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If this area had been blank it would have been intentional.


Dec
18
comment Is there a term for being attracted to dead people?
Attracted in what way? How about historian, anthropologist? I realize these are not what you're after, but they, in some way, fit the criteria you've listed. Can you refine your criteria to get at what you are really interested in?
Dec
18
comment “We is who the Earth is for?”
Ok, she is speaking in a vernacular or dialect where it's common to make this kind of grammar "error". Note she also says, "Me and my daddy"
Dec
18
comment “We is who the Earth is for?”
I haven't seen the movie, but it may be possible that she is making a little joke by keeping the form of the question just asked. The question may have been, "Who is the Earth for?" and instead of saying, "The Earth is for us" she uses the same form and responds with, "We is who the Earth is for."
Dec
18
comment A single word meaning 'easy yet powerful'?
Fundamentally then, easy applies to the comment process and powerful to the images. The meaning you want is, 'Powerful, personalized images, easily. I don't think a single adjective can do that.
Dec
18
comment A single word meaning 'easy yet powerful'?
I imagine that a powerful image conveys a powerful message, but what does it mean for an image to be easy?
Dec
17
comment What's the word for “talking about the same thing but do not realize because using different words”
We typically call this being in violent agreement
Dec
17
comment Phrase for a guest enforcing their culture/rules on the hosts
One might describe Bob's behavior as being overzealous
Dec
17
answered Is there an expression similar to this Portuguese phrase?
Dec
17
comment What’s a “handegg”?
I thought handeggs were just the more expensive version of nesteggs- according to the old saying, "An egg in the hand is worth two in the nest."
Dec
17
comment What is the difference between “Whatever/What ever happened to Sandra?” and “What happened to Sandra?”
You may also want to add "What ever happened to Sandra?" to your question. Which is likely what you really want to know about.
Dec
17
comment Is “You ain’t seen nothin’ yet” a common or respectable English expression?
+1 but I think that double negatives are not incorrect in Standard English. They can be used to good effect to emphasize a contradictory statement in a way that a simple affirmative statement can't.
Dec
16
comment Respective: Lines connect a circle and two respective squares
Yes the way I read that suggestion I get two sets of shapes. Each of the two sets consists of a circle and two squares and each of the shapes is connected by lines to the shapes in the other set.
Dec
16
comment Respective: Lines connect a circle and two respective squares
A circle is connected by lines to two squares.
Dec
16
comment Another way to express “ignore the pain”
Jim stoically suffered in silence, thinking it was nothing.
Dec
16
comment Is “a row of” plural or singular?
There is only one row. The row contains "small pictures that allow..."
Dec
14
comment Is there a synonym for “day” that can go with “at night”, “at dusk”, “at dawn”?
You are essentially storing a series of characters. Why can't you store a series of characters that possibility include some spaces? Then you could store "at dawn" "at dusk" "during the day" etc.
Dec
14
comment What is a word for “Reason to Leave”?
As far as I know there is no single word that means exactly reason to leave. English doesn't have a single word for every concept imaginable; it often relies on combinations of words to describe specific ideas. You could say, "That was my reason." and rely on context to supply the what. I think a native speaker would typically just say, "That's why I left."
Dec
14
reviewed Approve What is a word for “Reason to Leave”?
Dec
12
comment the good guys and the bad guys
Viewers usually align themselves with the protagonist in which case you could say, "they're on our side." and that means the other guys are on the other side.
Dec
12
comment Better term than “off label” to describe something used other than as stated
Here's a picture of said milk label. The "official body responsible for certification" deems this suitable for cosmetic use only" therefore any other use (e.g., drinking) is "off-label." By both your and RoaringFish's definitions.