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10h
awarded  Enlightened
Apr
16
awarded  Nice Question
Mar
16
comment What is the origin of “cross country skiing”?
@JoeBlow You misinterpret my answer. Read the next paragraph.
Jan
24
awarded  Good Answer
Jan
16
awarded  Enlightened
Jan
16
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
16
revised Pronunciation of “Paraguay”
edited body
Dec
8
comment Difference between “warrior” and “soldier”
@ab2: That's only in specific military jargon of certain countries. I think the generic English meanings still agree with what I've written above.
Dec
4
comment Which is correct: “Filename”, “File Name” or “FileName”?
@jnm2: Nope, the OP didn't tag it as such, another user did that shortly after (indeed after my answer). Anyway, I think the answer is already complete enough.
Dec
1
awarded  Guru
Nov
1
comment Why the does 'tu' get pronounced 'tyu' in British English?
That's a fair point. I'm still sceptical they're different sounds (rather than different degrees), but perhaps I could find an audio example somewhere online...
Nov
1
comment Why the does 'tu' get pronounced 'tyu' in British English?
@PeterShor: Thanks for the link to the blog post. I certainly accept there is difference in degree between the two sounds, but it's fundamentally the same sound as far as I can tell. Very odd that they have two different IPA letters.
Nov
1
comment Why the does 'tu' get pronounced 'tyu' in British English?
@PeterShor: Not true! I speak Spanish, and it most certainly exists there. It exists in Italian too, I'm sure.
Nov
1
comment Why the does 'tu' get pronounced 'tyu' in British English?
Interesting. So you pronounce "new" as "nyew"? That is getting rather rarer these days.
Nov
1
comment Why the does 'tu' get pronounced 'tyu' in British English?
@PeterShor, Yeah. I find it odd that it doesn't exist though, since the "tu" sound exists in every other European language I'm aware of, and the "tyu" sound doesn't exist in them. That's interesting some dialects of English have started using the /y/ sound though – which dialects, may I ask? (I'm still struggling to note the difference between /y/ and long /u/, mind you.)
Nov
1
comment Why the does 'tu' get pronounced 'tyu' in British English?
@PeterShor: Yeah, I'm aware of that. I'm still convinced the American pronunciation in this case is more antiquated and traditional though.
Oct
6
comment Verb describing using a Taser on someone?
@vartec: No rules that are "set in stone", I'd say. As in most other languages, neologisms are most often modelled on existing words that are phonologically or etymologically similar. Failing that, the verb form often just has the identical stem to the noun form.
Oct
5
answered Verb describing using a Taser on someone?
Oct
3
comment Why the does 'tu' get pronounced 'tyu' in British English?
Anyone want to explain why the close votes, instead of cowardly attempting to moderate from out of view?
Oct
3
comment Why the does 'tu' get pronounced 'tyu' in British English?
Hmm. The "ü" just sounds like a long "u" sound to me. Anyway, the original Latin was certainly just a long "u" sound.