232 reputation
311
bio website stackoverflow.com/users/…
location Japan
age 33
visits member for 2 years, 9 months
seen Nov 23 at 22:07

Focusing on the .NET framework.


May
10
comment Hatred of Chinese
Sinophobia and anti-Chinese sentiment are equivalent in meaning I belive.
May
13
comment “requested to” vs “requested from”
@Kris: Thanks for the input. I thought that both could be used, but according to the comments and answers, requested to is ungrammatical.
May
13
comment “requested to” vs “requested from”
@BraddSzonye: Thanks Bradd, I understand the problem now.
May
13
comment “requested to” vs “requested from”
Thanks, useful information. Perhaps information was a bad example, how about the hits for tests requested to the?
May
13
comment “requested to” vs “requested from”
@BillFranke: Is this fundamental? I get a lot of hits for requested to.
May
13
comment “requested to” vs “requested from”
@BillFranke: Does that mean "requested to" is incorrect or ungrammatical?
Apr
25
comment Is “sans” a drop-in replacement for “without”?
@Chris: People usually do not consciously engage in language extermination. It generally stems from a natural process of language evolution. The usage of sans has simply died out (although I've seen it used by non-native English speakers).
Jan
25
comment What's the English equivalent of the Japanese saying, “A fart ruins 100 days of sermons by the priest (bishop)”?
These sayings are usually found in any English-kotowaza(proverb) dictionary. See here: A good name is sooner lost than won. or An hour has destroyed what an age has built. (although they lose the humorous aspect).
Oct
9
comment Origin of word “xfered”
Excellent, this was what I was looking for. It makes a lot more sense explaining why it is an abbreviation.
Oct
9
comment Origin of word “xfered”
@coleopterist: Thanks, that seems to answer my question. Although, I wonder which is more common, one "r" or two (i.e., xferred or xfered).
May
22
comment “Suited to” vs. “suited for”
Hmm.. reading the links Cameron posted makes me feel that they are not interchangeable, i.e., "Japan is suited to agriculture" would be wrong.
Mar
8
comment What is the correct way to possessivize (if that's a word) a compound noun?
@tchrist: Yes, there are many odd things about possessives. Here is another one New York’s and Chicago’s transportation systems. <-- In this example having two `s is correct because "transportation systems" are two different entities. Unless you already have, buy a copy of "The Chicago Manual of Style" for more reference.
Mar
8
comment What is the correct way to possessivize (if that's a word) a compound noun?
@tchrist: I'm a native English speaker and have never seen that usage (I also Googled it and didn't get any hits). However, English is a big language so I could be wrong! Also, native speakers make mistakes all the time when speaking, so that might be the case.
Mar
8
comment What is the correct way to possessivize (if that's a word) a compound noun?
@tchrist: Sorry, I didn't understand your explanation. The sentence "The person in the car's phone rang." is not English.
Feb
24
comment What's the difference between micro-particle and micron-particle?
I agree with your assessment and will use microparticle, thank you.
Feb
24
comment What's the difference between micro-particle and micron-particle?
@downvoter: An explanation of why would be polite for newcomers.