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location Saskatoon, Canada
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visits member for 4 years, 1 month
seen Dec 16 at 20:28

Dec
10
comment Is there a saying or proverb for a situation where the weakest party will always lose?
I came here to post that "survival of the fittest" as an answer, with the caveat that it is an oversimplification of evolutionary theory, but I like your word "corruption" even better. ;-)
Nov
26
comment Is there an inverse of the word “consignment”?
@tyler I think that first quoted paragraph is a good summary, and as plain as any English prose I've read. :)
Nov
6
comment antonym for beneficiary
@gwatson Contributor, an alternative in an answer below, fits your example, and is used commonly to refer to people who pay compulsory taxes.
Sep
9
comment Meaning/origin of “You bet” as a response to “Thank you”
@JefersonOliveira I've never felt that the phrase you bet was in any way rude or flippant. To me, it is a more enthusiastic response than a simple you're welcome. You bet means "you can bet on it" — it is a way of saying "you can always expect the same from me."
Sep
4
comment What is a group of cars on the road called?
@Mitch Really? Because it sounds perfectly comprehensible to me.
Jul
18
comment Men who are lured by the seductive beauty of women are called?
I would argue that the question did not specify that the "fooling" needed to be an intentional act by the female so the final point is moot.
Jul
18
comment Men who are lured by the seductive beauty of women are called?
This is more of a philosophical answer than a literal one. No dictionary is going to include the definition "Human: one who is lured by the seductive beauty of the opposite sex".
Jul
16
comment Word to Warn of Danger of Usage
hazardous is the word often used in this context.
Jul
9
comment Legos not LEGO?
@Eno Bullocks. ;) I find that hard to believe. Probably the very first trademarked words to become generic, linoleum, was invented by an Englishman. The word sellotape is used instead of Scotch Tape (adhesive tape) in England, Ireland, Australia and many other countries. Hoover is still a trademark in the US, but is now generic in the UK…
Jul
7
comment What does “vanilla” mean in the context of gaming?
I find it ironic that what I find is one of the most interesting and enjoyable flavours has come to mean "bare minimum" or "no-frills" flavour.
Jun
18
comment What does “v.” stand for?
@ArashMousavi If you follow the hyperlink, you'll see that the case was Robert Eli Stanley against the State of Georgia.
Jun
18
comment What does “v.” stand for?
@vickyace Nope. See my answer. Initials are uppercase, a lowercase v. points towards a legal case.
Jun
18
comment What is the correct term for “rubbing statues' parts for luck”?
@AntonTykhyy You may find the term too general, but it's unlikely that you'll find a more specific term in English.
Jun
17
comment What does a series of dots (elipses) mean after a sentence?
@seabird The punctuation mark you are speaking about. The ellipsis
Jun
16
comment Why don't Americans have British accents?
@JimBeam Your premise is flawed. Americans do sound closer to Brits than not. Compare the difference between British English and American English, which started diverging 400 years ago, with this reading of Chaucer which is only 200 years older than that. Language changes faster than you realize.
Jun
11
comment “I and Jane” or “me and Jane”?
@bye You make a good point, and since I'm not generally a prescriptivist, I don't find the me and X compound subject as grating as, for example, I seen her at the store.
May
21
comment Is “Upload from XML” valid in English?
@Hugo Are you taking part of the list or the entire list? If you only upload part of the list, using the word from makes sense. Otherwise, it does not. Using the word from implies there is a second step where you select specific lines (records) from the file to upload. If this is the case, use from.
May
21
comment Is “Upload from XML” valid in English?
@Hugo To be clear, the from is unnecessary. The payload is the file, you aren't taking anything away from it.
May
21
comment Is “Upload from XML” valid in English?
@Hugo Would it make sense to label a button "Activate the Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation Device"? No. People would be confused. "Power the Laser" would make sense. Would you also use "Upload a Joint Photographic Experts Group compressed image"? No. Your friend is right, the common phrase for an XML file is just that: an XML file.
May
21
comment Is “Upload from XML” valid in English?
Spelling out XML or CSV is not only wordy and confusing, but also completely unnecessary. If the user doesn't immediately recognize what an XML or CSV file is, then the odds of them actually supplying a valid XML or CSV file are vanishingly remote.