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1d
comment Specific Word someone who has interest in particular area
I disagree that the most common word would be specialist. I may be interested in reading, playing guitar, and the New York Rangers, but unless I'm a book critic, have a music degree, or work as an ice hockey talent scout, I'm an enthusiast at best. The word specialist conjures images of podiatrists, pediatricians, oncologists, and heart surgeons, not someone who "shows interest" in a particular area. I do like votary, though. That's a cool word that begins with v, and, FWIW, it has no synonyms listed in my thesaurus app.
1d
comment Specific Word someone who has interest in particular area
The character count is designed to encourage you to bolster your answer with meaningful content, not express annoyance. You could summarize the meaning of pundit, write an example sentence, or quote a usage of the word from a cited news article. If you did all three, the answer would be much more likely to attract upvotes instead of downvotes. As it is now, many in this community would consider this an acceptable comment, but not a very good answer for this site.
Jul
26
answered Adjective pertaining to 'rainforest' or similar
Jul
14
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
13
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
3
comment Phrases you can say to people who are ashamed to eat at your house?
I'm wondering what's wrong with make yourself at home. Seems like a perfectly reasonable suggestion.
Jul
3
revised Phrases you can say to people who are ashamed to eat at your house?
edited body
Jul
3
comment Can “fainted” and “lost consciousness” be interchanged?
Is this in a medical report, or in a narrative at the corner bar?
Jul
3
comment Polite, non-profane equivalent to ‘kick a**’
(That said, I completely agree with your advice to steer clear of "birch" and "spank". I think "thrash" seems okay, but I wouldn't use "chastise" in this context, either.)
Jul
3
comment Polite, non-profane equivalent to ‘kick a**’
@j_random_hacker - If you were a sports fan in the U.S., you'd hear this verb often. I found a quite a few samples in a Google search: John Madden's 1976 Oakland Raiders drubbed the Minnesota Vikings 32-14 in Super Bowl XI to complete a 16-1 season; the Red Sox drubbed the White Sox 10-2 before one of Fenway's largest crowds of the year; The St. Louis Blues clinched a playoff spot Thursday when they drubbed the Calgary Flames; Old Dominion drubbed the Cavaliers at Davenport Field to the tune of a 14-5 blowout; the Seattle Seahawks drubbed the Denver Broncos, 43-8.
Jul
1
comment How to say this properly?
"The tree is what I am looking at." No, not formal enough. Why not?
Jun
30
comment Non-technical word or phrase to describe a data “query”
@Kristina - Maybe I've been in IT too long. I didn't think request was too technical, but we often become inured to how confusing these terms can be. (As a side note, one reason I offered this answer was because I thought parameters sounded too technical – funny how that works sometimes!)
Jun
30
answered Non-technical word or phrase to describe a data “query”
Jun
30
revised Mind Blowing vs. Mind Boggling
two spell fixes
Jun
30
answered Is there a word for someone who tends to find faults in others?
Jun
30
comment Is there a word for someone who tends to find faults in others?
@Josh - I was about to mention the same thing :^) Many dictionaries list the adjective fault-finding and the noun fault-finder.
Jun
27
comment Do fish smell or taste blood in water?
This may be true from a zoology perspective, but, from a language perspective, we could use smell to mean "sense" even if sharks had no nostrils. Fortunately, English is colorful enough to allow us to smell odorless things: You smell a rat, I smell something fishy, she smells something wrong with the data. In other words: "Is smelling as a verb strictly connected with air?" No, it's not – not when it's used figuratively.
Jun
27
comment SWF Seeks Strong Single-word Synonym
@TusharRaj - Yes, that's my opinion, too. It's a stretch. I get that. Nonetheless, the fact that one word could be used to replace play in two different contexts (to play a fiddle, to pass time aimlessly) was too irresistible to not mention. Had the O.P.'s #3 sentence said, "She was playing the xylophone," I would have never suggested or even mentioned fiddle. My intro was designed to be clever and humorous; my "real" answers to this question are off the bench and live. I thought this bunch of dedicated linguists and English enthusiasts would appreciate the pun. Maybe not.
Jun
27
revised Is this the proper use of considering?
moved quote from title to quote box in question
Jun
27
comment “I consider that …” in place of “I think that…”
I think this might be a duplicate of this question, although I think this question is written much better than that one.