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Mar
15
revised Why do we “paint the town red”?
added 315 characters in body
Mar
15
comment Why do we “paint the town red”?
Bah, I still think the Marquis of Waterford tale is apocryphal. At best the town was indeed painted red, but this was not the origin of the phrase: a link was drawn after the phrase became popular. There is no evidence the saying originated in the UK, in fact, most evidence points to a US origin. See: ngrams.googlelabs.com/… and ngrams.googlelabs.com/…
Mar
14
answered Is “these are also hidden features as well” a redundant sentence?
Mar
9
answered Why do we “paint the town red”?
Mar
9
answered What's the name of this kind of act?
Mar
9
answered More idioms like “needle in a haystack” relevant to hidden/hard to find items?
Mar
9
comment More idioms like “needle in a haystack” relevant to hidden/hard to find items?
That's a new one. Very colourful!
Mar
8
comment Using the definite article before a country/state name
Quibble and FYI. The Dominion of Canada was never an official formal name and fell out of use after WWII, although it did appear on some official documents up to 1967. The Canada Act of 1982 made the official, formal name of Canada simply: Canada.
Mar
8
answered What is the difference between “monologue” and “soliloquy”?
Mar
7
comment How do you pluralize abbreviations of metric names (e.g. “kilo”)?
@Jimi mil is also used in engineering as an abbreviation for a thousandth of an inch. I would avoid using it.
Mar
5
comment How to pronounce “E = mc²”
Or here: aip.org/history/einstein/sound/voice1.mp3
Mar
3
comment Singular form for “headphones”?
Agree. "She wore headphones in one ear and listened to him with the other" is perfectly understandable as would be "she was interrupted while dressing and was wearing her pants on one leg."
Mar
3
comment How is vehicle fuel efficiency expressed outside the United States?
FYI, the General Conference on Weights and Measures in 1979 adopted the additional symbol L for "liter" to avoid any confusion with the numeral 1. This has become the preferred symbol in North America.
Mar
3
answered Substitute for F*** in emphasizing disbelief, anger, etc
Mar
2
comment “Luck”, “coincidence”, “chance” — most appropriate in this situation?
@The Raven Of course, now that I posted that I realize you mean "I found my X by luck" is non-idiomatic, not just "by luck." Even then, I respectfully disagree. I would use "by chance" if I wasn't actively looking for/missing something, but If I were looking for something and somehow stumbled upon it in an unlikely location, I could imagine exclaiming "I found my missing X purely by luck!"
Mar
2
comment “Luck”, “coincidence”, “chance” — most appropriate in this situation?
@The Raven I'm with @Robusto on this. I don't think by luck is non-idiomatic. A simple google search for "by luck" returns many results. In fact, the phrase would sound far more natural to me than by chance in several situations: "Did you win that game of darts by luck or by skill?"
Mar
2
revised What is the correct usage of “whom”?
spelling: sentence
Mar
1
answered Looking for the name of a type of painting
Feb
28
answered What is an alternative for “thank you”?
Feb
25
comment A generic word to define the superset of companies, NGOs and faculties
That's funny, I would have thought it the other way around. A group is a more specific entity. After all, I am an entity, and not a group. :)