49,225 reputation
682158
bio website acleach.me.uk
location United Kingdom
age 49
visits member for 2 years, 8 months
seen 6 hours ago

I'm in the United Kingdom, and I'm interested in (or amazed at) the differences between "British" English and American English.


11h
comment Quote: nearly impossible for artists to critique themselves well?
The only relevant quote I can find in the recently-published script (PDF) is said by Mike [Edward Norton], quoting Flaubert: "A man becomes a critic when he can not be an artist, in the same way that a man becomes an informer when he cannot be a soldier."
13h
comment Word for a task which is flawed or doomed to failure but which you have to do anyway?
Helpful hint: Don't write answers as questions. Present what you think the answer is; support it with references.
13h
comment a term for a “not web” traditional application
Standalone apps? Desktop apps?
14h
comment Word for arson by secret police
I suspect the word most usually used would be murder, possibly qualified as "state-sponsored murder".
14h
revised What is the phonological error pronouncing /θ/ as /s/ called?
Better title; retag.
14h
revised Word that refers to objects found in kitchens
Provided explicit quote source as per policy. Incorrectly-cited posts may be removed.
1d
comment Single word for “Expanding and Contracting”
Fluctuates in size would surely do. And you might get away with something like throbs, although that may warrant a bit of explanation. "There is a theory that the universe throbs, expanding and contracting erratically over a period of billennia" or something.
1d
comment Is it clear what “it” is referring to in the following sentence?
Possibly because the question doesn't ask about the absence of that, but the use of it. Whereas your question majors on that and barely mentions it. It may be that someone gave up reading before the last sentence, thinking that it wasn't going to feature at all.
1d
comment What term means “all of the words one knows”?
No, that's so that the link appears exactly how you type it. Have a read of the Meta post.
1d
comment What term means “all of the words one knows”?
He has a somewhat limited [vocabulary](http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/vocabulary) with "[Merriam-Webster]" as plain text will do. Meta post
1d
comment Can “I be” ever be considered correct?
Perhaps; but the whoever indicates at least some doubt. The use of infinitive forms in this sort of sentence is archaic, if not obsolete. "Whoever I am" is now perfectly normal.
1d
comment Man-hour vs. person-hour? Is the former now considered politically incorrect?
@itsbruce I think this is a blanket answer, "Don't use gender-neutral phrases at all," and as such it covers the usage of "person hours" in the question. It is a bit of a rant, though.
1d
comment Can “one” be omitted if another one immediately follows?
Generally, when it's obvious what ones (or one) is referring to, it can and should be omitted. Here, the only relevant preceding noun is experiences, so it can readily be omitted.
1d
answered Can “I be” ever be considered correct?
1d
comment Can “I be” ever be considered correct?
Related: english.stackexchange.com/questions/93231/… | english.stackexchange.com/questions/121074/…
1d
revised Arbitrary or particular
Removed references to programming, which is off-topic.
1d
comment Which is the more appropriate word to use “stupidity” or “idiocy” in a medical context
Although "Don't label people" is a valid opinion to hold, that's not an option when translating an existing work which does that.
2d
reviewed Edit suggested edit on What is this type of “double-entry” phrase called?
2d
revised What is this type of “double-entry” phrase called?
Not the "&" symbol... What are the word combinations called? (Blank AND Blank) they are often used...
2d
revised What is this type of “double-entry” phrase called?
added 99 characters in body; edited tags