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comment modern equivalents of expressions, like “that's the way the cookie crumbles”
Why don’t you ask your younger family members? I don’t think the expressions you mention have lost their relevancy.
1d
comment I noticed vs I have noticed
@Avon Yes, exactly right.
1d
comment What word describes something that frequently switches between opposite states or views?
@Jason- yes, Ambivalent certainly doesn't work with things like the weather- it's for people/things that can think and have opinions. I don't think I'd use bipolar to describe the weather either. Weather is variable and ranges from one extreme to the other
1d
comment Word for something that is emotionally charged in a way that reduces the chances of approaching the subject from an objective point-of-view?
Yes, to me when you say that it is emotionally charged it means that any discussion will center on the emotion and thus not remain objective.
1d
comment Word for something that is emotionally charged in a way that reduces the chances of approaching the subject from an objective point-of-view?
You might consider these being touchy subjects
1d
comment Word for something that is emotionally charged in a way that reduces the chances of approaching the subject from an objective point-of-view?
What's wrong with emotionally charged?
1d
answered What is the name for the thing we search for?
2d
comment Confusion between:“{is/has} no chance” and “{is/has} no match”
First, is it match or chance? Is it trying to say that an angry rabbit can kill a snake? If so then "A snake has no chance against an angry rabbit." or "A snake is no match for an angry rabbit."
2d
comment what is the meaning of “dry up and blow away” in this sentences?
it's a metaphor- picture what happens to a leaf that falls from a tree. What happens to it after it falls? It dries up, becomes brittle and light, and eventually gets blown away by the wind.
2d
comment Can someone help me to understand this difficult sentence structure?
Think of it as two separate sentences whose meanings have been captured in a single one. 1. "The stability ... encouraged the transmission of the Black heritage..." 2. "The stability ... was crucial in substaining the Black heritage ..."
2d
comment what is the meaning of “dry up and blow away” in this sentences?
The message is, "How can something that can only dry up and blow away be a symbol of power?"
2d
comment Confusion between:“{is/has} no chance” and “{is/has} no match”
The choice of word depends on the meaning to be imparted. Do you wish to impart "is no chance" or "has no chance"?
2d
comment what is the meaning of “dry up and blow away” in this sentences?
What else can leaves that have been separated from their tree do?
2d
comment What to call words with permanent prefix, but no unprefixed form? (ex: nonchalant, untoward)
ling.upenn.edu/~beatrice/humor/how-i-met-my-wife.html
2d
answered What word describes something that frequently switches between opposite states or views?
2d
comment Why not “graduated from (institution)”?
Who says it's more prevalent?
2d
comment Proper use of “which” in a two-clause compound sentence
@FumbleFingers- The reason I say this is a restrictive clause is because in the system there must be many screens and the initial value is taken from the screen that is specified in the USING parameter. IF we interpret as a non-restrictive (initial value taken from the screen, which, by the way, is specified in the USING parameter) it makes no sense since there would be only one screen, the screen, and the USING parameter would be unnecessary.
Jun
26
comment Generic term for a thing that is versioned
@BrianHitchcock I heard that the Louvre is getting a new version of the Mona Lisa- the previous one was getting too old.
Jun
26
comment Proper use of “which” in a two-clause compound sentence
Well, while I'm not generally a prescriptivist, I do like the distinction that which and that provide. And because your clause is specifying the screen that the defaults are taken from it should use that not which. My rule of thumb is that if you can substitute which, by the way, in your sentence then which is the right word to use.
Jun
26
comment What is the specific word for a lost child whose guardians/parents are required to be located?
I've only ever seen the term lost child. (missing children have a different connotation- they are the ones with their picture on milk cartons) Lost children are recovered at the "lost children area" at whatever venue they were lost at: c8.alamy.com/comp/AEK73X/…, flickr.com/photos/sosalem/7511887170/in/album-72157630443109228, hong-kong-traveller.com/image-files/…