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"My life is spent in one long effort to escape from the commonplaces of existence. These little problems help me to do so." (Sherlock Holmes)

I sometimes enjoy embedding puns and subtle self-references into many of my answers and comments.

Remember, context is everything.


Never make the mistake of thinking that a tiny preposition has only one meaning.


Nov
20
comment Is “tnetennba” a real word?
What's your definition of a "real word"? Is borogoves a real word?
Nov
19
comment How can I describe a low temperature that doesn't actually feel cold?
You're trying to describe the temperature. Perhaps you would have more luck describing your condition: I became acclimated to the cold.
Nov
19
comment A word to mean shine
In addition to that picture suggested by @curiousdannii you could also look up shine in a thesaurus, and tell us why words like sheen, luster, and shimmer aren't very suitable to your needs.
Nov
17
comment Oil is slippery; rubber is _____?
There are some interesting example usages of this word on the Wordnik page.
Nov
15
comment The use “habit ” as an alternative to “used to”
I'm wondering if this would not have been a better question for English Language Learners. To the O.P.: you can read this, and use that to figure out where you might want to ask future questions.
Nov
15
comment What is the opposite of an exhaustive list?
@Leo - In its current form, perhaps. But cursory list is a good option; it's an oft-used phrase that fits the O.P.'s bill. Rather than saying, "This should be a comment," I'd prefer to say, "Let's make this better; it's a good suggestion."
Nov
15
comment Who uses 'inveritable' and 'inveritably'?
I like the theory of mixing up (or inadvertently blending) invariably and inevitably. So, "Invariably, inevitably, he shows up late," becomes, "Inveritably, he shows up late."
Nov
15
comment What is the opposite of an exhaustive list?
Are you asking a question, or providing an answer? (I'd suggest quoting a couple places where this expression is used, to bolster the answer. As it stands now, it almost looks like you lengthened a two-word suggestion into a question just to meet the character minimum.)
Nov
14
comment Is there a common expression for someone who “always holds a mobile phone in hand”?
@medica - Every once in a while, the expression is very literal – like with this truck driver :^)
Nov
14
comment Confusing sentence, work or works?
You could avoid the problem by rewording and rearranging the sentence altogether: Multiple citations of my papers in just a short time after their publication attest to the quality of my work. But that doesn't really answer your interesting question.
Nov
14
comment Confusing sentence, work or works?
@Sistan - Don't be in such a hurry to accept an answer. Give it a day or so to see what kind of answers you might get.
Nov
14
comment Is there a single word for “visiting someone who is sick”
It's interesting how some dictionaries list that specific meaning (like Am Her Def #1b) while others (like Collins) don't. Even if that meaning is not universally listed, though, I still think the smattering of meanings that can be found make visit is a viable candidate, even if it doesn't always convey visiting a sick person – especially with a lack of other suggestions.
Nov
14
comment Is there a single word for “visiting someone who is sick”
@mplungjan - Just to be clear, I don't have any "grievances." I made an initial comment because of how the question was originally worded; my follow-on was just surmising what jwenting might have meant by "sadly." Perhaps the question could have been improved a little, but it wouldn't be reasonable to expect a first-time contributor to catch onto things that fast.
Nov
13
comment Opposite of respectively
I think reversely is a novel suggestion and it seems to flow well in the given context. That said, it's worth mentioning that when you see reversely in a text, it usually means something more along the lines of on the other hand, as opposed to specifying a corresponding order. For example, from this web page: Technology and trademark rights may be “licensed in” to allow product development, manufacturing, and distribution. Reversely, they can also be “licensed out” as part of a licensing program that monetizes intellectual property rights.
Nov
13
comment Is there a single word for “visiting someone who is sick”
@mplungjan - I think "sadly" here might stem from the fact that so many of these questions could be made more interesting if the O.P. spent a little time explaining why they want the word, or think there might be one. E.g., I find questions like this one and this one a delight to ponder and learn from, but when the question simply asks, "Is there a single word meaning such-and-such" with no motive, no background, no rhyme or reason, those questions seem to fall, well, sadly, a little flat.
Nov
13
comment Is there a single word for “visiting someone who is sick”
What makes you think there is a word, or that there's just one word? (Maybe you meant, "What's a word to describe..."?)
Nov
12
comment Where does the word “turkey baster” come from?
Judging by the comments up above, I don't think you want to ask. 8^)
Nov
11
comment A word to describe a product that has been iterated over many times?
I think "mature" is a good suggestion, but I also think this answer would be much improved if you either quoted a definition that uses that word in this sense, or maybe found a product review or something that used that word to convey this meaning (as opposed to answering with a question).
Nov
11
comment A word to describe a product that has been iterated over many times?
As a side note: polished doesn't necessary connote "clean" or "shiny". From NOAD, polished can mean "accomplished and skillful" (as in a polished performance), or it can mean "refined, sophisticated, or elegant".
Nov
11
comment “I” vs. “me” question
Given that English isn't your first language, you might want to check out English Language Learners. You might find some of your future questions to be more suitable for that site. See ELL vs ELU for more information.