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"My life is spent in one long effort to escape from the commonplaces of existence. These little problems help me to do so." (Sherlock Holmes)

I sometimes enjoy embedding puns and subtle self-references into many of my answers and comments.

Remember, context is everything.


Never make the mistake of thinking that a tiny preposition has only one meaning.


19h
comment “We're pregnant!”
@Janus - Yes, there are contexts where I might use the plural pronoun. Say the next day we were supposed to go rake leaves in a park, but she partied too hard last night. When I get the phone call asking, "Are you two still meeting us at noon?" I might answer, "No, we have a hangover." Sure, only my wife's head is pounding, not mine, but a hangover is still the reason we can't go. Also, that doesn't cast her in quite as bad a light as if I said, "No, she has a hangover," which might come across as, "She is irresponsible, but not me." It might depend on if I'm feeling annoyed or understanding.
1d
comment “We're pregnant!”
@HighPerformanceMark - Would you be just as nauseated if the couple exclaimed, "We're going to have a baby!" That's essentially what the couple is saying. As for "taking the full share of effort that pregnancy demands," there's no comparison regarding who's life will affected more for the next nine months. However, about a year later, a lot of dads are indeed playing a pretty big role in parenting. The lifestyle changes don't end at childbirth, which is why some couples might find the expression more acceptable than you.
1d
revised What great writers have used coordinating conjunctions at the start of sentences?
added 9 characters in body
1d
answered What great writers have used coordinating conjunctions at the start of sentences?
Aug
18
revised What is the meaning of “all zero at the bone”? I can't make it out
formatted stanza into four lines, as in original
Aug
18
revised What is the meaning of “all zero at the bone”? I can't make it out
formatting
Aug
18
accepted Word that corresponds to “flew” or “drove” when riding a train
Aug
13
awarded  Popular Question
Aug
9
comment Word that corresponds to “flew” or “drove” when riding a train
@Edwin - Yes! You mean words like laundover (n.) a sock or other (usually small) article of clothing that should have gone into the previous wash load, but didn't. Usually found when the last laundry load is on the spin cycle, sometimes resulting in a mild oath upon discovery. I still remember these as sniglets.
Aug
9
awarded  Curious
Aug
8
comment Word that corresponds to “flew” or “drove” when riding a train
@Edwin - I asked because I was unsure if the language was 'defective', or if my knowledge of the language was incomplete. Probably both are true :-)
Aug
8
comment Word meaning “kicking softly” or “brushing with the feet”?
I think shuffling works, too, with the right preposition: I walked to the wall window, shuffling through the sawdust on the floor.
Aug
8
comment What is the best way to forcefully say each word in a sentence.
Best. Question. Ever. (Thanks to The Simpsons, I've seen this speech construct represented with single-word sentences.)
Aug
8
comment How do I say a calculated decimal has too many decimal places?
Program cannot accept more than 6 digits after the decimal point. The terminology is elementary, not scientific, but sometimes that's what you want in an error message.
Aug
8
revised How do I say a calculated decimal has too many decimal places?
removed extraneous statements
Aug
8
awarded  Nice Question
Aug
8
comment 'Closest Healing' or another phrase for a book title?
@Jung - Maybe after you've completed your second installment, you can ask another question about "Easiest" vs. "Simplest".
Aug
8
comment Word that corresponds to “flew” or “drove” when riding a train
@ErikE - dictionaries seem to indicate either is acceptable: verb Word forms: buses, busing, bused, busses, bussing, bussed, although writers seem to prefer your suggested choice.
Aug
8
asked Word that corresponds to “flew” or “drove” when riding a train
Aug
6
comment What does “to spit a rat” mean?
@Rupe - A rat is more "spittable" than, say, a kangaroo, which couldn't even fit in one's mouth. By "spittable" I only meant to say "able to fit in someone's mouth," not "small and aerodynamic like a watermelon seed."