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Feb
11
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
10
comment English equivalent to the Indian saying “Like a thief being stung by a scorpion”
@JoeBlow I disagree. If I skipped school, didn't like injections, and my parents thought I was at risk because of a school trip, I would indeed be between a rock and a hard place. Do I confess and incur their wrath, or not confess and get an unpleasant injection?
Feb
10
answered Idiom criticizing a person who has unsolved problems but tries to give someone advice about them
Feb
10
comment Idiom criticizing a person who has unsolved problems but tries to give someone advice about them
While physician, heal thyself is a related idiom, it assumes that the person is capable of solving their own problems, but unwilling. I think the Iranian proverb casts aspersions on the person trying to solve problems for others — she/he is incapable of solving that problem for themselves.
Feb
6
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
22
comment “Digital computer” in the 1940s
Agree with @HotLicks. Digital is not synonymous with binary. Binary is a subset of digital. Babbage's Analytical Engine that he described in 1837 was a digital computer.
Jan
19
comment What do you call the facial expression or the state just before bursting into tears?
@Fard Within context, I think pout can certainly be sad enough. "The baby pouted then burst into tears"
Jan
5
comment “Love is for real” or “Love is real”
@Unknown It depends on context. I wouldn't consider "Love is for real" as being more romantic. It may even be less so, as "Love is real" is a more absolute and definitive statement.
Dec
22
comment How to spell and find razzu/razoo and its origin
I'm not sure that this question is appropriate for EL&U since it's not an English word, and may just be idiosyncratic to your mother. But to help, a little digging makes me think it must be related to the irish word rás which means race (ie. a sporting contest where the fastest wins.) Perhaps she was saying rás siúil which is a (walking) foot race.
Dec
10
answered Single word for “to start earlier”
Nov
19
answered Usage of “pragmatic” vs. “practical”
Nov
13
revised “France” pronunciation; /æ/ vs. /e/ in American accents
added 127 characters in body
Nov
13
revised “France” pronunciation; /æ/ vs. /e/ in American accents
added 318 characters in body
Nov
13
answered “France” pronunciation; /æ/ vs. /e/ in American accents
Nov
13
comment How to pronounce 'question'
Agree. I don't believe it's a common pronunciation in North American English either. Perhaps the person in question was Sean Connery?
Nov
13
revised Are there nouns that are always plural — have no plural counterpart?
added 81 characters in body
Nov
3
answered Is there English proverb equivalent to Japanese and Korean one, “The ground becomes solid after a heavy rain”?
Nov
3
comment Idiomatic expression meaning to not reveal emotions
I'm always fascinated to hear colloquialisms I don't recall ever seeing. I live in central Canada and this expression is completely foreign to me.
Oct
29
awarded  Yearling
Oct
15
awarded  Good Answer