304 reputation
210
bio website facebook.com/thenonsequitur
location New York, NY
age 30
visits member for 2 years, 2 months
seen Mar 19 at 19:49
puts 10.downto(1).each{ |i| puts i }
puts 'Blast off!'

puts (10.downto(1).map{ |i| i.to_s } + ['Blast Off!']).join("\n")

(1..10).to_a.reverse.each{ |i| puts i }
puts 'Blast off!'

May
14
comment Achievement Verbs with the Progressive Aspect
And the real distinction is that progressive actions on what the author calls punctual verbs are non-nonsensical and/or awkward, whereas progressive actions on change-of-state verbs are natural. But it's important to note that these are the author's own definitions, and by no means restrictive and well-defined categories. "He is spotting the airplane" makes sense if he has had his eye to the sky waiting for an airplane to appear, but not if it was out of the blue. OTOH, since "recognize" carries with it a connotation of surprise, progressive aspect rarely makes sense for that verb.
May
14
comment Achievement Verbs with the Progressive Aspect
Honestly, I think the author is just confused here. He starts by saying "Change of state ... This involves a preliminary activity that culminates in the act denoted by the verb.". Then goes on to use "recognize" as an example of change-of-state verb. What is the preliminary activity that culminates in "recognizing"? There isn't any. By the author's own definitions, "recognize" is a "punctual" verb.
May
3
answered What are different kinds of shops based on the size, structure and location?
May
3
comment What is “plaice” in the US? Would love a good fish and chips
I know at the Chip Chop in NYC (a pretty famous restaurant) you can actually order "Plaice & Chips" (you can also order Cod or Haddock). The Chip Chop attempts to be at least somewhat authentically British though -- other than at that restaurant I've never heard the term "plaice" in the United States.
May
3
comment When did “Easter egg” begin to mean “hidden feature”?
@user867, well, yeah, that's clearly the derivation. Just as one might hide physical easter eggs on easter, a programmer might hide digital easter eggs in a program. But the derivation alone doesn't answer the OP's question of when it took on the new meaning.
Apr
29
answered Word for “Intellectual Prankster”
Apr
29
comment Should I say “I make a living by teaching” or “I make a living teaching”? Which one is correct? Is the preposition 'by' necessary?
I'm curious, did your English teacher tell you in what way they thought it makes the meaning change? To me, both phrasings are correct and they both mean the same thing.
Apr
29
answered It's 2013, where's my flying car?
Apr
28
comment It's 2013, where's my flying car?
Not only is this not answering the actual question, I think it's technically wrong as well. Sure, it's a comma-splice. But a comma-splice is not always an error. The example sentences are exactly the sort of contexts where a comma-splice is appropriate.
Apr
28
comment Plural or singular when stating that an amount is enough
Your friend's edit was incorrect. Both versions of that sentence are grammatical, but your friend's edit made it mean something nonsensical. "A handful of iterations were generally enough" refers to a specific (handful-sized) set of iterations, and says that these iterations were generally enough. This makes no sense. On the other hand, your wording "A handful of iterations was generally enough" means exactly what you want it to.
Apr
19
comment Can I use the word “milks” when discussing KINDS of milk
It's true that "types of milk" or "kinds of milk" is way more common but that doesn't make the uncommon variation ungrammatical.
Apr
19
comment Can I use the word “milks” when discussing KINDS of milk
That's just your own bias speaking, this is perfectly grammatical and there is nothing lazy about it. Search google for "several milks" and look through the pages of results -- you'll see dozens upon dozens of uses by English speakers in varying contexts, including colloquial and scientific contexts. A few are using them as a substitute for countable "cartons of milk" but most are using in the "kinds of milk" sense.
Apr
19
comment Opposite of “verbose”
+1. It should also be noted that in hacker jargon, verbose and terse are pretty much perfect antonyms. Many linux command line tools have "terse" modes vs. "verbose" modes (to indicate how much status information they should output as they perform their operation).
Apr
13
awarded  Quorum
Apr
5
comment Non-rhotic dialects and intrusive r
@jbeldock, Staten Island's Italian-Americans have at least what appears to be a partly non-rhotic dialect, in my experience (I have no official source, I just visit there a lot). Intrusive 'r' seems to occasionally appear in that dialect as well.
Mar
30
comment Racial connotations of the word “uppity”
@donothingsuccessfully, sorry, misread that. So now at least I understand the objection. I disagree with that objection though. I think it's perfectly fine that the OP included that in the post because whether or not you agree with that analysis, it does a good job of showing an example of what "uppity" might apply to.
Mar
29
comment permit vs cause causality
Are you using technical linguistic terms? If so, you may have better luck on Linguistics SE.
Mar
29
comment Quintessential vs essential?
Where do you see these being used interchangeably? They have quite different menaings.
Mar
29
comment Racial connotations of the word “uppity”
@donothingsuccessfully, but a broader social context is exactly what this answer needed to be complete!
Mar
22
comment Is an “acronoun” a real concept?
Not sure if this is technically a dupe (someone more familiar with ELU can probably decide), but the accepted answer here does answer your question, I think: english.stackexchange.com/questions/29374/pronouncing-acronyms