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Feb
5
comment Four letters - one sound!
@sumelic - I like it; that explains laugh quite well.
Feb
5
comment Four letters - one sound!
This is more tongue-in-cheek than serious, but you could say that through has a digraph (ou) adjacent to two silent letters (gh), while cough has consecutive digraphs (ou and gh). @Rob - for what it's worth, Wikipedia has an entry on tetragraphs.
Feb
4
comment Best reply for is was a pleasure meeting you
Another Stack Exchange site that might be better for questions like this one is English Language Learners.
Feb
4
comment Thank you, you too have a great day?
You too works. So does: Thanks, you too. And Thank you; you have a great day, too. Even a short Same to you is fine. As a footnote, if English isn't your mother tongue, you might want to try English Language Learners.
Feb
4
comment Is “She is under the shower” a proper English sentence?
@Rathony - In that metaphorical use, it would probably be under a shower of criticism. Great usage point, though.
Jan
31
comment Is the sentence, “He’s too easily prone to pouts and feuds” grammatically right?
You got it right, twice. Both pouts and feuds are nouns in their plural forms, and What are you smoking? is a rhetorical question that could be paraphrased as: Are you high or drugs or something?
Jan
28
comment What is the difference between opinion and fact?
@Ricky - The Magna Carta is a rant? What an interesting opinion!
Jan
28
comment What is the difference between opinion and fact?
RE: please give me your definition of those two words - I wouldn't vote to close this because it's "primarily opinion-based," but I might vote to close this because it "entirely answerable with a dictionary." ;-) I can also see where one might vote to close it because it's a rant disguised as a question (that "So it came to me as a shock today" part strikes me as more like an unnecessary taunt at the community than the crux of a thoughtful discourse).
Jan
28
comment Is “sh*te” a swear word?
To those who haven't watched the show, it's probably important to point out that Groundskeeper Willie has a heavy Scottish accent.
Jan
28
comment Best or technical term for the act of including a *purposeful gaff* in writing?
The word baiting comes to mind, but I'm not sure if that's a recognized term for it. Then again, maybe clickbait is a term that describes what you're looking for?
Jan
26
comment What is an unmown lawn called?
Well, it's not really an unasked question – it's asked in the title of the question.
Jan
25
comment What do you call the action of alternatively walking and jogging to complete a Full Marathon?
This doesn't answer your question, but the "struggling for breath" part of your sentence reads awkward to me. Participants who are run-walking will often change from jogging to walking when they are out of breath, and then go back to jogging after they have caught their breath again. I can see "struggling for breath" if she ran to the finish, but it seems out-of-place when she's walking in intervals. As for limp, that can imply stiffness as well as injury, so it might be a good word. I wouldn't necessarily assume one who limped to the finish line had a sprain – it could be exhaustion.
Jan
25
comment What is an unmown lawn called?
If you don't mind using a golfing metaphor, you could humorously call this person's yard the deep rough.
Jan
25
comment What is an unmown lawn called?
It's not my downvote, but somehow I don't think the O.P. was after words like lawn and yard. Still, I can see what you were addressing: The O.P. said, To me "a lawn" conjures up an image of something well-kept, mowed green grass. You're pointing out that the word lawn can be used whether the grass is landscaped or not.
Jan
25
comment Like a reflection from the aspect of an angel
If English isn't your mother tongue, we'd be remiss not to at least inform you about the English Language Learners Stack Exchange, which you might find helpful for future questions.
Jan
20
comment When talking to American clients, should I say “smoothie” or “milkshake”?
I only learned the term lassi about a year ago. But I agree with this answer – if you're serving a lassi, call it a lassi, rather than trying to find the closest thing to a lassi in English. At worst, the visitors will look perplexed and ask, "What's a lassi?" At that point, the O.P. can reply, "It's kind of like a milkshake, only it has dried fruit and nuts mixed in."
Jan
15
comment What is the meaning of “Spin that record, babe!”
@Ricky - Both 77 and 78 have been obsolete for awhile, I think, except for mixing tracks on albums by the Chipmunks.
Jan
15
comment Is ''realisticness'' a real English word?
Actually, there are about 300 to 600 instances found on Google. (Keep paging through the results until you get to page 31 or 32, and see what happens.)
Jan
15
comment Are there words that are spelled the same but pronounced differently depending on whether the initial letter is capital or lowercase?
I really like your last one: tangier and Tangier. That reminds me: An interesting twist on this is the way some city names are pronounced differently in different locations. (Some good examples are in this list). As for there being 12, more could be added at any time. Nothing prevents someone from forming a company name from a random word and changing the pronunciation. I might elect to call my new company Horse, for example, and insist on it being pronounced as "hor-SAY".
Jan
15
comment Are there words that are spelled the same but pronounced differently depending on whether the initial letter is capital or lowercase?
My Chance card says, "Take a ride on the Reading. If you pass Go, collect $200."