9,180 reputation
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location Bali, Indonesia
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visits member for 2 years, 9 months
seen 2 hours ago

I don't fill in brag boxes.


11h
comment How would you transcribe the pronunciation of “ttiwdty”?
It sounds to me like tut-you-ditty. I can't be bothered going through the process of transcribing that into IPA...
15h
reviewed Reject suggested edit on “Firehouse” vs. “fire station”
20h
reviewed Reject and Edit suggested edit on is 'the' an adjective? Please tell
20h
revised is 'the' an adjective? Please tell
added italics
20h
comment Where is the truth?
It is a question about religious icons.
1d
comment past perfect tense and comma usage in Churchill's book
@Mari-LouA ~ this rather depends on what you mean by 'precede'. If you mean working in the saloon started before the exciting part was reached, then yes- it almost certainly did but we don't know or care how long before. What we are interested in is that it was still continuing when it got exciting. If you mean that working in the saloon started and finished before the exciting bit was reached, we know that is not the case because it simply wouldn't make sense. It would mean that he wasn't working in the saloon when the exciting part of the working was reached, and that cannot be true.
1d
answered past perfect tense and comma usage in Churchill's book
2d
comment Spill the metaphorical beans?
You're welcome. :)
2d
comment Putative should - what time does it express?
Putative should is real enough, and has been discussed by Neels and in more depth by Quirk. The 'wishy-washy term' notion stems from the mistaken belief that the putative should is just a subjunctive by another name, but Quirk showed that the real-life usage is distinct, specifically that the subjunctive is used "especially when immediate action seems desirable" and the putative should is used to convey "the notion of a 'putative' situation, which is recognized as possibly existing or coming into existence"
2d
comment Putative should - what time does it express?
@user1425 ~ your OP says "What is the factor which indicates the time reference expressed by the putative should" and "I want to see whether SHOULD follows them in the time respect or it doesn't" and I have already told you it doesn't. Ever. Should is there to express emotion. You don't accept that and are now saying it is not about should, so it can only be a basic question of recognising past, present, or future that should be in ELL but you deny that too, so to be quite blunt it is hard to see what you are asking about at all.
2d
comment Are there any famous English poems that every British-raised or American-raised person knows?
@PeterShor ~ I am not disputing the quality of Shakespeare's soliloquys, but they are very distinct from poems. The relevant distinction is that a poem is a self-contained structure while a soliloquy needs the context of the play in which it appears. I am familiar with the structuralist arguments that poems rely on pre-existing knowledge which blurs the notion of 'the beginning', but the text itself is still self-contained.
2d
comment Putative should - what time does it express?
@user1425 ~ if you are now saying that this is nothing to do with using putative should, and that is there just for show, your question is reduced to 'how do I tell whether a sentence is past, present, or future?' and should be in ELL.
2d
comment Gone are the days
Could you be more specific?
2d
comment Spill the metaphorical beans?
There is no difference.'Spill the beans' is a well-known metaphor, so adding 'metaphorical' is just for style because the host thinks it sounds better. It is somewhat redundant, unless Reed is sat with a container of beans in his lap.
2d
comment Putative should - what time does it express?
The simple answer is that the question is wrong - the putative should doesn't express time. It expresses emotion and it's use is often triggered by the use of suasive verbs, nouns, or adjectives.
2d
comment Are there any famous English poems that every British-raised or American-raised person knows?
Maybe Auden's Funeral Blues, thanks to Four Weddings and a Funeral, or Lear's delightful nonsense poem The Owl and the Pussycat, or on a more serious note Blake's The Tyger. Tennyson's The Charge of the Light Brigade perhaps... its existence is well known but I am not sure how many people have ever read it! Soliloquys from Shakespeare's plays are not really poems... do they still count?
2d
comment have lived vs have been living
This question appears to be off-topic because it is not a question about language.
2d
comment have lived vs have been living
What is the point of this question? The truth depends on how long you have been living in the town. If it is 12 years the sentences are true, if it not 12 years they are false, meaning that the truth is not a linguistic issue and cannot be answered here.
Nov
22
comment What's the use of Grammar?
It is not even a linguistics question. It is a philosophical question at best and a peeve at worst.
Nov
22
reviewed Approve suggested edit on A code or some code?