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18h
comment Does a “fact” have to be true?
You're oversimplifying this, I'm afraid. Rightly or wrongly, anything can be called a fact, even if it's not verifiable. Beliefs, opinions, and judgment calls are often confused with facts. Even NOAD seems to be inconsistent with its example: "She lacks political experience" could easily be an erroneous assumption based on perceived stage fright or a bad outing at a debate.
2d
comment Should “ we studied it both on- and off-site” have both hyphens?
@Sankarane - You've said more to me in your comment than you did to the O.P. in your answer. Perhaps you ought to elaborate in your answer some, instead of having merely one terse, authoritative-sounding sentence backed up with one dictionary URL.
2d
comment Should “ we studied it both on- and off-site” have both hyphens?
@Fumble - For what it's worth, I would probably include the hyphen, to alert the reader that the word (in this case, on) is not a standalone preposition, but part of a hyphenated term to be completed further on in the sentence.
2d
comment Should “ we studied it both on- and off-site” have both hyphens?
According to that one reference you've provided, it can be spelled with a hyphen. However, language evolves – just think of words like on-line (now often spelled online). I can find a couple dictionaries that already spell offsite sans the hyphen: Wordnik and businessdictionary.com.
May
26
comment Correcting verb in parenthesis
@heeraw - You should include that detail in your question, not in a comment below your question. In any event, I'm not sure a question like this well be all that well-received here at a site designed for linguists and etymologists, but you might want to check out (not re-ask, but check out) English Language Learners.
May
26
comment Could you please answer me and where i have to use below words
Many words in English have multiple meanings. You can't condense those down to a single "correct" meaning.
May
24
comment Is there another way to write Gasping and Panting sounds?
I think the artist intends "huh" to be breathing in, and "phoo" to be breathing out.
May
24
comment Is a hamburger considered a sandwich?
This bacons the question (and I'm dying to know): DId CAPTCHA want the human to select three images, or two?
May
24
comment Is a hamburger considered a sandwich?
That's not a hamburger, that's a patty melt. (That's not a criticism, it's just an additional monkey wrench in your excellent answer.)
May
19
comment Can you sort by random?
Ward has neatly summarized PNRGs, but that's not the end of the story on that topic.
May
19
comment Can you sort by random?
Is it just me, or are you not quite parsing this correctly? I don't think you can just ignore the word hash here. You can most certainly assign a random number to each record in a table, and then you can sort the table by those randomly-generated numbers. That's sorting by a set of random numbers, which isn't necessarily the same as "sorting by random." P.S. @Catija - The numbers you get from here are random.
May
18
answered What is the best word or expression that describes the Hindi word “Jootha”?
May
14
revised When to choose em dash over parenthesis for parenthetical phrases?
modified the preposition to keep up with the times
May
12
comment Why is “Grab” so common in advertisments (and other places where it might not make much sense)?
You ought to add a few examples to your question. I was a little skeptical until I Googled the phrase. Some of these are surely poor translations into English, like this one: "So, never miss out to grab these offers now! At present, people are quite busy for engaging home and official works. They don’t have much time to have shopping with their families by visiting at local market." However, that may explain some of the hits, but it doesn't seem to explain every instance.
May
12
comment How to tell which -ing verbs you can use as a noun?
Sorry; I was just channeling my inner Groucho Marx.
May
12
comment What is the meaning of “tank” in this sentence?
@Area51 - Better yet, look in dictionaries, instead of Google. I recommend starting with onelook.
May
12
comment How to tell which -ing verbs you can use as a noun?
Unless, of course, we're talking about food: "He doesn't like my drinking, my nagging, or my dressing – he thinks I put too much celery in it." ;^)
May
11
revised I want to write there is a large quantity of people. Which of these is the correct form?
quote boxes instead of monospace
May
11
revised I want to write there is a large quantity of people. Which of these is the correct form?
added 1 character in body
May
11
reviewed Approve I want to write there is a large quantity of people. Which of these is the correct form?