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Apr
23
comment How can something be “set in stone”?
@hotlicks ~ the dictionary shoes that there is more to 'set' than simply the sense of harden like concrete or mortar as the OP appears to believe, and includes the sense of placing as in setting a stone in a ring or making an arrangement.
Apr
23
comment How can something be “set in stone”?
Have you tried looking in a dictionary? > oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/set
Apr
18
comment A murder of crows?
There are guides, but no standards. New ones arise in the usual way - somebody coins one and it catches on. I have heard, for example, " a clusterfuck of managers" a few times in the past couple of years. I can see that one becoming popular.
Apr
18
comment Is “apt alliteration's artful aid” actually alliterative?
Old English and Modern English are functionally two different languages, so comparisons like that should be taken with a (large) pinch of salt. Plus, OE alliteration is based on the same sound in the stressed syllable, not the same sound at the beginning of the word. OE metrical form was basically lines of two feet, pause, two feet with the stressed syllable of each half line having the same sound.
Apr
17
comment Is “apt alliteration's artful aid” actually alliterative?
To add to the fun, at least one dictionary (examples.yourdictionary.com/alliteration-examples.html) tells us that alliteration is "when a series of words in a row (or close to a row) have the same first consonant sound" and then gives example for every letter of the alphabet - including the vowels! To be fair, Literary Devices (literarydevices.net/alliteration) does the same thing: "having the same first consonant sound" followed by American Airlines and American Apparrel as examples.
Apr
17
comment Is “apt alliteration's artful aid” actually alliterative?
The other problem with looking in a dictionary is that more specialised sources often contradict dictionary entries: "The repetition of initial stressed, consonant sounds"(poetryfoundation.org/learning/glossary-term/alliteration) or "he repetition of consonant sounds at the beginning of words"(britannica.com/art/alliteration) are quite specific about it being consonants and not vowels.m
Apr
17
comment Is “apt alliteration's artful aid” actually alliterative?
Curious. How does "similar sounds at the beginning of words or in stressed syllables", or "commencement of certain accented syllables of a verse with the same consonant or consonantal group, or with any vowel sounds", or "the use of the same consonant...or of a vowel...at the beginning of each word or each stressed syllable" differ from assonance or consonance? This looks to me like dictionaries taking the stance that assonance and consonance are types of alliteration, so they can be lumped together.
Apr
17
comment Is “apt alliteration's artful aid” actually alliterative?
Alan's angry architect?
Apr
17
comment Is “apt alliteration's artful aid” actually alliterative?
Hmmmm... I guess it would so it is not a good example, - my bad! - but it is not assonic because everything starts with an 'a'. "Alan's artful department" would work as assonance too.
Apr
17
comment Is “apt alliteration's artful aid” actually alliterative?
That is where I am too. Based on what I learned in school, alliteration was repeated first sounds, assonance was repeated internal vowels, and consonance was repeated internal consonants. I never questioned that because is is tidy, until a few hours ago.
Apr
17
comment Is “apt alliteration's artful aid” actually alliterative?
The links I provided in the OP say alliteration applies to strings of word that start with the same consonant - that is why I am asking the question!
Apr
17
comment Is “apt alliteration's artful aid” actually alliterative?
Yep... I totally agree that it is not consonance! But if it is none of the above, what do we call it?
Apr
17
comment Is “apt alliteration's artful aid” actually alliterative?
'r' is a consonant...
Apr
17
revised Is “apt alliteration's artful aid” actually alliterative?
edited title
Apr
17
comment Is “apt alliteration's artful aid” actually alliterative?
@deadrat assonance or alliteration? If it is assonance, that would leave something like "Alan's artful apartment" as neither alliteration nor assonance.
Apr
17
comment Is “apt alliteration's artful aid” actually alliterative?
This doesn't really answer my question. I know that most ( but not all...) sources say assonance is internal, and the others say it is when the stressed syllable has the same vowel sound, so in either case it is not a repeated initial vowel sound. As it isn't assonance, and it isn't alliteration, what is it?
Apr
17
awarded  Student
Apr
17
asked Is “apt alliteration's artful aid” actually alliterative?
Apr
8
comment Does the word 'Dropout' have negative connatations?
@Drew ~ You are correct. Trying to spin it or cover up looks too obvious, and that is precisely why I suggest being honest instead of covering up. The OP (hopfully!) had a good reason to drop out/withdraw from the course, and he should explain that. No blah blah blah. No cover up.
Apr
8
comment Does the word 'Dropout' have negative connatations?
Dropped out = failed to get the degree so yes - it has negative connotations. On your resume, it is probably best to be honest and tell them why you withdrew. If the reason is good, it becomes a positive. My resume includes leaving an employer after only 2 months. I put it down to "moral reasons" and every potential employers asks about this, so I explain that I felt this employer was dishonest and decieving clients. This turns what was actually a blazing row the CEO, followed by "fuck you!" and storming out, into a positive thing as I come out looking noble and caring.