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seen Dec 24 at 15:22

Aug
12
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
23
answered English idiom equivalent to “Like a deaf man at a wedding procession”
Jul
23
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
18
comment Men who are lured by the seductive beauty of women are called?
I would argue that the question did not specify that the "fooling" needed to be an intentional act by the female so the final point is moot.
Jul
18
answered ostentatious vs pretentious
Jul
18
comment Men who are lured by the seductive beauty of women are called?
This is more of a philosophical answer than a literal one. No dictionary is going to include the definition "Human: one who is lured by the seductive beauty of the opposite sex".
Jul
18
answered Men who are lured by the seductive beauty of women are called?
Jul
16
comment Word to Warn of Danger of Usage
hazardous is the word often used in this context.
Jul
16
answered Why is 'spatial' written with a t instead of a c?
Jul
9
comment Legos not LEGO?
@Eno Bullocks. ;) I find that hard to believe. Probably the very first trademarked words to become generic, linoleum, was invented by an Englishman. The word sellotape is used instead of Scotch Tape (adhesive tape) in England, Ireland, Australia and many other countries. Hoover is still a trademark in the US, but is now generic in the UK…
Jul
7
comment What does “vanilla” mean in the context of gaming?
I find it ironic that what I find is one of the most interesting and enjoyable flavours has come to mean "bare minimum" or "no-frills" flavour.
Jun
18
comment What does “v.” stand for?
@ArashMousavi If you follow the hyperlink, you'll see that the case was Robert Eli Stanley against the State of Georgia.
Jun
18
comment What does “v.” stand for?
@vickyace Nope. See my answer. Initials are uppercase, a lowercase v. points towards a legal case.
Jun
18
answered What does “v.” stand for?
Jun
18
answered What is the correct term for “rubbing statues' parts for luck”?
Jun
18
comment What is the correct term for “rubbing statues' parts for luck”?
@AntonTykhyy You may find the term too general, but it's unlikely that you'll find a more specific term in English.
Jun
17
answered What word is this?
Jun
17
comment What does a series of dots (elipses) mean after a sentence?
@seabird The punctuation mark you are speaking about. The ellipsis
Jun
16
comment Why don't Americans have British accents?
@JimBeam Your premise is flawed. Americans do sound closer to Brits than not. Compare the difference between British English and American English, which started diverging 400 years ago, with this reading of Chaucer which is only 200 years older than that. Language changes faster than you realize.
Jun
11
comment “I and Jane” or “me and Jane”?
@bye You make a good point, and since I'm not generally a prescriptivist, I don't find the me and X compound subject as grating as, for example, I seen her at the store.