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location Saskatoon, Canada
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visits member for 3 years, 5 months
seen Apr 17 at 18:39

Feb
2
comment Why are there two pronunciations for “either”?
Interesting observation, and I agree. I think it "sounds better" because of the vowel agreement between me/I and neither.
Feb
2
comment When should I use “is” and when should I use “are”?
@cindi Not all verb conjugations in other languages are necessarily unique depending on plurality of subject…
Feb
2
answered “Pretty” as an adverb
Feb
2
answered Abbreviations for nouns / noun phrases used as non-nouns
Feb
2
comment literally as a hyperbole
When enough people make the mistake, it becomes correct. Language evolves. Not that I don't agree with you, however… :)
Feb
2
answered literally as a hyperbole
Feb
2
answered “the same” and “that particular one”
Feb
2
comment Is it wrong to say “Music Concert”?
Manoochehr's comment agreeing with Robusto is also redundant as well.
Feb
2
comment Variations of the word “Schadenfreude”
@Jasper Great point. Here I've always thought the derivation of the word was the same as dessert but evidently that word comes from the French desservir "to clear the table" whereas desert in the sense of punishment/reward comes from Old French deservir "to deserve"
Feb
1
awarded  Quorum
Feb
1
answered Legos not LEGO?
Jan
31
comment When to use “Well” or “Good”
@Andrew Point taken, but I think "I'm doing good" has the sense of "I'm doing good (things)"
Jan
31
answered When to use “Well” or “Good”
Jan
31
comment What do Americans think of using 'cheers' to sign off an email?
Odd, I've seen it used so much (and use it myself) as an informal end to an email that I no longer see it as particularly British. To me it's perfectly understandable as it is used in a toast: "cheers!" clink. Mind you, I'm Canadian. Maybe it's even more British to american sensibilities.
Jan
31
comment What do Americans think of using 'cheers' to sign off an email?
Related: english.stackexchange.com/questions/332/how-to-end-an-email
Jan
31
comment What is the closest alternative to “rubbish” in American English?
+1 suitable both when you're speaking of household waste and the more figurative, derisive sense of useless things/ideas.
Jan
31
answered What is the origin of “cross country skiing”?
Jan
31
answered Why is “ass” considered obscene?
Jan
31
answered What's a word that can be used when something, such as a document, is purposely bland?
Jan
31
answered Why do people use “I hear that…” when talking about the past?