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"My life is spent in one long effort to escape from the commonplaces of existence. These little problems help me to do so." (Sherlock Holmes)

I sometimes enjoy embedding puns and subtle self-references into many of my answers and comments.

Remember, context is everything.


Never make the mistake of thinking that a tiny preposition has only one meaning.


1d
comment Do I Capitalize someone's role?
There's a lot of guidance about this available on-line, although you may have to check a few different sites to get an answer to your specific example.
Oct
22
comment Semicolon or period in the following?
@Fumble - Only a guess, but it might have been Nick's comment that prompted the upvote. To the OP: The semi-colon in Instance 2 seems okay to me, but I'd have to side with your professor for Instance 1.
Oct
22
comment Best way to abbreviate income ranges
Given that all your tenths digits are 0, is there any compelling reason to use 3.0 and 5.0 as opposed to 3 and 5?
Oct
22
comment Best way to abbreviate income ranges
You have a problem in that 4,999,995 is neither between 3M and 4.9M, nor between between 5M and 7.9M, although that's not really an English problem. I think you're better off saying at or above 3M and below 5M for the second band, and at or above 5M and below 7M for the third.
Oct
19
comment Triple Commas not acceptable?
Your question title mentions "triple commas", but there are only two commas in the examples you are asking about. Perhaps you meant double commas? In any case, as others have said, it's not the number of commas at issue – it's the structure of the sentence.
Sep
12
comment In June–July 1967? Between June–July 1967?
Your vagueness makes your question hard to answer. There were what?
Sep
8
comment Word/phrase to refer to things you bring to a place to stay the night?
We are going to a trip tomorrow and staying the night in a hotel. Don't forget anything.
Sep
7
comment Forgiving our Fathers
You are asking about polysemy; I'll grant you that. However, your question is about literary interpretation, not English. For example: sure, the fact that "our fathers" can refer to our cultural ancestry or our dads is related to the English language, and that could lead into an on-topic question. However, when you ask if this particular poem means one or the other (or both), I don't really feel like that's on-topic any longer – though that's just my opinion. The way it's presented here, it feels a lot like "homework help."
Sep
4
comment What is the exact difference between “into” and “onto”?
In the future, a question like this one is probably better suited for English Language Learners.
Sep
4
comment What is the exact difference between “into” and “onto”?
RE: "Into" is used in the context of, say, walking into something like a building or room – don't read too much into that.
Sep
3
comment Can I omit “one” in the following case?
I understand that "reads fluently and looks good on paper" ≠ "can't be improved any further". However, I can imagine someone interpreting it that way, hence my comment. :^)
Sep
3
comment Can I omit “one” in the following case?
One could argue the "also" is redundant and that the sentence may read better without it.
Sep
3
comment Are prepositions a part of grammar or vocabulary?
I like what you said about intermediate usages; one could say that the O.P.'s example (in the morning) falls into this category.
Sep
3
comment Difference between “implementing” and “executing”?
That example sounds like contracting language, so the rules of "everyday English" may not apply. In other words, two words can be used interchangeably in day-to-day conversation, but have very specific meanings in a more specialized or formal context, as in the differences between the synonyms verify and validate.
Sep
3
comment How to distinguish between “however” and “whenever”?
Interestingly enough, I don't think that line from the Shakira song works if remove either of the two words, but they seem to work okay in tandem. Consequently, I might be tempted to punctuate is like this: Whenever, wherever – we're meant to be together.
Sep
1
comment The etymology of “redhead” vs. “ginger haired”
@tchrist - I wasn't referring so much to the term's origin as I was to its popularity. I mean, there's no reason it couldn't have shifted to orangehead once orange became a color.
Sep
1
comment The etymology of “redhead” vs. “ginger haired”
I wonder if "redhead" was preferred to "orangehead" simply because of the pleasing rhyme.
Aug
29
comment Accept and change
If the feedback caused you to change, then it seems like the "accept" part is already implied. Had you rejected the feedback, you would not have changed.
Aug
29
comment What does “bupke” mean?
Why would the question be a joke? If your answer only guesses at the interpretation of the cited passage, then it seems like a fair question to me.
Aug
28
comment One word for the person who spreads positive vibes and is very spiritual in nature
@Josh - I think there's some overlap. One definition of spiritual is "of a merciful or compassionate nature." In any case, it's going to be tough to find one word that encompasses all three characteristics – spiritual, kind-hearted, and spreading positive vibes – without spilling over into other areas as well. It's about as good a fit as anyone is likely to find; I was just trying to say that in a short comment.