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If this area had been blank it would have been intentional.


Aug
23
comment A short, colloquial way of saying “make up your own mind”
That's for you to decide.
Aug
23
comment “driving across the state” or “driving across state”?
For example: When I was young (living in New York) our family went on a cross-country trip for our vacation and visited my cousins in California.
Aug
22
comment If I believe that AAVE is a legitimate dialect of English, am I a linguistic prescriptivist or a descriptivist?
It is incorrect. It should be, "He be chillin'."
Aug
22
comment “driving across the state” or “driving across state”?
You can also say, "cross-state" and "cross-country"
Aug
22
comment Is it proper to use a cause clause as the major statement of a fact?
As is used here to mean because. And as my English teach told me: "Be careful using as to mean because, as it can lead to confusion."
Aug
22
comment English, Latin, or Malay pronunciation of betta fish
This is where dictionaries come in handy. Merriam-Webster says betta rhymes with feta. merriam-webster.com/dictionary/betta
Aug
22
comment I don't like [you to go there]
In the OALD example like is used as want but don't like means something different than don't want, So you need to use: "I don't want you to go there. For (2) some people may say, "I don't like for you to go there." but (1) is preferable.
Aug
21
comment “We're pregnant!”
Why do you ask about an acceptable use of the word pregnant? To me it's a question of an acceptable use of the word We.
Aug
21
comment Is there one word for knowledge and wisdom that has been obtained from different sources and from experience?
Accumulated wisdom or collected wisdom are the generally used terms for this.
Aug
21
comment Is there a more general word for velocitized?
mundane fits the blank in your sentence but is nowhere close to your "velocitized" word. Desenitized might be closer.
Aug
21
comment Distinguishing between “opposites” of “ortho-”
How about merlinchronous?? ;-)
Aug
21
comment Term of endearment for either parent?
It's more playful, tongue-in-cheek than really endearing but I've often heard "parental units" used.
Aug
21
comment What is the Specific Type of Word that Includes Stellar, Sylvan, etc
That term was un-nouned to me as well!
Aug
20
comment Can a symmetry be “broken down” (to a lower symmetry)?
I, for one, completely agree with you- I'd choose "reduce" over "break down" for the situation you describe. Or perhaps I'd say the when a symmetry is broken it is either broken completely (no symmetry remains) or partially ( a reduced level of symmetry remains) HOWEVER, if the convention among domain experts in your field is to "break down symmetries" you ought to follow right along.
Aug
20
comment Would using moot and oxymoron in a sentence as this one be correct? “Nothing is more oxymoronic than stating a 'moot point' in a discussion forum”
I think this citation is relevant: (3) That point may make for a good discussion, but it is moot.
Aug
20
comment Under what circumstances is the word “that” necessary, optional, or to be replaced with “which”?
Your request is impossible: You've asked for an example of a similar case (i.e., one that doesn't require it) that does require it.
Aug
20
comment Is it correct to say 'Once we are done with work we will update you.'?
It's impossible to say without some context. Your sentence is grammatical and fits a possible scenario, however I suspect you are looking for "Once we are done with the work, we will update you."
Aug
20
comment Under what circumstances is the word “that” necessary, optional, or to be replaced with “which”?
You can omit it from every example you've given.
Aug
20
comment Can I use 'drenching' to mean 'being drenched'?
You can say that you are totally drenched from the rain because you are the object of the drenching. The result of a drenching is to be drenched- it's still the rain acting on you.
Aug
20
comment What is the actual word for Leaving Out an Examination?
In that case "Drop" (not dropped) would be appropriate. It is an instruction to the examiner "[Please] drop [this test]" After the examiner has followed that instruction it might be labelled as dropped but the student is providing direction, not a label. It also occurs to me that "draw up" may sound very similar to "drop" when spoken and so you may have misheard "drop" as "draw up"