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comment Non-technical word or phrase to describe a data “query”
@Kristina - Maybe I've been in IT too long. I didn't think request was too technical, but we often become inured to how confusing these terms can be. (As a side note, one reason I offered this answer was because I thought parameters sounded too technical – funny how that works sometimes!)
4h
answered Non-technical word or phrase to describe a data “query”
6h
comment What is the minimum number of objects in a stack?
I'd say it generally means more than two or three – and maybe even more than three or four – but I'm only speaking from intuition. The beauty of words like stack, though, is that they are not rigidly defined.
6h
revised Mind Blowing vs. Mind Boggling
two spell fixes
12h
answered Is there a word for someone who tends to find faults in others?
12h
comment Is there a word for someone who tends to find faults in others?
@Josh - I was about to mention the same thing :^) Many dictionaries list the adjective fault-finding and the noun fault-finder.
2d
comment Can anyone point out where my grammar was wrong?
That said, ELL has the same policy about proofreading.
Jun
27
comment Do fish smell or taste blood in water?
This may be true from a zoology perspective, but, from a language perspective, we could use smell to mean "sense" even if sharks had no nostrils. Fortunately, English is colorful enough to allow us to smell odorless things: You smell a rat, I smell something fishy, she smells something wrong with the data. In other words: "Is smelling as a verb strictly connected with air?" No, it's not – not when it's used figuratively.
Jun
27
comment SWF Seeks Strong Single-word Synonym
@TusharRaj - Yes, that's my opinion, too. It's a stretch. I get that. Nonetheless, the fact that one word could be used to replace play in two different contexts (to play a fiddle, to pass time aimlessly) was too irresistible to not mention. Had the O.P.'s #3 sentence said, "She was playing the xylophone," I would have never suggested or even mentioned fiddle. My intro was designed to be clever and humorous; my "real" answers to this question are off the bench and live. I thought this bunch of dedicated linguists and English enthusiasts would appreciate the pun. Maybe not.
Jun
27
revised Is this the proper use of considering?
moved quote from title to quote box in question
Jun
27
comment “I consider that …” in place of “I think that…”
I think this might be a duplicate of this question, although I think this question is written much better than that one.
Jun
27
comment SWF Seeks Strong Single-word Synonym
@JanusBahsJacquet - Of course! But, given the playful nature of this question, I thought it was worth sharing a playful stab at a synonym – particularly a single word that could fit into both sentences. (In other words, try reading my answer in the same tone of question – I was trying to be "game".) As for the naughtiness of it, it needn't sound naughty, if we provide a bit more context: He was fiddling in his room, tinkering with the radio. Sounds harmless enough to me.
Jun
27
answered SWF Seeks Strong Single-word Synonym
Jun
27
comment What's the difference between “case by case” and “case to case”?
I wonder if it might be generational, much like by accident vs on accident seems to be.
Jun
26
comment An epic word for a small wooded area
How about: "Kidney Isle"
Jun
24
comment Why there is difference in pronunciation of words PUT and CUT?
@sumelic - I would think a question like this should at least explain a little bit about why it asks about these two words, and not, say, shoe and hoe, or how and show, or blood and food, or have and save, or glove and clove, or bead and bread, or rouse and house, or hearth and earth, or doll and roll. (Or, it could ask the more general question.) Moreover, hovering over the downvote button, I see, "This question does not show any research effort," and I think an "I always wonder why..." question falls under that category.
Jun
24
answered What is deliberately using complex sentences to confuse people called?
Jun
24
comment What is the proper way to cross-reference a section within the same document?
RE: I learned years ago that a comma always goes before a quotation mark and never after one - "never" is such a strong word, especially on a shrinking planet. Anyhow, I'm guessing you attended school in the United States.
Jun
24
revised What is the proper way to cross-reference a section within the same document?
I think this references quote marks, not parens.
Jun
24
comment Do the sentences make sense?
Also, if you can't give your question a more specific title than: Do these make sense? or Do these sound natural? then it's probably not a very good fit for this site. Try a more specific title, like: The proper way to make relative comparisons, or something like that. Also, if your question is motivated in part by novice English skills, you might want to check out English Language Learners, though that community values specific questions just as much as this one does.