225 reputation
311
bio website stackoverflow.com/users/…
location Japan
age 33
visits member for 2 years, 7 months
seen Aug 27 at 7:46

Focusing on the .NET framework.


Oct
9
comment Origin of word “xfered”
@coleopterist: Thanks, that seems to answer my question. Although, I wonder which is more common, one "r" or two (i.e., xferred or xfered).
Oct
9
asked Origin of word “xfered”
Jul
4
awarded  Autobiographer
May
22
comment “Suited to” vs. “suited for”
Hmm.. reading the links Cameron posted makes me feel that they are not interchangeable, i.e., "Japan is suited to agriculture" would be wrong.
May
22
asked “Suited to” vs. “suited for”
Mar
9
accepted When can I omit “for” before a time duration?
Mar
9
awarded  Student
Mar
9
asked When can I omit “for” before a time duration?
Mar
8
comment What is the correct way to possessivize (if that's a word) a compound noun?
@tchrist: Yes, there are many odd things about possessives. Here is another one New York’s and Chicago’s transportation systems. <-- In this example having two `s is correct because "transportation systems" are two different entities. Unless you already have, buy a copy of "The Chicago Manual of Style" for more reference.
Mar
8
comment What is the correct way to possessivize (if that's a word) a compound noun?
@tchrist: I'm a native English speaker and have never seen that usage (I also Googled it and didn't get any hits). However, English is a big language so I could be wrong! Also, native speakers make mistakes all the time when speaking, so that might be the case.
Mar
8
comment What is the correct way to possessivize (if that's a word) a compound noun?
@tchrist: Sorry, I didn't understand your explanation. The sentence "The person in the car's phone rang." is not English.
Mar
8
answered Is there any term in English for a person who starts a debate, but once he is presented some valid arguments or facts, he quickly retreats?
Mar
8
answered What is the correct way to possessivize (if that's a word) a compound noun?
Feb
24
awarded  Teacher
Feb
24
answered Starting a sentence with 'About your question, …'
Feb
24
awarded  Supporter
Feb
24
awarded  Scholar
Feb
24
comment What's the difference between micro-particle and micron-particle?
I agree with your assessment and will use microparticle, thank you.
Feb
24
accepted What's the difference between micro-particle and micron-particle?
Feb
24
awarded  Editor