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visits member for 3 years, 11 months
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Mar
2
comment “Luck”, “coincidence”, “chance” — most appropriate in this situation?
@The Raven I'm with @Robusto on this. I don't think by luck is non-idiomatic. A simple google search for "by luck" returns many results. In fact, the phrase would sound far more natural to me than by chance in several situations: "Did you win that game of darts by luck or by skill?"
Mar
2
revised What is the correct usage of “whom”?
spelling: sentence
Mar
1
answered Looking for the name of a type of painting
Feb
28
answered What is an alternative for “thank you”?
Feb
25
comment A generic word to define the superset of companies, NGOs and faculties
That's funny, I would have thought it the other way around. A group is a more specific entity. After all, I am an entity, and not a group. :)
Feb
25
answered A generic word to define the superset of companies, NGOs and faculties
Feb
25
answered What's a word for an instance in which one has an opinion about something without having tried it?
Feb
24
answered What is a word for a person who has been initiated into secret knowledge (apprentice, ___, master)?
Feb
24
comment What's the recommended way to refer to the September 11 attacks in formal writing?
I see, so you're using should in the sense of there aught to be rather than pointing out that it's usually written that way. ;-) Personally, I think you're being too prescriptive. A hyphen isn't needed in compound adjectives if there is no ambiguity. (e.g. Saturday morning cartoons.) -- Even more so with dates. No one writes July-fourth celebrations.
Feb
24
comment What's the recommended way to refer to the September 11 attacks in formal writing?
Why should there be a hyphen? I don't recall ever seeing it written in print with a hyphen…
Feb
24
answered What's the recommended way to refer to the September 11 attacks in formal writing?
Feb
23
answered Is the term “blind spot” something that only native English speakers would understand?
Feb
23
comment Is the term “blind spot” something that only native English speakers would understand?
@Martha I have lots of criticisms for Photoshop, but I'm not sure what you mean. A quick search of the help files shows that mask is indeed always referring to… well to use the technical term, masking things. You might as well complain about Photoshop's extensive use of the word "size."
Feb
23
comment What does ‘[Ronald Reagan’s] colossus with gilded pecs, red-painted smile and an NRA-approved pistol in his fist' mean?
I think @Robusto answered this well, but I'll just note that I think you're reading too much into the timing of Reagan articles. I don't think it's directly related to frustration, It's mostly simply the fact that what would have been his 100th birthday recently passed. The article in question is critical of people who would co-opt Reagan's image to put forward their own agendas.
Feb
22
answered Are there English sayings that correspond to the old Japanese saying, ‘There is no wild pig larger than the mountain from where he emerges’?
Feb
22
comment Better synonym for “actionable”?
@chaos That's my point, "actionable" is devoid of content. What sort of item is not actionable? What makes the item actionable? To come up with a replacement, we need to know what makes the item "special."
Feb
22
answered Better synonym for “actionable”?
Feb
22
comment Is an apostrophe with a decade (e.g. 1920’s) generally considered “incorrect”?
related: What is the correct way to pluralize an acronym? and Is “ 's ” ever correct for pluralization?
Feb
21
comment Is it correct to say “cold temperature”?
@ShreevatsaR Could you say that 30 km/h is a slower speed than 60 km/h? Why can't you say that -20°C is a colder temperature than 30°C?
Feb
21
comment Is it correct to say “cold temperature”?
Saying that you cannot use "hot" or "cold" to describe temperature is hogwash. You can say you are travelling at a high/low speed or fast/slow speed, similarly you can say that chicken is cooking at a high/low temperature or a hot/warm/cold temperature.