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seen Apr 1 at 12:44

I don't fill in brag boxes.


Mar
1
awarded  Yearling
Feb
3
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
27
reviewed Close Can I say “Why not you study literature?”
Dec
27
awarded  Custodian
Dec
27
reviewed Close “That was me” vs. “That was I”
Dec
27
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Is there a word for “air can pass through it”?
Dec
22
awarded  Pundit
Dec
21
awarded  Enlightened
Dec
21
awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
3
comment In a theatrical reenactment of a real event, how can the 4th wall be broken?
By the way... I am not saying that to be a prat - it is in the good answer guidelines here -> english.stackexchange.com/help/how-to-answer
Nov
3
comment In a theatrical reenactment of a real event, how can the 4th wall be broken?
As I see it, the question is "can I say that the fourth wall is being broken by the realness of the experience?" which would be a question about the usage of the term 'fourth wall'. I am not 100% sure though, depending on what 'can I say' means, so I have asked the OP for clarification. If it is a question about what constitutes a breaking of the fourth wall, then yes- it is off-topic. In either case though, suggesting a fancy word is not really an answer.
Nov
3
comment In a theatrical reenactment of a real event, how can the 4th wall be broken?
A whole new level of audience participation...
Nov
3
comment What does 'sanding a doorstep' mean?
I am not sure they have a Farsi edition.
Nov
3
comment What is a single word for “wandering around a mall or a market”?
Window shopping?
Nov
3
comment In a theatrical reenactment of a real event, how can the 4th wall be broken?
Could you give a bit more detail of why you think the realness of the experience would break the fourth wall?
Nov
3
comment In a theatrical reenactment of a real event, how can the 4th wall be broken?
... and the fourth wall? Verisimilitude is a nice word and all that, but it doesn't address whether the fourth wall is being broken.
Nov
3
answered What does 'sanding a doorstep' mean?
Nov
3
comment “There is a car on/in the street”
I wasn't suggesting it were simple, or even that gelolopez is wrong, more that the surface/enclosed reasoning doesn't work. I am not going to answer this one because (as noted by WS2) to us Brits it is "in the street" and while I would love to say that is the answer, Ngram (English corpus) says both are used pretty much equally, but with 'on' trending up and 'in' trending down. The British English corpus prefers 'in'.
Nov
3
comment “There is a car on/in the street”
A street has buildings, which defines it as a street and form an enclosed space.
Oct
21
comment Do prepositions at the end of sentences, and split infinitives any longer matter?
I can only conclude that you don't read much formal writing.