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location Jakarta, Indonesia
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visits member for 2 years, 6 months
seen 19 hours ago

I don't fill in brag boxes.


Aug
25
reviewed Approve suggested edit on A word for converting numbers to (number / 1000) + K
Aug
25
answered “Being myself of the feminine gender…” Gender ? Or sex?
Aug
24
comment Eww! Has it crossed the pond yet?
Mari-Lou... as well as being a bit condescending there - what makes you assume I don't know anything about corpora? - I did say it was from Ngram so it is not me asserting anything. It is me investigating in the quickest and easiest way whether your assumption that 'eww' began in the states is actually true and reporting what Ngram said. Plus, whatever the shortcomings of Ngram, the assumption that it is always wrong is logically indefensible.
Aug
23
comment Eww! Has it crossed the pond yet?
Janus... as far as I can see, it is used in Indonesian, and Chinese, and Malay, though there is something of the Observers Dilemma here, as in I don't know how common it is in Indonesia when there isn't this white guy listening!
Aug
23
comment Eww! Has it crossed the pond yet?
Depending how many w's you use in spelling, a quick fiddle with Ngram has it being around since the 1900's, with a preference for 'eww' in BE and 'ewww' in AE. As for crossing the pond... I live and work in SEA and it is commonplace here, so it has done more than just cross the Atlantic - assuming it isn't a universal sound that has no particular origin.
Aug
23
reviewed Approve suggested edit on What do we call the “rd” in “3ʳᵈ” and the “th” in “9ᵗʰ”?
Aug
22
comment Pronounce abreviation/acronym as word or based
Not sure I would call it arbitrary - ease of articulation has a lot to do with it - but I agree that the pronunciation is not rule driven. It is more of a convention. I was thinking of Nato, were the -ay- does not reflect the initial [a] of Atlantic. Incidentally, I have never heard of FAQ being anything but ef-ay-cue, probably because 'fak' is too close to an obscenity in my country. I am quite curious about where Wiki gets that one from.
Aug
18
comment “He walks as if he is drunk.” Grammatically correct ? Any difference in meaning from “…as if he were drunk.”?
The walking drunk is right now, while the rain is a prediction. The prediction is based on current evidence of clouds or whatever, which is the "it looks as if" part, and the evidence of clouds is real. In short "it looks as if it is going to" is real and current, not hypothetical or an opinion or a belief, but "as if he were drunk" is.
Aug
18
comment “He walks as if he is drunk.” Grammatically correct ? Any difference in meaning from “…as if he were drunk.”?
I agree that using 'is' could be natural, in the same way that "if I was rich..." is natural, but only because the subjubctive generally is being used less and less. However, if you don't know whether the individual in the example is drunk or not, then it is still irrealis. It is hypothetical, or an opinion, or a belief. The role of the subjunctive is to mark it as such so in pure grammatical terms it should be "he walks as if he were drunk". Whether that is common usage or not is a different issue...
Aug
17
answered “He walks as if he is drunk.” Grammatically correct ? Any difference in meaning from “…as if he were drunk.”?
Aug
17
reviewed Approve suggested edit on It is (was) … that … in plural forms for emphasis
Aug
17
comment The best time to go out for (a) dinner
Dinner is normally used as an uncountable noun, and therefore doesn't take an article. On some occasions, such as when want to refer to one single instance of having dinner, it can be treated as countable and given an article.
Aug
17
reviewed Approve suggested edit on The best time to go out for (a) dinner
Aug
13
comment Do I need to put a comma before every “because”?
Commas around a non-defining relative clause is quite a hard and fast rule.
Aug
13
answered Do I need to put a comma before every “because”?
Jun
8
reviewed Reject suggested edit on Is there a reason to use “mono” over “uni”?
Jun
8
reviewed Reject suggested edit on What does the word “s***storm” mean exactly?
May
28
reviewed Approve suggested edit on What's the difference between “puberty” and “adolescence”?
May
28
comment Is the opposite of 'within', 'without'?
You really think so? ~ ~ "archaic or literary - Outside: 'the barbarians without the gates' -> oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/without
May
28
comment Is the opposite of 'within', 'without'?
"Wamba had improved their town and made it a fair and comfortable place to dwell in, and the barbarians without the gates were quieted now by frequent defeat." ~ ~ Does this sentence mean the barbarians outside the gates, or the barbarians who didn't own a single gate between them?