10,135 reputation
11735
bio website
location Saskatoon, Canada
age
visits member for 3 years, 5 months
seen 9 hours ago

Aug
15
comment A word that describes something that has been given a name
I'll upvote yours and appellation.
Aug
15
awarded  meaning
Aug
14
comment A term for introductory phrases that qualify reality/veracity?
Instead of just calling them a "qualifying introductory phrase" couldn't you just say they're a qualifier?
Aug
14
answered Is there an abstract word for the environment in which a vehicle can move?
Aug
14
awarded  Nice Answer
Aug
13
answered Word to describe “a person who is only wishful to help others and cares little about themself”?
Aug
13
answered Opposite of change?
Jul
31
awarded  Enlightened
Jul
31
comment Comma or no comma before “only”?
Related (duplicate?): english.stackexchange.com/questions/8109/…
Jul
31
revised Using “that” to describe everything.. Is this incorrect, or poor grammar?
deleted 9 characters in body
Jul
31
comment Using “that” to describe everything.. Is this incorrect, or poor grammar?
@JohnLawler Agreed, there are other thats. I was addressing the particular that in the examples given in CrossFit games which all seemed to be determiners. I'll rephrase.
Jul
31
revised Using “that” to describe everything.. Is this incorrect, or poor grammar?
deleted 9 characters in body
Jul
31
answered Using “that” to describe everything.. Is this incorrect, or poor grammar?
Jul
31
comment Where did the adage, “Love the sinner, hate the sin,” come from?
@FumbleFingers Yoichi Oishi did mention in his question that he thought the source of this adage was the Bible, but then he learned it wasn't. Therefore, I tried to answer the question in that context: where was the ultimate source of the expression, not when was it first written or said in English with that exact phrasing.
Jul
31
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
31
awarded  etymology
Jul
31
comment How can I spell out Pope Francis’s remark on gay priests, ‘Who am I to judge?’
It should also be noted that "Who am I to judge?" is not an uncommon phrase in English.
Jul
31
answered Where did the adage, “Love the sinner, hate the sin,” come from?
Jul
31
comment Idiom for someone who forgets their roots
"A rolling stone gathers no moss" can also refer to a person who changes locations, jobs, careers, etc. so much that they don't accumulate any wealth. The way I've most thought of it is that an active, vibrant person who lives life to the fullest isn't weighed down by baggage or other signs of stagnation. But I have no idea if this is a common or correct interpretation… :)
Jul
31
answered Idiom for someone who forgets their roots