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23h
revised Location - sentence constructions
added 6 characters in body
23h
answered Location - sentence constructions
1d
comment How to refer to United States of America?
In contexts like this, some countries (like the Netherlands) always get a "the" put in front of their name. Leave the "the" in there. And the answer to your "sneaky" question is subjective, but I'd say, "Yes."
1d
reviewed Approve How to refer to United States of America?
Apr
14
comment Is 'bug' a term or a slang word?
Given that moth legend, this is a really cool question – it's asking about etymology and entomology!
Apr
14
revised Is there a word that means cheating but legitimate?
quote box
Apr
7
comment What are the Names of the People in a Quest?
As for the person who issues the quest, the word sponsor could work, particularly if the sponsor is funding the quest or expedition. As an example, the Encyclopædia Britannica mentions, "Columbus made his transatlantic voyages under the sponsorship of Ferdinand II and Isabella I."
Apr
5
revised Word that describes terms that exclude or divide people
deleted 6 characters in body
Apr
4
comment What's the meaning of “down to go”?
If you sent a message that said "I am already downstair," then you might be interested in our sister site, English Language Learners. More information available here.
Apr
4
comment When and how to use “hasta luego”?
Rather than closing this question, I'd propose it be migrated to English Language Learners. English speakers borrow stock phrases from Spanish or French rather often; this would be a good question over at ELL.
Apr
1
comment What type of literary device is this?
@curiousdannii - We are in agreement. That said, sometimes an SE regular will say "should be closed" when they really mean to say "should be put on hold until we get additional information." Us veterans know what's trying to be said, but newcomers can read that "should be closed" and be put off by apparent rudeness.
Apr
1
comment What type of literary device is this?
@curiousdannii - RE: But unclear questions need to be closed no matter who asks them. Actually, I'd rephrase that a little bit: Unclear questions should be closed or improved no matter who asks them. In my mind, clarification is preferred over closure.
Apr
1
answered How do you say “can't choose” in a good way?
Apr
1
comment How do you say “can't choose” in a good way?
Is all-or-nothing too negative for your tastes?
Apr
1
comment How do you say “can't choose” in a good way?
I'd like this suggestion better if it used the more common idiom: it's a package deal.
Apr
1
answered Looking for concise and precise terms for feedback rating options
Mar
30
comment How refer to the god and devil using pronouns and adverbs?
This question is fine right where it is, but, since you mentioned that English is not your native language, you may want to check out English Language Learners, too. (If you're wondering about the differences between the two sites, read this.)
Mar
30
comment Which English words are commonly misused by non-native English speakers?
Since you are a non-native speaker new to the Stack Exchange, you might be interested in checking out English Language Learners. (But don't re-ask this question there, because cross-posting of identical questions is discouraged across the network.)
Mar
30
comment Are there English figurative expressions equivalent to Japanese idiom 馬耳東風 meaning a person who doesn’t listen to other’s advice?
Except that a maverick can be used in a complimentary way – someone who doesn't just go along with the crowd.
Mar
30
comment What type of literary device is this?
@LittleEva - There's a good chance that "pain in your eyes" is metaphorical, too – unless the speaker happens to be an ophthalmologist. This could be referring to a look of sorrow on someone's face.