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Feb
23
answered Is the term “blind spot” something that only native English speakers would understand?
Feb
23
comment Is the term “blind spot” something that only native English speakers would understand?
@Martha I have lots of criticisms for Photoshop, but I'm not sure what you mean. A quick search of the help files shows that mask is indeed always referring to… well to use the technical term, masking things. You might as well complain about Photoshop's extensive use of the word "size."
Feb
23
comment What does ‘[Ronald Reagan’s] colossus with gilded pecs, red-painted smile and an NRA-approved pistol in his fist' mean?
I think @Robusto answered this well, but I'll just note that I think you're reading too much into the timing of Reagan articles. I don't think it's directly related to frustration, It's mostly simply the fact that what would have been his 100th birthday recently passed. The article in question is critical of people who would co-opt Reagan's image to put forward their own agendas.
Feb
22
answered Are there English sayings that correspond to the old Japanese saying, ‘There is no wild pig larger than the mountain from where he emerges’?
Feb
22
comment Better synonym for “actionable”?
@chaos That's my point, "actionable" is devoid of content. What sort of item is not actionable? What makes the item actionable? To come up with a replacement, we need to know what makes the item "special."
Feb
22
answered Better synonym for “actionable”?
Feb
22
comment Is an apostrophe with a decade (e.g. 1920’s) generally considered “incorrect”?
related: What is the correct way to pluralize an acronym? and Is “ 's ” ever correct for pluralization?
Feb
21
comment Is it correct to say “cold temperature”?
@ShreevatsaR Could you say that 30 km/h is a slower speed than 60 km/h? Why can't you say that -20°C is a colder temperature than 30°C?
Feb
21
comment Is it correct to say “cold temperature”?
Saying that you cannot use "hot" or "cold" to describe temperature is hogwash. You can say you are travelling at a high/low speed or fast/slow speed, similarly you can say that chicken is cooking at a high/low temperature or a hot/warm/cold temperature.
Feb
17
comment Name for an electrical element to use multiple appliances on the same plug
Power bars in Canada.
Feb
17
revised Name for an electrical element to use multiple appliances on the same plug
added 22 characters in body
Feb
17
comment Name for an electrical element to use multiple appliances on the same plug
@advs89 it's true the energy bar has usurped the phrase. However, up here in the Great White North, power bar is not an uncommon term. :) canadiantire.ca/AST/browse/7/Electronics/TVsAccessories/…
Feb
17
revised What would be a a linguistic term for those nouns ending with -ing?
added 10 characters in body
Feb
17
comment What would be a a linguistic term for those nouns ending with -ing?
@Kosmonaut I had just updated the answer as you were adding that comment, thanks. :)
Feb
17
revised What would be a a linguistic term for those nouns ending with -ing?
added 712 characters in body; added 44 characters in body
Feb
17
comment What would be a a linguistic term for those nouns ending with -ing?
@Ben "Fencing" when referring to the sporting activity is indeed a Gerund. "Fencing" as in the white picket fence surrounding a house, is not. I like building bridges is a gerund. The Empire State Building is not. Same holds for scaffolding, and ending. I guess I just assumed that was what the question was pointing towards…
Feb
17
answered Name for an electrical element to use multiple appliances on the same plug
Feb
17
revised What would be a a linguistic term for those nouns ending with -ing?
added 640 characters in body
Feb
17
answered What would be a a linguistic term for those nouns ending with -ing?
Feb
16
answered Are the speakers in this video speaking standard American English?