305 reputation
212
bio website facebook.com/thenonsequitur
location New York, NY
age 31
visits member for 2 years, 7 months
seen Sep 9 at 14:49
puts 10.downto(1).each{ |i| puts i }
puts 'Blast off!'

puts (10.downto(1).map{ |i| i.to_s } + ['Blast Off!']).join("\n")

(1..10).to_a.reverse.each{ |i| puts i }
puts 'Blast off!'

Aug
4
awarded  Popular Question
Jun
9
awarded  Caucus
May
1
comment “1 in 10 are” or “1 in 10 is”?
@supercat, good observation! I completely agree with that.
Mar
7
comment “Many people” vs. “much people” — which one should be used?
Which one should be used? Depends on whether you're writing standard or doge.
Feb
14
accepted Did the slang term “The Bomb” meaning “Very Cool” come from the American Jazz scene?
Feb
13
comment Did the slang term “The Bomb” meaning “Very Cool” come from the American Jazz scene?
It's not clear that in the phrase "the crescent is the bomb", "the bomb" has this meaning. And all the other references listed here, where it's much more obvious that this meaning is being used, date from 1994+.
Feb
13
comment Did the slang term “The Bomb” meaning “Very Cool” come from the American Jazz scene?
This is quite comprehensive, thanks! I'm curious though what you think about the 1973 reference listed here: books.google.com/… -- do you thank that's just a mistake that it's included here?
Feb
11
revised Did the slang term “The Bomb” meaning “Very Cool” come from the American Jazz scene?
added 3 characters in body
Feb
11
asked Did the slang term “The Bomb” meaning “Very Cool” come from the American Jazz scene?
Dec
6
comment Factitious v. Fictitious
The way I like to think of it: factitious => contrived, fictitious => imagined.
Dec
6
comment What do you call a person who keeps on going despite setbacks? (in one word, a noun)
+1 For trooper. I think that's exactly the right term.
Nov
5
comment How to punctuate math fractions?
"one would never read or write '300/2000' as 'three hundred ... two thousandths'". Do you have a source for this assertion?
Oct
18
comment Word for describing someone whose name is the opposite of what they are?
If you want a source, see the wikipedia article. This explains the way the word is used much better than your cited dictionary definitions (and I'd even argue that that first cited definition of yours is poorly worded definition that doesn't really give the whole story).
Oct
18
comment Word for describing someone whose name is the opposite of what they are?
I don't think a misnomer has to necessarily be a deliberate act of naming, but using it does imply that a name is incorrect, inaccurate, or misleading. Consider the firefighter named Arson. It would be absurd to say that the firefighter's name is incorrect, inaccurate, or misleading because of his chosen profession. But that's exactly what you'd be doing by calling it a "misnomer".
Oct
18
comment The Origin of “Killing It”
Why would the origin be different in this case? I don't see how this isn't a duplicate of the question you linked. Also, I agree with @BraddSzonye -- I've never heard this with the implication that the the piece is no longer fashionable, or done for, or anything like that -- just that it was performed really well.
Oct
18
comment prefix for “possible”, “supposed”, “potential” etc.?
I scanned the English prefixes wikipedia article and didn't see anything like what you're looking for. I'm also curious of the specific use case you have in mind.
Oct
11
comment What's exactly I'mma? I'mma go now, I'mma open that for you
Your statement of fact about the meaning of the contraction is correct (or at least plausible, but see T.E.D.s answer), but I think all of your value judgements are off. It's standard slang, especially in certain dialects, not "very casual slang" and it is most often used sincerely. It's only a joke or used as lolspeak, as far as I know, when tied to one particular Kanye West meme ("I'mma let you finish but...").
Oct
11
comment Why does left come before right?
@JohnLawler, do you happen to know the specific phonological or semantic rules out of those in the cited paper that might be responsible for the word order in this particular case, "left and right"?
Oct
7
comment What's the opposite of “extending the deadline”?
But more importantly, even if that was your point, you are then just making a comment that is not even linguistically relevant -- how does this answer the question at all?
Oct
7
comment What's the opposite of “extending the deadline”?
@Kris, the very first line of your answer says, "The term extending the deadline is itself incorrect". That doesn't sound so much like your point was that it is simply formally illogical.