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17h
comment Need help solving these analogies
@vijay - On the Stack Exchange, "homework" can be used as a general term, meaning "the kind of problems or questions one could expect to see on a test or in a homework assignment." Such please-tell-me-the-answer questions are not well-suited for this site.
17h
comment Is it correct to ask about the profession of a group of persons with “What are they?”
@Minnow - Or, "What do they do for a living?" (at least, that works in the U.S.). I agree about the ambiguity in "What are they?" What are they? They are Presbyterians. They are Democrats. They are very funny guys.
17h
comment Does 'lure' have a negative connotation
I agree – a better word would probably be attract.
17h
comment Does 'lure' have a negative connotation
This question is fine here, but seeing that you're new to the Stack Exchange, and you've mentioned "native speaker," I thought you might appreciate a pointer to our site for English Language Learners.
Apr
22
comment Longest lexicographic English word?
@EdwinAshworth - I think I used to sing a song to my kids with that word in it.
Apr
22
comment How to pronounce Isabirra (type of cheese)?
@Arpan - Great tip! It might be helpful to also provide a link to the Google translate page that provides pronunciation for that word.
Apr
22
comment Meaning and Origin of word “Pantheon”?
@Mari-LouA - I agree with you, but I agree with Dan, too. I think the O.P. should perhaps have elaborated a little bit by editing the question. "I am more interested in the meaning and origin as that will help with understanding its usage" is a bit vague. The comment "I would like to learn this word to use in other sentences too" helps quite a bit. I realize I'm a bit late in this conversation, but maybe these remarks can help the O.P. write a question the will be more well-received next time. And it might not be a bad idea to consider posting on English Language Learners, either.
Apr
22
comment How to pronounce Isabirra (type of cheese)?
This is a berra tough question...
Apr
21
comment You're at a restaurant waiting for a table. People leave a table, now can you say “a table just became free”?
@Christopher - A table can become free before it is ready. To the O.P.: I wonder if you wanted to ask this on English Language Learners; it seems like a better fit for that site.
Apr
17
comment How to refer to United States of America?
In contexts like this, some countries (like the Netherlands) always get a "the" put in front of their name. Leave the "the" in there. And the answer to your "sneaky" question is subjective, but I'd say, "Yes."
Apr
14
comment Is 'bug' a term or a slang word?
Given that moth legend, this is a really cool question – it's asking about etymology and entomology!
Apr
7
comment What are the Names of the People in a Quest?
As for the person who issues the quest, the word sponsor could work, particularly if the sponsor is funding the quest or expedition. As an example, the Encyclopædia Britannica mentions, "Columbus made his transatlantic voyages under the sponsorship of Ferdinand II and Isabella I."
Apr
4
comment What's the meaning of “down to go”?
If you sent a message that said "I am already downstair," then you might be interested in our sister site, English Language Learners. More information available here.
Apr
4
comment When and how to use “hasta luego”?
Rather than closing this question, I'd propose it be migrated to English Language Learners. English speakers borrow stock phrases from Spanish or French rather often; this would be a good question over at ELL.
Apr
1
comment What type of literary device is this?
@curiousdannii - We are in agreement. That said, sometimes an SE regular will say "should be closed" when they really mean to say "should be put on hold until we get additional information." Us veterans know what's trying to be said, but newcomers can read that "should be closed" and be put off by apparent rudeness.
Apr
1
comment What type of literary device is this?
@curiousdannii - RE: But unclear questions need to be closed no matter who asks them. Actually, I'd rephrase that a little bit: Unclear questions should be closed or improved no matter who asks them. In my mind, clarification is preferred over closure.
Apr
1
comment How do you say “can't choose” in a good way?
Is all-or-nothing too negative for your tastes?
Apr
1
comment How do you say “can't choose” in a good way?
I'd like this suggestion better if it used the more common idiom: it's a package deal.
Mar
30
comment How refer to the god and devil using pronouns and adverbs?
This question is fine right where it is, but, since you mentioned that English is not your native language, you may want to check out English Language Learners, too. (If you're wondering about the differences between the two sites, read this.)
Mar
30
comment Which English words are commonly misused by non-native English speakers?
Since you are a non-native speaker new to the Stack Exchange, you might be interested in checking out English Language Learners. (But don't re-ask this question there, because cross-posting of identical questions is discouraged across the network.)