what I find is one of the most interesting and enjoyable flavours has come to mean "bare minimum" or "no-frills" flavour.
Jun
18
comment What does “v.” stand for?
@ArashMousavi If you follow the hyperlink, you'll see that the case was Robert Eli Stanley against the State of Georgia.
Jun
18
comment What does “v.” stand for?
@vickyace Nope. See my answer. Initials are uppercase, a lowercase v. points towards a legal case.
Jun
18
comment What is the correct term for “rubbing statues' parts for luck”?
@AntonTykhyy You may find the term too general, but it's unlikely that you'll find a more specific term in English.
Jun
17
comment What does a series of dots (elipses) mean after a sentence?
@seabird The punctuation mark you are speaking about. The ellipsis
Jun
16
comment Why don't Americans have British accents?
@JimBeam Your premise is flawed. Americans do sound closer to Brits than not. Compare the difference between British English and American English, which started diverging 400 years ago, with this reading of Chaucer which is only 200 years older than that. Language changes faster than you realize.