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comment Is “He is being here” ever acceptable?
@DanBron - that comment you linked to reminds me of a game of Guess Who? I once played with my son. He asked me, "Is the person male or female?" I responded flatly, "Yes." :^) He never made that mistake again.
Aug
26
comment Is it ok to use finally at the end of the sentence like this?
You should read my sentence more carefully. :^)
Aug
25
comment What preposition is used with “amend”?
Why are you using amend instead of change? I don't think this is a good use of the word amend. You might amend a document, or a paragraph, but it doesn't seem like the right word to use for a two-character data field on a form.
Aug
24
comment Is it ok to use finally at the end of the sentence like this?
I think you may have answered too quickly.
Aug
20
comment Usage of question and exclamation marks with quotation marks in work of fiction
I found that same document here. Problem is, your example sentences here are not addressing that issue. Something like this would be more fitting: Do you think the last line of the movie should be "Let's get out of here"? The style guide recommends putting the question mark outside the quotes because the question mark goes with the "Do you think..." part, and not "Let's get out of here." If the character was asking a question instead, it would be different: Do you think the last line should be "Should we get out of here?"
Aug
20
comment Enter or insert into the orbit?
#3 is a viable option, too. Also from a NASA website: Phobos 2 arrived at Mars and was inserted into orbit on January 30.
Aug
20
comment Usage of question and exclamation marks with quotation marks in work of fiction
He referenced 3.2.11 as specific example What is 3.2.11? Can you quote it in your question?
Aug
20
comment Is there a single-word antonym for “Opportunity”?
I don't see adversity as a very fitting antonym. Example sentences: Next week we'll have the opportunity to go fishing. My daughter has an interview tomorrow - what an opportunity! I think misfortune would be a closer antonym than adversity: My daughter's interview got cancelled - what misfortune! Unfortunately, I can't go fishing next week.)
Aug
20
comment What would you call this “double entry” principle in English?
Independent can also connote outside, as in, "independently verified by an outside agency." (Your answer isn't wrong, but it could be considered a little ambiguous.)
Aug
19
comment Suggested alternatives for that horrible new noun 'nice-to-have'?
@JoeBlow - One other factor, I think, has to do with timing. I've noticed that, once an answer gets 30+ upvotes, it's hard for subsequent answers to make up ground. Had Edwin's suggestion been one of the first answers given (instead of the sixth), the voting totals might look quite different. This is partly because some people vote before all available options have been put on the table, and also because many SEers, after they have viewed a question and voted, are perhaps not so inclined to go back later and reevaluate based on newer answers that have been written.
Aug
19
comment Suggested alternatives for that horrible new noun 'nice-to-have'?
I agree with @O.M.Y. and I think the same holds true in reverse. "Maintenance shouldn’t be a bonus but an all-important necessity" doesn't quite match up with the spirit of the original. I do think added feature could work, though.
Aug
19
comment catch eye but not eyes
Caught my eye is not the only idiom or expression that uses the singular eye as opposed to the plural eyes. Others include: the apple of my eye, look me in the eye, as far as the eye can see, giving him the evil eye, keep an eye on my purse and keep your eye on the ball. Sometimes both can be found.
Aug
17
comment Meaning of sentence
@Fumble - I'm confused. When an O.P. ends a (first ever) question with "So what my friend want ask?" that seems like an ideal time to point out the Stack Exchange has another community probably better suited to handle such questions in the future – as opposed to calling it a "slightly ridiculous question" and leaving it at that.
Aug
17
comment Meaning of sentence
@FumbleFingers - The link would be for this user's future questions, not this one.
Aug
16
comment Meaning of sentence
@FumbleFingers - Don't you think a pointer to English Language Learners might be helpful here?
Aug
5
comment How to pronounce “Calm”?
To piggy-back on what @choster said, many online dictionaries have audio versions of the pronunciation, like this one. Just click on the little speaker icon. There's also forvo.com, which I wouldn't necessarily call a "good reference" for evidence purposes, but it's nonetheless useful in its own way.
Aug
4
comment Word for “void of people”
From Macmillan: empty (adj.) 1. containing nothing 2. containing no people 3. containing very few people or things. With that in mind, I can see how there would be ambiguity for empty street (it might imply a lack of traffic and a lack of people), but I think we can discern the meaning of empty lobby just by context.
Aug
4
comment Word for “void of people”
@Blackbird - that's what happens when you spurn perfectly suitable words. I don't think that empty restaurant implies there are no tables and chairs in the dining room.
Aug
3
comment I felt the (a?) sting of wounded pride
You've explained it well; either one could be used.
Aug
3
comment Word or phrase for “to create again, but better”
I had considered innovate but I like this suggestion much better.