Reputation
24,623
Next privilege 25,000 Rep.
Access to site analytics
Badges
6 45 98
Impact
~2.0m people reached

18h
comment Correct usage of self-proclaimed and self-described?
To proclaim is to announce, to describe is just to state the pertinent attributes of.
1d
comment More formal phrase for “throw someone off”
I apologize, I was less than clear, what I intended to say was...
1d
comment “On holiday” vs “on the holiday”
But it is more idiomatic to say, “I go to the club on holidays” whenn meaning Whenever we get the day off from work I go to the club.
2d
comment take the stage “to” the chorus
You may be parsing it improperly: it’s [take the stage] [to the chorus of]
2d
comment The best words for a person who does not accept reality?
Please describe what it is you are looking for. Describe your particular situation in detail.
May
1
comment Embargo ___(prep.)
Do you mean FDR 's embargo on/of Japan?
Apr
30
comment What's the word for when someone is made to do something but another person does not have to?
Unfair, arbitrary, labor specialization? You’ll need to add some context and describe your scenario in particular.
Apr
27
comment the use of rob with cars
Because when your car was stolen it was you who were robbed, not your car.
Apr
27
comment Does “spiritual circumstances” mean “spiritual state/condition”?
Have you looked up circumstances in a dictionary?
Apr
26
comment How is this statement incorrect? or Is it correct?
One could also interpret since to mean because: *Because my father joined this post, he hasn’t taken any bribes (because otherwise he would have.)
Apr
25
comment Should questions phrased as declarations end with a question mark?
While not a duplicate question, the selected answer is applicable and implies the answer: english.stackexchange.com/q/138488/17956
Apr
24
comment Word for the result of shining a laser at something
That’s called a laser spot
Apr
24
comment What can you 'distort'?
You can distort anything that, physically, digitally or metaphorically can be changed in appearance by modifying the relative positions of its constituent elements.
Apr
24
comment Origins of the sports idiom “playing 500”, meaning same number of wins/losses
Ok I concede... However these examples are really having to do with real games that are not Baseball and so can’t really use batting. When used metaphorically, I think batting is much more idiomatic than playing.
Apr
24
comment Personification of a Vehicle and it's sleeves
Yeah, maybe wheel wells might work. But as HotLicks says, it's hard to know how many work get the reference.
Apr
24
comment How to use “resulting”?
Right so the "error in the statement" is either: 1. resulting should be results or 2. The last half of the sentence is missing.
Apr
24
comment How to use “resulting”?
But resulting can also be correct if the whole thing were to become a dependent clause: "An itch resulting [that results] when a nerve that can carry pain is only slightly stimulated, is different than a phantom itch experienced by some amputees."
Apr
24
comment Origins of the sports idiom “playing 500”, meaning same number of wins/losses
Note however that it's always "playing .500 ball" not just "playing .500" as OP asks about. There's a big difference.
Apr
23
comment Different way to say a common phrase
But be careful because thanks to can also be used sarcastically so you must make sure the context in which you use it allow the listener/reader to understand your intent.
Apr
23
comment Different way to say a common phrase
You only say “courtesy of” when whatever it is was done as a courtesy. If your friend have you a dress because she likes you it was probably not done as a courtesy. But you might try replacing courtesy of with thanks toI have this dress thanks to my dear friend Shadow.