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Mar
22
answered Are there nouns that are always plural — have no plural counterpart?
Mar
18
comment Why do golfers yell: “Fore”?
From what I've read, the term "fore-caddy" has the most plausibility. The golfer would yell at the fore-caddy to look for the incoming ball, and I reckon it would take one round to shorten "FORECADDY!" to "FORE!"
Mar
18
answered Meaning of “par”?
Mar
16
comment Would you say “it's impolite” to your kids?
I think many of our rules of propriety and "politeness" relate to cleanliness. If I were in a mood to have a discussion with my child, I could certainly go into detail about why certain taboos exist. However, a restaurant might not be an appropriate place for such a discussion. You give children too little credit, saying "it's impolite" should be enough and the child would fill in the blanks later.
Mar
16
comment What is the question form of “used to do”?
Your examples #1, #3 and #4 are directly contradicted by the example in your link: "Did you use to smoke?" Read the EnglishClub tip box.
Mar
15
revised Why do we “paint the town red”?
add link to Google Books
Mar
15
revised Why do we “paint the town red”?
added 315 characters in body
Mar
15
comment Why do we “paint the town red”?
Bah, I still think the Marquis of Waterford tale is apocryphal. At best the town was indeed painted red, but this was not the origin of the phrase: a link was drawn after the phrase became popular. There is no evidence the saying originated in the UK, in fact, most evidence points to a US origin. See: ngrams.googlelabs.com/… and ngrams.googlelabs.com/…
Mar
14
answered Is “these are also hidden features as well” a redundant sentence?
Mar
9
answered Why do we “paint the town red”?
Mar
9
answered What's the name of this kind of act?
Mar
9
answered More idioms like “needle in a haystack” relevant to hidden/hard to find items?
Mar
9
comment More idioms like “needle in a haystack” relevant to hidden/hard to find items?
That's a new one. Very colourful!
Mar
8
comment Using the definite article before a country/state name
Quibble and FYI. The Dominion of Canada was never an official formal name and fell out of use after WWII, although it did appear on some official documents up to 1967. The Canada Act of 1982 made the official, formal name of Canada simply: Canada.
Mar
8
answered What is the difference between “monologue” and “soliloquy”?
Mar
7
comment How do you pluralize abbreviations of metric names (e.g. “kilo”)?
@Jimi mil is also used in engineering as an abbreviation for a thousandth of an inch. I would avoid using it.
Mar
5
comment How to pronounce “E = mc²”
Or here: aip.org/history/einstein/sound/voice1.mp3
Mar
3
comment Singular form for “headphones”?
Agree. "She wore headphones in one ear and listened to him with the other" is perfectly understandable as would be "she was interrupted while dressing and was wearing her pants on one leg."
Mar
3
comment How is vehicle fuel efficiency expressed outside the United States?
FYI, the General Conference on Weights and Measures in 1979 adopted the additional symbol L for "liter" to avoid any confusion with the numeral 1. This has become the preferred symbol in North America.
Mar
3
answered Substitute for F*** in emphasizing disbelief, anger, etc