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"My life is spent in one long effort to escape from the commonplaces of existence. These little problems help me to do so." (Sherlock Holmes)

I sometimes enjoy embedding puns and subtle self-references into many of my answers and comments.

Remember, context is everything.


Never make the mistake of thinking that a tiny preposition has only one meaning.


21h
awarded  Explainer
22h
awarded  Refiner
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Sep
24
revised using “general” instead of “brigadier general”
added 322 characters in body
Sep
24
answered using “general” instead of “brigadier general”
Sep
22
revised What’s the word to describe that I ——— your artwork?
added 112 characters in body
Sep
22
revised What’s the word to describe that I ——— your artwork?
rolled back to a previous revision
Sep
12
comment In June–July 1967? Between June–July 1967?
Your vagueness makes your question hard to answer. There were what?
Sep
12
answered In June–July 1967? Between June–July 1967?
Sep
10
awarded  Necromancer
Sep
9
comment English - Grammar
The first one is the correct one. The more interesting question might be why.
Sep
9
revised English - Grammar
deleted 3 characters in body
Sep
9
revised Difference between “please note” and “I would like to point out”
no need for ALL CAPS title
Sep
8
comment Word/phrase to refer to things you bring to a place to stay the night?
We are going to a trip tomorrow and staying the night in a hotel. Don't forget anything.
Sep
7
comment Forgiving our Fathers
You are asking about polysemy; I'll grant you that. However, your question is about literary interpretation, not English. For example: sure, the fact that "our fathers" can refer to our cultural ancestry or our dads is related to the English language, and that could lead into an on-topic question. However, when you ask if this particular poem means one or the other (or both), I don't really feel like that's on-topic any longer – though that's just my opinion. The way it's presented here, it feels a lot like "homework help."
Sep
5
answered What do you call a disgusting mixture you don't want to drink?
Sep
4
comment What is the exact difference between “into” and “onto”?
In the future, a question like this one is probably better suited for English Language Learners.
Sep
4
answered What is the exact difference between “into” and “onto”?
Sep
4
comment What is the exact difference between “into” and “onto”?
RE: "Into" is used in the context of, say, walking into something like a building or room – don't read too much into that.
Sep
3
comment Unrespect vs Disrespect
"ok to say" is rather nebulous. If the speaker is try to sound peculiar, then of course it is "ok" to say. If the speaker is trying to use formal/accepted/standard English (choose your own adjective), then it's probably best avoided.