Reputation
57,614
Next tag badge:
140/100 score
19/20 answers
Badges
7 106 189
Newest
 Good Answer
Impact
~2.1m people reached

2h
comment “You will love him to ruins.”
OK. A book. Please say which book; and possibly a little more context -- a couple of sentences before and after that one. Give the community as much information as you possibly can. As I said, this is not idiomatic. (It was ruins, was it, and not ruin?) AND, what have you already done to find the answer?
3h
comment “You will love him to ruins.”
Please also edit into the question the research you have already done. It would probably also help to say where you found your sentence, because it's not exactly idiomatic English.
3h
revised Isn't this an illogical comparison?
added 13 characters in body; edited tags
3h
comment Teaching tips for dyslexic learners
I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it relates to specialised teaching of English rather than the English language itself.
4h
awarded  Good Answer
23h
comment Word for a room with washing machines in it?
I'm afraid you also need to cite your image.
1d
comment Etymology of 'clinical' in 'clinical professor'?
What is a "clinical professor" in this question? In the UK, it would be a professor of clinical medicine at a university hospital.
1d
revised Where can I find a list of words that contain one or more spaces, such as ice cream?
Prior experience is irrelevant to this question
1d
revised The best word to describe intelligence,wisdom and vision
edited tags
1d
comment What is the name of a word like “shite”?
How is Zounds weird? It's pronounced zo̅o̅nds not zownds.
1d
comment What would I call the author and date line in a blog?
I would only use dateline for a date. I've never heard of anything but byline where the line includes the author (no matter what else is included).
1d
comment What would I call the author and date line in a blog?
Byline; line showing who it's by. Dateline: line showing date of writing. Many newspapers had both, especially when writing from far-flung places without telegraphy. News of Hillary conquering Everest took two or three days to reach London in 1953.
1d
answered What would I call the author and date line in a blog?
2d
comment English versus french grammar
Certainly, the fiancé/fiancée distinction does exist in British English. And I'm not entirely sure they are different words when they mean "affianced partner".
2d
comment How to use “glad” in a return email
I'm afraid we don't do ghost-writing, as Dan has said.
2d
revised How to use “glad” in a return email
edited body; edited tags
2d
comment English versus french grammar
However, some loanwords like fiancé/fiancée are differentiated in the way Morella asks about.
2d
awarded  Nice Answer
2d
comment article - the or a?
And specifically, kiamlaluno's answer at that question.
2d
comment How to politely ask someone to hurry up because of lack of time?
ELU doesn't really do this sort of etiquette thing as it's not the nuts and bolts of grammar. But I think it has appeared in the past on Workplace.