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"My life is spent in one long effort to escape from the commonplaces of existence. These little problems help me to do so." (Sherlock Holmes)

I sometimes enjoy embedding puns and subtle self-references into many of my answers and comments.

Remember, context is everything.


Never make the mistake of thinking that a tiny preposition has only one meaning.


8h
comment How refer to the god and devil using pronouns and adverbs?
This question is fine right where it is, but, since you mentioned that English is not your native language, you may want to check out English Language Learners, too. (If you're wondering about the differences between the two sites, read this.)
8h
comment Which English words are commonly misused by non-native English speakers?
Since you are a non-native speaker new to the Stack Exchange, you might be interested in checking out English Language Learners. (But don't re-ask this question there, because cross-posting of identical questions is discouraged across the network.)
14h
comment Are there English figurative expressions equivalent to Japanese idiom 馬耳東風 meaning a person who doesn’t listen to other’s advice?
Except that a maverick can be used in a complimentary way – someone who doesn't just go along with the crowd.
15h
comment Spelling vs. Pronunciation of “hawk” and “walk”
"They sound the same so they should be spelled the same" – really? What about six and tricks? Or earth and birth? Or chase and lace? Or sign and line? Or toe and low? Or muff and rough? Oh, have you heard about the chic sheik? He was caught on a cot! You might find this article of some interest.
15h
comment What type of literary device is this?
@LittleEva - There's a good chance that "pain in your eyes" is metaphorical, too – unless the speaker happens to be an ophthalmologist. This could be referring to a look of sorrow on someone's face.
1d
comment “Each of us will tell you our own side ___ the story”?
@user2738698 - "to" can work in some contexts: there's another side to this story, e.g., would be grammatically correct. But I think "of" is the better preposition in this case.
2d
comment Correct use of “immaculate” in a compliment
Perhaps you should elaborate by telling us why you think that expression might be inappropriate. Also, tell us more about the circumstances. Is this woman your boss? A stranger in a cafe? A clerk at a store? Your sister's best friend? Many words can be suitable in some contexts yet highly inappropriate in others. (And please don't do so by responding in a comment down here, do so by editing your question.)
Mar
22
comment What word means a “male temptress”?
Where in that wiki does it say anything about an Adonis "enticing others into making bad decisions"?
Mar
16
comment “Technology” vs. “a technology”
@Edwin - Hmm... That was awhile ago; I don't know what I was trying to say there. That may have been a "pre-coffee comment."
Mar
13
comment “between” vs. “among”
@tchrist - You noticed I saved the best for last :^)
Mar
13
revised Emily Dickinson poetry
two blank spaces at the end of a line will force a line break
Mar
13
comment “between” vs. “among”
@tchrist - I recently had to do a little research of my own, and found similar results. I hope you don't mind me adding to your comprehensive answer here with some of my findings.
Mar
13
answered “between” vs. “among”
Mar
8
comment Phrases that express “to look around nervously”
Perhaps you could try to substantiate your answer, rather than adding nonsensical remarks to meet character minimums. (There's a reason character minimums were implemented; namely, to discourage two-word answers.)
Mar
8
revised Single word for making a situation doubly worse
substantiated the answer instead of just including gibberish to meet character minimum
Mar
8
revised What great writers have used coordinating conjunctions at the start of sentences?
bolded the "but" in the Huxley quote
Mar
6
comment “Too much pills and liquor” or “Too many pills and liquor”?
I understood your reasoning, I'm just wondering if there's a rule in a style guide or something that would back you up. (Incidentally, that's not a challenge; your answer has simply made me curious. If I manage to find one before you do, I'll mention it.)
Mar
5
comment “Too much pills and liquor” or “Too many pills and liquor”?
I like the theory; I wonder if there's some source that would corroborate it.
Mar
5
revised “Too much pills and liquor” or “Too many pills and liquor”?
tidied things up
Feb
23
comment Preposition following “boarded”
@WS2 - If your memory serves you right (and I have no reason to think it doesn't), and one can "actually board the train straight into a compartment," could you not just say, "She boarded his compartment" as well? Not sure a preposition is required.