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... English examples of usage, which are at the extremes that folks, even native speakers, can comprehend, this comprehension being the goal of communication, and this communication being central to my goals in writing, which can be clarified by studying ... (continued at top)


Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Aug
27
comment Where did the term “OK/Okay” come from?
@PeterShor: You misunderstood--- I agree that the initialism is an 1830s construction (or if you like "fabrication"), the word does appear as ok or OK all the time, but this should not be considered a fabrication in 1830s, because the origin of the word in Choctaw was common knowledge at the time, the word is associated with frontier people in Choctaw territory and has Native connotations. The Choctaw etymology remained more esoteric common knowledge until Woodrow Wilson's time, and continued to be common knowledge until Read purposefully substituted a cock-and-bull fake etymology for it.
May
2
comment Where did the term “OK/Okay” come from?
@nomen: The linked article provides obvious pre-1839 usage, including one from Read's own stuff (he claims a fur trader used the expression on invoices, when the fellow retired from trading in 1834). The dictionary references pre-date this, and the evidence of widespread familiarity is that they didn't even feel the need to include a description of the word "okeh", it was commonly known for those learning Choctaw. I will REASSERT and REASSERT again, because anyone who disagrees with the conclusion that okay is Choctaw is a blithering idiot. This is an ad-hominem, but it is not fallacious.
May
1
comment Where did the term “OK/Okay” come from?
@JanusBahsJacquet: I should add that ok can be used as an adjective, rarely, like "give me the ok one", but "okbaby" is not an example of use as an adjective. The "okbaby" usage is an example of the Choctaw usage of getting attention to what follows, like "Ok! Lets' get started." The "lolspeak" and "lolcat" are neologisms using lol as a part, they don't produce new functions for lol in sentences. You can't say "The very lol picture I saw had a tree in it", lol simply is never an adjective. You are not properly looking at function, neither for ok, nor lol. Please read the linked article.
May
1
comment Where did the term “OK/Okay” come from?
@JanusBahsJacquet: "lolspeak" and "lolcat" are related, but entirely unimportant. Lol is not being used as an adjective, "okbaby" doesn't make ok an adjective. My condescention is justified, and if you just read the linked material you will see why. I am placing the only legitimate scholarly conclusion possible on a page full of dimwitted know-nothings repeating authoritative fabrications, and I am supposed to be respectful of this drivel? Sorry, fat chance. You need to accept that any alternative non-Choctaw origin story is the product of the conjunction of a damaged brain and authority.
May
1
comment Where did the term “OK/Okay” come from?
@JanusBahsJacquet: Also, if you read the linked article (I dug it up for this purpose) you wouldn't be criticizing me speciously, you would be downvoting everyone else, and getting upset that a single powerful idiot like Read can lead to a situation such as we find on this page.
May
1
comment Where did the term “OK/Okay” come from?
@JanusBahsJacquet: It is not utterly ludicrous, there are two usages, which I described. "I LOLed" and "Lol". That's it, both are obvious from the acronym, and that's it for Lol. Ok has no such barriers, and never did, it modified sentences, and it designated affirmation even in the 19th century when it was introduced, in the same crazy distinctive way that the Choctaw particle does. A lolcat is a noun, it is always a noun, meaning a cat speaking ungrammatical English, and is grammatically unrelated to any other usage of lol. It's just as irrelevant to "lol" function as "okbaby" is for ok.
May
1
comment Where did the term “OK/Okay” come from?
@JanusBahsJacquet: No, no. Lol is used wherever "laugh out loud" can be reinserted. This makes it a verb. It is used as a verb or as a noun, equivalent to "lol". It is never used as okay is used, especially in the strange usage described in the linked article "Did you arrive? Oh, we arrived ok, but we were late, and I had a broken arm." This sense is more revealing from any other, and obviously, obviously, Choctaw. The whole point is that the initial seed is for a particle used to indicate affirmation. Lol is used like this "I LOLed. Lol", in ways consistent with its origin, and always will.
May
1
comment Where did the term “OK/Okay” come from?
@nomen: Whether they have or haven't, that's not where it comes from. It comes from Choctaw, as anyone reasonably conversant with the history should conclude. There is no other remotely plausible idea, it is obviously Choctaw, and all other attempts to explain this are purposeful deception or self-delusion, weak-brained fantasy.
May
1
comment Where did the term “OK/Okay” come from?
@JanusBahsJacquet: I am condescendingly dismissing mentally defective theories of Read that deserve to be condescendingly dismissed. There is no comparable instance of an invented acronym turning into a particle of this kind, with this type of usage. Acronyms are used in a specific way, related to the origin of the acronym, not in the general way that "ok" is used ("I am ok. Ok? Okay, now that I've cleared that up okay, I'll okay that with other members."). As explained in the linked article, this crazy usage is completely consistent with Choctaw and not with any cock-and-bull story of Read's.
Apr
30
comment Where did the term “OK/Okay” come from?
I found the page on wayback, you can read the attached article now.
Apr
30
revised Where did the term “OK/Okay” come from?
fix link
Apr
30
comment Where did the term “OK/Okay” come from?
A minute googling produced this link: datasync.com/~rsf1/ok.htm . I am really, really annoyed that the original link is dead now, I'll try to find it on wayback.
Apr
30
comment Where did the term “OK/Okay” come from?
For a quote of a dictionary saying it is Choctaw as late as 1961, see Wikipedia: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Okay#Choctaw . This is really the correct etymology, there can be no dispute, it was a ridiculous, bald-faced, absurd (and completely unimportant) lie by Read, it was his own pet discovery in etymology, and nobody wanted to contradict him because he ran a top journal. I can't believe people actually believe his bullshit, otherwise I would argue against it more persuasively. When something is this stupid, you can't argue against it persuasively.
Apr
30
comment Where did the term “OK/Okay” come from?
@nomen: No, the article I linked to was several pages, and made the argument completely persuasively, but it has now disappeared, and my link is a dead link. The origin of the word can't be controversial, the word "okay" in Choctaw means "okay", and it was used throughout the 19th century, and the documentation is superabundant. It's just being flushed down the memory hole. I don't need to do scholarship, frankly, because it's obvious. The stuff you read today is a fabrication due to Allen Walker Read, and he was a major journal editor, with a vendetta against Choctaw I suppose.
Apr
30
comment Where did the term “OK/Okay” come from?
Yes, this is the consensus opinion, and the consensus opinion is moronically wrong. It was established by one idiot named Read who happened to edit a major journal on etymology, which goes to show you how much damage one mentally challenged academic in a position of power can do.
Apr
30
comment Where did the term “OK/Okay” come from?
@nomen: I don't cite anything, I never have, it's a pointless appeal to authority. Go verify it yourself. it's not hard. To help you, Woodrow Wilson cited one of them once in the 1920s.
Mar
2
awarded  Yearling
Feb
3
comment Where did the term “OK/Okay” come from?
@Oldcat: Yes, except that's not where it comes from. It obviously, without any possible doubt, comes from Choctaw. It's as if you made up an acronym to explain people saying "muchos gracias", ok is as obviously Choctaw as "gracias" is obviously Spanish. The joke came from playing on the similarity to the letters "O" and "K".
Aug
14
awarded  Popular Question