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Jun
22
comment Is there a term to describe speech that has a hidden meaning but is not sarcastic?
It's a good word, but your example doesn't include the irony I believe the question is asking for. Hmm, but maybe if you wrote: "So glad you could make it!" she chided. I'd give you the +1 ;-)
Jun
22
revised Can adjectives be placed without a noun after them?
added 114 characters in body
Jun
22
comment Can adjectives be placed without a noun after them?
I agree that it's unnecessary to assume elision.
Jun
22
answered Can adjectives be placed without a noun after them?
Jun
16
comment Is there a single noun, preferably not a gerund, for the act of exceeding or surpassing?
@Unreason There's no need to try and shoehorn the word into a particular construction. Consider: "Our profits exceeded expectations. This excellence was quite remarkable." or "This grade of steel surpasses the tensile strength required to build the structure. Its excellency was determined by an experiment which… blah blah"
Jun
16
answered How do you respond back to “Hi, How is it going?”
Jun
15
revised “How big of a problem” vs. “how big a problem”
more research.; deleted 4 characters in body
Jun
15
answered “How big of a problem” vs. “how big a problem”
Jun
15
comment “How big of a problem” vs. “how big a problem”
"Not that loud of a noise" sounds perfectly fine to me and in fact brings more google hits than "not that loud a noise"…
Jun
15
comment Using the expression “the same” for a previously mentioned item
I think most people would simply replace "the same" with "them" in that example sentence and there would still be no ambiguity or confusion.
Jun
15
answered Where is the root morpheme in Modern English evacuate and vacuum?
Jun
15
comment Is there a single noun, preferably not a gerund, for the act of exceeding or surpassing?
+1 excellence or excellency is the correct answer, depending on context.
Jun
14
comment “when you are done” vs. “when you are through” vs. “when you are finished”
I'm with Mitch. I'm not familiar with the colloquial usage of suss here (Australianism?), I'm only familiar with the verb meaning to "figure out" or "divine".
Jun
14
comment What does “In some ways” exactly mean?
I agree. Somehow is specific to something singular or something abstract.
Jun
14
revised What does “In some ways” exactly mean?
added 198 characters in body
Jun
14
answered What does “In some ways” exactly mean?
Jun
14
comment Use of “facetious”
This is good analysis, but the second half of the student's sentence just one that would allow me to pass implies that it's not the request that they are trying to qualify with the word facetious, but rather the appropriateness of the change — which of course makes facetious the wrong word to use. I think the better rephrasing would be something like "I am not asking for a (ludicrous|preposterous|ridiculous|excessive|extravagant) grade change, just one that would allow me to pass."
Jun
14
comment Use of “facetious”
Frankly, I think this student is unfamiliar with the meaning of facetious. It's a poor choice here. The best word I can think of that fits the intended meaning is preposterous.
Jun
14
comment What is the difference between “filtrated” and “filtered”?
+1 As a verb, filtrate has a very specific meaning: to remove by passing through a filter. The verb filter as this meaning too, but it can also simply mean pass through or flow slowly.
Jun
10
comment What does “not having a pair” mean?
I'm not against political correctness, but to be fair, testosterone is chemically linked to assertiveness, even in women. Females get it from their ovaries, males get it from their testes. (Mostly, some comes from the adrenal glands.) Therefore, the phrase is particularly apt. In my experience, females I know have no particular problem with this turn of phrase.