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May
24
comment Alternative to “lossily compressed”
In that context, what's wrong with being specific and stating the images were jpeg compressed? Or if you wanted to emphasize the lossiness: jpeg compressed (lossy) would work. Indeed that wouldn't be necessary, since you emphasize your worry about losing more information later in the paragraph…
May
20
comment What does the suffix “-saurus” mean?
Although I didn't vote down this answer, if I could I would have voted down the remark "Thank you for using your brain."
May
20
comment What does the suffix “-saurus” mean?
While I did not personally mark it down, I can see the argument. The latin root of thesaurus is derived from greek, which invalidates the concluding paragraph. Also, any answer which includes the words "assuming" and "presumably" is suspect. The first paragraph is vague and not properly researched. Linguistically, there's no reason to assume the first half of thesaurus means "treasure" and the second half "store". My understanding is that thēsauros is synonymous with hoard.
May
4
answered Is there a saying in English corresponding to “Another loach under the willow tree”?
Apr
27
answered “Have a look” vs. “Take a look”
Apr
26
comment What words can I use to indicate how hungry I am?
I take it you're not a child of the eighties then?
Apr
19
comment Did Shakespeare really invent 1700 words?
@Mild Fuzz I'm going to take the other side of that argument. The English language is very much in flux right now. 90,000 words were added to the English dictionary in the 20th century, increasing the vocabulary by about 25%.
Apr
17
comment Where is the stress in the word “commenting”?
If you did stress the second syllable of comment or commenting this would be a sure sign that you are not a native English speaker. Unlike some other languages, in English stress is both lexical (is part of the word and must be memorized) and phonemic (different stress produces different words, even if they have the same consonant sounds: as in desert and dessert.)
Apr
17
answered Different syllabic boundaries in various dictionaries?
Apr
15
comment What is the definition and origin of “imba”?
@Cereberus Looks better.
Apr
15
comment What is the definition and origin of “imba”?
Why don't you edit your answer then? The word clearly comes from imbalanced (the state of being out of equilibrium) and has nothing to do with unbalanced, in-balanced, or those other things. ;-)
Apr
11
comment What exactly does “President Obama will ‘fold faster than a lawn chair’” mean?
There's also the classic "fold like a house of cards."
Apr
6
comment “convey” vs. “say”
I agree with "I don't express it well" but I think your rewrite has a different meaning. Your rewrite implies that it would be easier if you could explain it better, whereas the original meaning is "it's easier than it sounds, I'm just incapable of explaining its ease."
Apr
3
answered What is the meaning of P.S. in a name?
Apr
3
answered Use of “untick”/“uncheck” in Canadian English?
Apr
1
awarded  Enlightened
Mar
31
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
31
answered How did the “-ish” suffix come to denote the approximate meaning of the word it is attached to?
Mar
30
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
26
comment Where does “pull it off” come from?
My intuition is that it started with reference to a robbery (perhaps train?) or heist and went to sports from that direction. Or perhaps magic? The way you pull off a curtain and something disappears? Still digging!