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  • 25 votes cast
Feb
10
comment Can “did not” be used instead of “should not”?
@d'alar'cop Wait a moment, the speech about psychologist concludes, that "Starting out by looking for solutions was taking things entirely out of order. Like starting a meal with dessert, only bad." That is, it concludes that they should not start out immediately looking for the solutions.
Feb
10
comment Can “did not” be used instead of “should not”?
@d'alar'cop The speech about the psychologist concludes, that it's better to discuss the problem and do not look for the solutions. So "did not start out ..." was right thing to do, and if they "started ...", that would be wrong.
Nov
27
comment Which prepositions should I use after “do your best”?
@Tsuyoshi Ito, Robusto: According to "Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary" the "to" is a preposition, while indeed "while", "when" and "wherever" are conjunctions.
Nov
27
comment Which prepositions should I use after “do your best”?
@Robusto: Thank you for your fixes. I've applied them to the examples.
Nov
27
comment Which prepositions should I use after “do your best”?
@Robusto: Yes, I understand that many different prepositions can in principle follow "do your best". But I do have a problems with them only in the case, described above: i.e. when what I want to write using "Do your best <preposition> x." means "Deal with x as effectively as you can", like in the first 2 of your examples.
Nov
27
comment Which prepositions should I use after “do your best”?
Thank you, Martha. I've applied the fixes suggested by you.
Nov
27
comment “Spelt” vs. “spelled”
@ShreevatsaR Thank you. I've corrected the post.
Nov
22
comment How is “admire” used in “to admire them a great deal”?
Thank you. Now it's clear.
Nov
16
comment Can “divest” mean “strip or deprive”?
@RedDwight Thank you. Not only you have improved my question, but also have given me a possibility to see my mistakes and inaccuracies through the page english.stackexchange.com/posts/5102/revisions .
Nov
16
comment Can “divest” mean “strip or deprive”?
But Ok, I see that both meanings can be understood as a wide meaning of the word "strip" or "get rid of".
Nov
16
comment Can “divest” mean “strip or deprive”?
I'm not sure I understand you. That's probably because my English is not good enough: I'm just learning. But in your examples isn't it used as "sell" or "stop taking part in"? Doesn't Evonik plan to sell its carbon blacks unit? Haven't Universal Services Inc. agreed to sell four psychiatric hospitals?