118 reputation
16
bio website
location
age
visits member for 2 years, 9 months
seen 16 hours ago

2d
awarded  Commentator
2d
comment What is the American word for 'tea-towel'?
I believe Lynn's answer is the more appropriate one. The OP is asking for the towel you commonly hang at the door of your oven and likely don't use for anything but kitchen decoration. Dish-towel may be a very similar thing, but there's a clear distinction in my house between the wedding/Christmas/Thanksgiving tea-towels (or kitchen-towels) that go on the oven handle, and the towels we use to clean things up.
2d
comment What is the American word for 'tea-towel'?
"Bath and Body Works" stocks them as "Kitchen Towels", and while you can get any Holiday theme, you can also get Paris themed, New York, etc.
Oct
28
awarded  Supporter
Oct
28
comment Where does the word (magic) cookie come from?
Why was this closed? The "General Reference" link does not explain origin of the term "magic cookie". Since the sources being referenced for information don't claim to have the answer this should be left open. Perhaps an expert has an answer to this. The has an origin within "remembered" history, so I doubt it's strictly unknowable.
Oct
21
comment What do you call those two strands coming out of the electric capacitors?
The long one is called the "anode", and the short one is called the "cathode". Both of them are "electrodes". But in a far more general sense: "leads".
Nov
26
awarded  Notable Question
Mar
5
awarded  Popular Question
Jan
27
awarded  Talkative
Mar
1
comment Answering: “What do you say?”
@DavidWallace That one sounds great! Unfortunately the first time I was asked that question was while meeting someone for the first time.
Feb
29
awarded  Scholar
Feb
29
accepted Answering: “What do you say?”
Feb
29
comment Answering: “What do you say?”
Ah ha, this is what I was looking for. "Not much" I think "note much" will be my go-to response to that question. I knew that I needed a non-committal response, but I wasn't sure what form it should take, but this answers that question. Thank you.
Feb
29
comment Answering: “What do you say?”
At least with every other non-committal greeting I'm familiar with, they can at least be interpreted as a actual question, then given a generalized answer. For example, I can actually answer "how I'm doing", as generally or honestly as I want. "What do you say?" there doesn't seem to be a real-alternative for an answer. I somehow can't see answering "what do you say?" with "fine", then again... having just said "fine" does verify that I say "fine", technically.
Feb
29
awarded  Student
Feb
29
asked Answering: “What do you say?”