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location Saskatoon, Canada
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Jan
31
comment Why do people use “I hear that…” when talking about the past?
I don't agree that this distinction can be made. Hear/Heard don't really differentiate in terms of recency to me.
Jan
27
comment What's the word for “overly proud of your education”?
I like pretentious. It has the self-importance aspect and condescension built in.
Jan
27
comment What's the word for “overly proud of your education”?
Hmm. After reading some comments and answers to this question I'm struck at how silly and self-referential this question is. Don't use an obscure, erudite word in place of blank… ;-)
Jan
27
comment What's the word for “overly proud of your education”?
@tryaria Well, there's a problem with trying to find a more obscure word than condescending, which conveys nicely the concern that you may have a patronizing tone and are trying to sound overly educated… can you guess what that problem might be? ;-)
Jan
27
comment What's the word for “overly proud of your education”?
This could fit, but to me a pedant is someone overly concerned with trivial errors at the expense of the big picture. When you're pedantic you're pointing out flaws that are largely irrelevant to the communication. I'm not sure that's the meaning he's trying to get across. But that's just me, perhaps there's more layers of meaning to the word and I'm being too… pedantic.
Jan
27
answered What's the word for “overly proud of your education”?
Jan
27
comment Is the verb “redouble” just a redundant way to say “double”?
It may be a poor substitute, but people don't say double our efforts. It's simply a trite expression in the same vein as we need to give 110%.
Jan
26
comment Is there a good substitute for the word “scarper” in American English?
@ukayer I think scram would work in the context you presented. Quick, let's scram before the boss comes back.
Jan
26
answered Is there a good substitute for the word “scarper” in American English?
Jan
26
comment Is “a friend of his” a used phrase?
@Colin That's going a bit far, I've heard many english speakers say that. Perhaps incorrectly sometimes, but it would be perfectly good english to say (for example) "he should make a friend of him, not an enemy."
Jan
26
awarded  Populist
Jan
25
answered When to use “GOP” versus “Republican Party”
Jan
24
comment What's the difference between “deserve” and “need”?
@Jasper At the risk of getting overly analytical and geeky I'll point out how perfectly this ending relates to the other "heroes" in the movie. "The Joker", a sociopath bent on punishment of Gotham, and "Harvey Dent", paragon of justice (before he was transformed) are both "heroes" Gotham didn't deserve… so Gotham got what it needed.
Jan
24
revised What's the difference between “deserve” and “need”?
deleted 1 characters in body
Jan
24
comment What's the deal with “colonel”?
And don't get me started on the British and Canadian pronunciation of lieutenant ;-)
Jan
24
comment Why is the “ph” pronounced like a “v” in “Stephen”? Is this the only word like that?
@romkyns Yes, it's interesting, and I'm not certain. For what it's worth, Forvo has three pronunciations, and while the British speaker is distinctly f sounding, the New Zealand pronunciation sounds, to my ear, like v. forvo.com/word/nephew/#en
Jan
24
answered Was the word “nigger” an expletive in Mark Twain's day?
Jan
24
answered What's the difference between “deserve” and “need”?
Jan
24
comment What's the difference between “deserve” and “need”?
Deserve can also mean earn the punishment for something based on your actions -- I will explain more in my answer.
Jan
24
answered Why is the “ph” pronounced like a “v” in “Stephen”? Is this the only word like that?