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visits member for 3 years, 10 months
seen 19 hours ago

Jun
17
answered What word is this?
Jun
17
comment What does a series of dots (elipses) mean after a sentence?
@seabird The punctuation mark you are speaking about. The ellipsis
Jun
16
comment Why don't Americans have British accents?
@JimBeam Your premise is flawed. Americans do sound closer to Brits than not. Compare the difference between British English and American English, which started diverging 400 years ago, with this reading of Chaucer which is only 200 years older than that. Language changes faster than you realize.
Jun
11
comment “I and Jane” or “me and Jane”?
@bye You make a good point, and since I'm not generally a prescriptivist, I don't find the me and X compound subject as grating as, for example, I seen her at the store.
Jun
10
revised “I and Jane” or “me and Jane”?
added 418 characters in body
Jun
10
answered “I and Jane” or “me and Jane”?
May
23
revised Why does English need an article before any noun?
added 856 characters in body
May
23
answered Why does English need an article before any noun?
May
21
comment Is “Upload from XML” valid in English?
@Hugo Are you taking part of the list or the entire list? If you only upload part of the list, using the word from makes sense. Otherwise, it does not. Using the word from implies there is a second step where you select specific lines (records) from the file to upload. If this is the case, use from.
May
21
comment Is “Upload from XML” valid in English?
@Hugo To be clear, the from is unnecessary. The payload is the file, you aren't taking anything away from it.
May
21
comment Is “Upload from XML” valid in English?
@Hugo Would it make sense to label a button "Activate the Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation Device"? No. People would be confused. "Power the Laser" would make sense. Would you also use "Upload a Joint Photographic Experts Group compressed image"? No. Your friend is right, the common phrase for an XML file is just that: an XML file.
May
21
comment Is “Upload from XML” valid in English?
Spelling out XML or CSV is not only wordy and confusing, but also completely unnecessary. If the user doesn't immediately recognize what an XML or CSV file is, then the odds of them actually supplying a valid XML or CSV file are vanishingly remote.
May
21
comment Why do people say “over-” and “underwhelmed” but never just “whelmed”?
She was underwhelmed, if that's a word / I know it's not 'cause I looked it up / That's one of those skills / That I learned in my school
May
21
comment Expression from “Lord of the Flies” that I cannot understand
FYI the scar is referring to the crash site: the boys crashed in an airplane. It's a "scar" because it is the violent destruction of the pristine jungle. The violent imagery foreshadows events to come.
May
21
comment Expression from “Lord of the Flies” that I cannot understand
@JoeBlow The scar was "all around" him. The scar was also a bath of heat. He could have written "it was bathed in heat" but then he would give external agency (the sun) to the heat. The metal wreckage, the broken glass, would all radiate heat. The sentence is evocative and jarring because of its construction. It's not a straightforward syntax, nor should it be, in my opinion.
May
21
comment Expression from “Lord of the Flies” that I cannot understand
@Robusto Yes, I wasn't confident enough to mark it so. Agree with the decision. :)
May
20
comment Expression from “Lord of the Flies” that I cannot understand
I disagree that it's objectively badly-written. See english.stackexchange.com/questions/14709/…
May
20
comment Expression from “Lord of the Flies” that I cannot understand
VERY related: english.stackexchange.com/questions/14709/…
May
12
comment “Thank you very much” vs. “Thank you so much”
Data just doesn't support the idea that "thank you so much" is gaining in popularity compared to "thank you very much". I think you have developed a bias against the use of the intensifier "so", and therefore you are more likely to note and remember when you hear the phrase "thank you so much."
May
9
comment Is there a word to describe curiosity in a positive way?
My point, clumsily made as it was, is that you can be attentive to something without being curious about it at all. The words don't describe the same state of mind. I agree that curious and inquisitive are close synonyms. I disagree that "inquisitive" is in general, more negative. Having an "inquisitive mind" rarely has a negative connotation.