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 Yearling
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2h
comment How would you write this sentence?
@Graffito- then he needs a couple of s's.
2h
comment using of word “manifest”
There is no rule that states all English sentences must use the minimum words required.
2h
comment using of word “manifest”
activated self identity?? I couldn't find this term in Google ngrams, and have no idea what you might mean by it. I suspect neither will your readers.
2h
comment How would you write this sentence?
If you want to be taxed now, money should go into a Roth (that uses after tax dollars) a traditional 401k is fed with pre-tax dollars and is taxed when withdrawn. You also need to consider what tax bracket you will be in then vs now.
2h
comment How would you write this sentence?
a traditional 401k, a Roth IRA.
2h
comment How would you write this sentence?
It's probably also "higher" tax rate not "larger" tax rate.
4h
comment In “thin green candle”, can these adjectives be considered cumulative?
An}if you wanted a thin-green candle you’d say that.
5h
comment Short human descriptions for logic's AND, OR and NOT
What’s wrong with and, or *** and *** not?
21h
comment Less formal way of saying “I'm going offline”
I’m goin’ into the subway, I’m prolly gonna lose you in a minute.
23h
comment Verb to be “I were a boy”
It’s “if I were a boy”. It’s a hypothetical question asking how things would be different being a boy instead of a girl.
1d
comment This is my, Tom, and Alex's poster which we made for last Monday's lesson
What is it you’re trying to say?
1d
awarded  Yearling
2d
comment English equivalent for “matrimonial bed”
@MichaelChirico - then in English you should use king size or queen size etc.
2d
comment Whether words like thou, thee, etc. from old English can be used by a poet or a fiction writer?
But you ought to learn to use them correctly. If used incorrectly. a reader may wonder about why they were used incorrectly and whether it was intentional or not.
2d
comment Whether words like thou, thee, etc. from old English can be used by a poet or a fiction writer?
If you are writing poetry. anything is possible. You are in complete control of your own writing.
2d
comment “'Please no entrance for ladies.'” vs … ladies'."
You are right. There is no definitive answer here. Only varying style guides. If you have no style guide with input on the matter, then if you like the American style, then use 1. (Or the sign actually had a period) Else if you think that quotes should only include exactly what is being quoted or you like the English style then use 2.
2d
comment The person whom to be accompanied? Or the person to accompany to?
None of them make sense. I assume the situation is that an employee must accompany all guests and that the employee’s name and id number must be entered next to the guest’s name. It is also unlikely that the guest will know the employee’s id number. Therefore, “Employees [that are] accompanying guests must enter their name and ID along with the guest’s name in the log book.”
2d
comment Is there a short, preferably monosyllabic, intransitive verb that means “to be absent”?
But it doesn’t fail to appear- it appears. Why do you need to mention “failing to appear” at all?
2d
comment Is there a short, preferably monosyllabic, intransitive verb that means “to be absent”?
@MichaelHardy - could you edit your question to include an example sentence with a blank for how you’d like to use this word?
2d
comment Is there an antonym for “capitalize” (as in letter-case)
@dauer - Thanks I edited to make remove confusion.