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"My life is spent in one long effort to escape from the commonplaces of existence. These little problems help me to do so." (Sherlock Holmes)

I sometimes enjoy embedding puns and subtle self-references into many of my answers and comments.

Remember, context is everything.


Never make the mistake of thinking that a tiny preposition has only one meaning.


Apr
22
comment Check out of, check into - meaning
@andy256 - Check out this user's 35 questions‌​, then ask yourself if maybe user69786 could benefit from learning about another Stack Exchange site that might prove beneficial. I never mentioned anything about this question being migrated.
Apr
20
answered How to point out the year 2000?
Apr
20
revised Is there a word to describe the state of being the only one of something?
deleted 2 characters in body
Apr
20
comment Check out of, check into - meaning
You may want to check out English Language Learners.
Apr
20
comment How do you address people at the beginning of a conversation?
I don't know if I'd go so far as to say one should "definitely avoid the term ma'am," but I agree that it wouldn't hurt to be a bit more careful with "ma'am" than with "sir."
Apr
20
comment How do you address people at the beginning of a conversation?
@Frank - For the most part, the closest equivalent to sir in the U.S. would be ma'am (but I'll grant that ma'am may not be quite as universally applicable in all contexts).
Apr
20
comment How do you address people at the beginning of a conversation?
Ms. is explained here. Mrs. = Misses; Miss does not have an abbreviation, and Ms. does not have an expanded form.
Apr
20
revised To have a game in hand
put the expression in question into the body of the question. Also used ">" to offset the quote in a quote box.
Apr
20
answered How do you address people at the beginning of a conversation?
Apr
19
comment Is there a word for one side in a pair?
What about half? That seems generic enough. It can be applied to apples, oranges, quiz teams, or marital relationships.
Apr
18
awarded  Great Answer
Apr
17
comment How to describe humanities students in one word
@ThirdNews - Maybe it's contagious...
Apr
16
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
16
comment Can 'Too+an adjective' be used to make a non-negative statement?
I agree that it's all too easy to come up with negative examples (my feet are too tired, my car is too old, my dentist is too grumpy) than positive usages of "too." But the question didn't ask if positive usages were "common"; it merely asked if there were "any." I agree with John Lawler's explanation of why these are not very abundant.
Apr
16
answered Can 'Too+an adjective' be used to make a non-negative statement?
Apr
16
comment Is “have the steel” an idiom in the statement, “Mitt Romney would have the steel to order the 2011 operation that killed Osama bin Laden in Pakistan”?
A related idiom is have the stones, but perhaps the author thought that was too vulgar for Time.
Apr
14
comment What would you call size that fits between small and medium?
I like this approach, although my recommendation would be to go in the other direction, so that the four button sizes are ultimately small, medium, large, and extra large. (Or, if the O.P. would prefer a single word, jumbo could be used instead of extra large.)
Apr
14
reviewed Edit suggested edit on What would you call size that fits between small and medium?
Apr
14
revised What would you call size that fits between small and medium?
line content is the same
Apr
14
revised Which is the correct 'apostrophe' to use when typing? ' (quote) or ` (back-tick)
added remarks from website