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Apr
30
comment Meaning of word with definite article the for a facebook page?
Out of those six options, I'd likely only buy a cake from The Cake Fairy.
Apr
26
comment What non-religious expressions can I use instead of “Thank God”?
@DavidP - That's precisely why I phrased that as a question for the O.P., and put the word irreligious in scare quotes. It's a judgment call.
Apr
26
comment Is it appropriate not to capitalize “I” if i personally view it as vanity on cultural grounds?
And I am sorry if my answer seemed "aggressive." I didn't mean to make any kind of personal attack, and any strong verbiage about the article was more an indictment on the educational establishment for purporting such myths, rather than at your question for mentioning one. You took a lot of flak, but I thought your question was worth answering. Perhaps you would have had a kindler, gentler response over at English Language Learners. Maybe I'll see you over there sometime.
Apr
26
answered Is it appropriate not to capitalize “I” if i personally view it as vanity on cultural grounds?
Apr
26
comment What non-religious expressions can I use instead of “Thank God”?
Is thank goodness not "irreligious" enough for you?
Apr
25
comment Is “[name], hi” a correct and/or acceptable email salutation?
Cody, hi. If it were me writing the message, I'd probably reverse the two words, but I can't think of any reason why it might be considered ungrammatical, incorrect, or unacceptable. At worst, it's perhaps "nontraditional."
Apr
25
comment Can I use “some” as a synonym of “very”?
@HotLicks - T-shirts? Probably not. But if you drove off the lot back to your driveway, and I said, "Wow! That's some car!" I probably wouldn't mean that it's unusual or peculiar.
Apr
25
comment Can I use “some” as a synonym of “very”?
@HotLicks - But it could be a compliment. No way to say for sure, though, without hearing the intonation, and perhaps seeing the looks of envy.
Apr
25
comment Can I use “some” as a synonym of “very”?
This is some answer! (I mean that as a compliment.) Mostly, though, I liked the way you say that it can be used positively or negatively. Consider: Her brother just got paroled for the third time. He is some brother! That's a put-down, but: Her sister just graduated cum laude from Cal Tech. She's some sister! That's intended as a compliment, much in the way Charlotte used the word.
Apr
24
comment Is it conceivable that President Obama might use the word “queue”?
Just because a word is in the dictionary doesn't mean it's widely used. As for that ngram, that shows a large spike in usage right around the advent of computing, so I'm guessing most of those hits have nothing to do with "back of the line" usages.
Apr
23
comment Tired in an enjoyable way
Just a word of caution: Other dictionaries seem to define the term quite differently, and in the U.S., it often means drunk.
Apr
21
comment Is “He died himself.” a correct sentence?
I'd upvote this answer if you figured out the "real grammatical term" for it.
Apr
19
comment what would you call someone that enjoy making friends
There isn't just one word, there are several. And you may be interested in English Language Learners for future questions (read this for more information about that).
Apr
16
comment Send something through / by / per / via email?
I know this doesn't answer your question, but you could just say: I will email all further details.
Apr
16
revised Question about the meaning of a sentence
deleted 4 characters in body
Apr
15
answered A boss who rejects questions, or chooses not to discuss reality
Apr
15
comment A boss who rejects questions, or chooses not to discuss reality
Must the word describe a boss? Or can it describe any individual who consistently dismisses hard questions and instead defers to lighter topics?
Apr
13
comment An employee called me “boss”, but I don't like it. How can I colloquially say that?
@DCShannon - What you said. And maybe put a please in front of it for good measure: Please don't call me "boss" anymore; I'd rather be called by my first name.
Apr
13
comment Is it okay to use the indefinite article before “week” in the phrase “Friday is a day of A week”?
I had similar thoughts. If we are allowed to tweak the words inside the quotation, then, yes, we can jam in an indefinite article. (My example was: Friday is the last day of a work week.) But I'm having trouble thinking of a good example where we'd say "Friday is a day of a week” without adding or changing any words inside the quotation marks. Maybe Friday is a day of a week of the month, but I don't know how realistic that is.
Apr
12
comment waste money into or on?
@Lawrence - Okay, gotcha. I see what you were getting at now. Good question.