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13h
revised History of '-itute' suffix?
added 8 characters in body
13h
comment History of '-itute' suffix?
@Mitch Most of them were taken straight from Latin during the English Renaissance.
1d
revised History of '-itute' suffix?
added 2 characters in body
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revised History of '-itute' suffix?
added 143 characters in body
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comment History of '-itute' suffix?
I agree. I suppose one could to correct the question, or point out misconceptions in the question in the answer. I chose the second path. :)
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revised History of '-itute' suffix?
added 301 characters in body
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comment History of '-itute' suffix?
I'm saying that statuere is a root, not a suffix. The words given originally came from latin words that modified the root word with prefixes, which have taken new meanings.
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revised History of '-itute' suffix?
added 645 characters in body
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answered History of '-itute' suffix?
Aug
12
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
24
comment Suffix comparing more than 2 items composed of only 2 degrees of importance?
@TusharRaj In common usage, the superlative is often used even if there are only two items to compare. People refer to the youngest child even if there are only two offspring.
Jun
24
comment Suffix comparing more than 2 items composed of only 2 degrees of importance?
Related: english.stackexchange.com/questions/159297/… (duplicate?)
Jun
24
comment Suffix comparing more than 2 items composed of only 2 degrees of importance?
@Andrew In my opinion, you are overthinking it. Both would be equally valid.
Jun
24
comment Why people pronounce “penetrative” with two stresses?
Hmm. Like bib, I should have said it was /ˌɪnkəˈrɛkt/
Jun
24
comment Why people pronounce “penetrative” with two stresses?
Your assumption (most English words are supposed to be pronounced with one stress only) is incorrect.
Jun
24
revised Verb tenses and types
added 6 characters in body
Jun
24
reviewed Approve Verb tenses and types
Jun
16
comment How did phobia ever come to mean hatred?
@Lars Oh, I understand the confusion now. That sentence was meant to clarify the sort of religious people not classified as homophobic. I don't agree with the implied premise of the statement in context: that people are classified as homophobic just because they are morally opposed to homosexuality.
Jun
16
comment Term for Subversive, Passive-Aggressive Insults (In which the insulter has plausible deniability, concerning any actual effort at offense)
You used the term backhanded compliment in describing your question. What's wrong with that?
Jun
16
comment How did phobia ever come to mean hatred?
Thank you for proving that a good answer doesn't need to drag politics or opinion into it.