628 reputation
28
bio website
location New York City
age 40
visits member for 2 years, 1 month
seen 13 hours ago

... English examples of usage, which are at the extremes that folks, even native speakers, can comprehend, this comprehension being the goal of communication, and this communication being central to my goals in writing, which can be clarified by studying ... (continued at top)


Mar
2
awarded  Yearling
Feb
3
comment Where did the term “OK/Okay” come from?
@Oldcat: Yes, except that's not where it comes from. It obviously, without any possible doubt, comes from Choctaw. It's as if you made up an acronym to explain people saying "muchos gracias", ok is as obviously Choctaw as "gracias" is obviously Spanish. The joke came from playing on the similarity to the letters "O" and "K".
Aug
14
awarded  Popular Question
Mar
2
awarded  Yearling
Sep
18
comment When do I use “I” instead of “me?”
@Malvolio: I don't have a problem with "Jane and I", as antecedent, this is not the point. Just say "Jane, me, Arthur, and his middle school classroom walked to Sweden." The question is what to do in lists.
Sep
12
comment When do I use “I” instead of “me?”
@Malvolio: That's not true--- "Jane, me and all those people working beside us, contributed greatly to this movie." vs. "Jane, I and all those people working beside us, contributed greatly to this movie." My rule is correct, it is internalized by all English speakers, it just does not appear in any books. It's not my fault the books are incompetent, this isn't rocket science.
Aug
14
awarded  Critic
Aug
14
comment Where did the term “OK/Okay” come from?
-1: Read my answer, and the linked article to see why this is a terrible answer. This Read guy invented the stupidest cock-and-bull story for this word, and it became established and taught in schools. One must not tell lies.
Aug
10
comment “Don't let's fight”
@MaximV.Pavlov: not really, I am just saying that "Mom" is not doing any "letting" in the second part of the sentence. The "Mom" is clearly being let go to the movies, she is just not doing the letting. That's some abstract nonmentioned subject. Whether you are talking to yourself or not is not important, it could be either, but most likely you want Mom to go with you to the movies.
May
11
comment When do I use “I” instead of “me?”
@JohnY: I made it up! Like everything else I write. I try to never use references, (unless I accidentally hit on somebody else's idea, I wouldn't want to steal credit), as I only believe in original thought.
May
8
comment When do I use “I” instead of “me?”
@JohnY: Yup. It's a problem. But one could still program a computer to read one version of the language, like NYT English circa 2010.
Apr
26
revised Why do you say “so do I”?
fixes
Apr
26
comment Why do you say “so do I”?
@ColinFine: I agree with you, sorry for misspelling, but these are marginal cases. The "keep" occurs in this construction in many 16th century contexts, and should be considered archaic. "Ought to" is not auxiliary, but "thus ought you dance" is marginally acceptable to my ears, so I included it. I will edit to adress your concerns.
Apr
23
comment Auxiliary movement in AAVE
Thanks for the prompt answer!
Apr
23
accepted Auxiliary movement in AAVE
Apr
22
revised Why do you say “so do I”?
remove Chinese english (nonnative or machine translated) example
Apr
22
asked Auxiliary movement in AAVE
Apr
22
comment Why do you say “so do I”?
The use of "when" is a wh-movement, you can't extrapolate. "So do I" is the same as "When pigs fly, then do I go to work." There is an ellipsis in the "So do I.", so it's "When do you go to work?" "When pigs fly, then do I." is correct (although strangely elegant sounding).
Apr
22
comment Why do you say “so do I”?
It's because they are auxiliary verbs. But you have accepted and upvoted a wrong answer.
Apr
22
comment Why do you say “so do I”?
This is definitely wrong.