18,417 reputation
32679
bio website
location Phoenix, AZ
age
visits member for 2 years, 7 months
seen 2 mins ago

If this area had been blank it would have been intentional.


21h
awarded  Explainer
2d
comment Which is or are grammatically correct: “Cats are carnivores / carnivorous or carnivorous animals”?
@EdwinAshworth- That's true my dictionary gives two definitions- the first is about animals that eat meat, the second about plants. I don't think anyone's likely to try to apply def. 2 to a cat though.
2d
comment Good word for “framer” (not in the constitution sense)
One can be framed by someone who never appears in court or gives testimony of any kind. I could plant evidence at the crime scene when I was leaving that frames you, and if I did it right, nobody would ever come talk to me at all.
Sep
28
comment Should I use Well? or What?
No. Well as a question is used when you are waiting for an answer and you have not received one: Parent to a small boy: "What were you doing in the garage?" Small boy: <no response...> Parent: "Well? I'm waiting." IF you did not hear someone when they've addressed you, you can use (roughly in order of increasing politeness, and by no means an exhaustive list): "Huh?" "What?" "Come again" "Say again" "Could you repeat the question?" "Pardon me?"
Sep
28
answered Unique or different word for “challenging yet rewarding”
Sep
27
comment Shoplifting vs. a word for “someone who orders, eats and sneaks without paying the check”
@JoeBlow- Right, I understand that mouche is French for fly. But why did the OP choose to include this seemingly unrelated word in the question? OP obviously thought it was related. OP is obviously not French, because s/he uses the phrase "came across a French word" and since s/he gives the definition as "fly" and not "a person who eats and flies away" (for example). Rightly or wrongly I concluded that the only thing it could have in common is a pronunciation overlap. If you know why mouche is applicable to this question in a different way je suis tout ouïe
Sep
27
comment Which is or are grammatically correct: “Cats are carnivores / carnivorous or carnivorous animals”?
@Kris- waiting to pounce I see. That's why I said essentially. Obviously the 3rd admits to a cat being an animal while the 1st only implies it because a carnivore is an animal that eats meat. The second uses carnivorous which just attaches the qualities of being a carnivore to the cat. But all this is evident by the words that are present in each. There is no subtle hidden difference that a native speaker would perceive that a non-native speaker would miss. They are all quite straightforward in their meanings, which is: Cats eat meat.
Sep
27
comment Which is or are grammatically correct: “Cats are carnivores / carnivorous or carnivorous animals”?
They are all valid and essentially mean the same thing.
Sep
27
awarded  Good Answer
Sep
26
comment Should “you'd better” be changed while using reported speech?
But your last one could also be: "She told me I had better come earlier next time."
Sep
26
comment Opposite of “Save” with respect to saving in a list
Some UIs will show two columns one for "available" items and one for "Added" items with two buttons in between for moving selected items from one column to the other. Chris's Add/Remove works perfectly for this.
Sep
26
comment Verb for calling a phone only with the intention of letting it ring
With text messaging, this scheme is hardly ever needed anymore, but if I were going to tell someone that I was going to do this I'd say, "I'll call your phone and let it ring once and hang up. That'll mean <whatever>." Note that by saying "call your phone" and not "call you" it helps reinforce the idea that they should not answer it. I suppose you call call this a Single Bit Message (SBM). ;-)
Sep
26
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
26
comment Shoplifting vs. a word for “someone who orders, eats and sneaks without paying the check”
I like pie-jacker!
Sep
26
comment “pros and cons”, “black and white”, “ups and downs”. Always in a fixed sequence, is there a word or phrase for these?
An idiomatic collocation?
Sep
26
comment Shoplifting vs. a word for “someone who orders, eats and sneaks without paying the check”
You probably mean "mooch" which means to beg or contrive to be given something for free. It's not stealing though, because it's being given.
Sep
26
answered Shoplifting vs. a word for “someone who orders, eats and sneaks without paying the check”
Sep
26
comment What's a better way to say, “I'm a TV whore”?
I suspect that this usage derives from crack whore which implies that the person is so addicted that they will do anything to get more; just as a traditional whore will do anything for money, they will do anything for crack, and your friend will do anything for TV.
Sep
26
answered what is a single word for a quest or journey of self discovery
Sep
26
reviewed No Action Needed Is it grammatically correct to use “we” or “us” as well as the name of a group? e.g. “A meeting of we employees went very well.”