10,800 reputation
12042
bio website
location Saskatoon, Canada
age
visits member for 4 years
seen Nov 20 at 14:50

Mar
8
comment Using the definite article before a country/state name
Quibble and FYI. The Dominion of Canada was never an official formal name and fell out of use after WWII, although it did appear on some official documents up to 1967. The Canada Act of 1982 made the official, formal name of Canada simply: Canada.
Mar
8
answered What is the difference between “monologue” and “soliloquy”?
Mar
7
comment How do you pluralize abbreviations of metric names (e.g. “kilo”)?
@Jimi mil is also used in engineering as an abbreviation for a thousandth of an inch. I would avoid using it.
Mar
5
comment How to pronounce “E = mc²”
Or here: aip.org/history/einstein/sound/voice1.mp3
Mar
3
comment Singular form for “headphones”?
Agree. "She wore headphones in one ear and listened to him with the other" is perfectly understandable as would be "she was interrupted while dressing and was wearing her pants on one leg."
Mar
3
comment How is vehicle fuel efficiency expressed outside the United States?
FYI, the General Conference on Weights and Measures in 1979 adopted the additional symbol L for "liter" to avoid any confusion with the numeral 1. This has become the preferred symbol in North America.
Mar
3
answered Substitute for F*** in emphasizing disbelief, anger, etc
Mar
2
comment “Luck”, “coincidence”, “chance” — most appropriate in this situation?
@The Raven Of course, now that I posted that I realize you mean "I found my X by luck" is non-idiomatic, not just "by luck." Even then, I respectfully disagree. I would use "by chance" if I wasn't actively looking for/missing something, but If I were looking for something and somehow stumbled upon it in an unlikely location, I could imagine exclaiming "I found my missing X purely by luck!"
Mar
2
comment “Luck”, “coincidence”, “chance” — most appropriate in this situation?
@The Raven I'm with @Robusto on this. I don't think by luck is non-idiomatic. A simple google search for "by luck" returns many results. In fact, the phrase would sound far more natural to me than by chance in several situations: "Did you win that game of darts by luck or by skill?"
Mar
2
revised What is the correct usage of “whom”?
spelling: sentence
Mar
1
answered Looking for the name of a type of painting
Feb
28
answered What is an alternative for “thank you”?
Feb
25
comment A generic word to define the superset of companies, NGOs and faculties
That's funny, I would have thought it the other way around. A group is a more specific entity. After all, I am an entity, and not a group. :)
Feb
25
answered A generic word to define the superset of companies, NGOs and faculties
Feb
25
answered What's a word for an instance in which one has an opinion about something without having tried it?
Feb
24
answered What is a word for a person who has been initiated into secret knowledge (apprentice, ___, master)?
Feb
24
comment What's the recommended way to refer to the September 11 attacks in formal writing?
I see, so you're using should in the sense of there aught to be rather than pointing out that it's usually written that way. ;-) Personally, I think you're being too prescriptive. A hyphen isn't needed in compound adjectives if there is no ambiguity. (e.g. Saturday morning cartoons.) -- Even more so with dates. No one writes July-fourth celebrations.
Feb
24
comment What's the recommended way to refer to the September 11 attacks in formal writing?
Why should there be a hyphen? I don't recall ever seeing it written in print with a hyphen…
Feb
24
answered What's the recommended way to refer to the September 11 attacks in formal writing?
Feb
23
answered Is the term “blind spot” something that only native English speakers would understand?