388 reputation
17
bio website tortoisewrath.com
location NE WA, US
age 15
visits member for 2 years, 2 months
seen Apr 7 at 2:02

Sep
12
comment How to pronounce GUID
@FumbleFingers we should pronounce Linux in Linus Torvalds's accent.
Sep
12
comment British pronunciation of “plait”
@Marthaª If you try to figure out why words are pronounced how they are, your brain will implode. The English town of Woolfardisworthy is pronounced "wools-ree".
Sep
11
comment A positive way to describe a know it all
@terdon Well, then you're clearly not erudite enough to be a Renaissance man of suggesting synonyms for very specific adjectives.
Sep
11
comment Data as a plural noun
@rhetorician Alumni are specifically male graduates; alumna can be either one female or multiple coed graduates. An alumnum would be a male or female graduate. Alumnae is always plural female graduates, never singular. Latin is weird.
Jul
14
comment Should there be a comma after “Thank you”?
Why so many downvotes on this one?
Jul
14
comment Last I checked, we put commas after appositive phrases
I feel as though "in the forest we ate cookies" requires a comma, as well. For example (this may be a bit of a stretch), "In the forest we ate cookies but died." could be parsed as "In the forest, we ate cookies, but [we] died" or "In the forest we ate, cookies [did nothing] but died [die]," though both options are somewhat odd semantically.
Jul
7
comment Last I checked, we put commas after appositive phrases
@CarlSmith Well, that's what I'm asking, so that is certainly worth something. ;-)
Jul
6
comment Last I checked, we put commas after appositive phrases
@tchrist "With introductory prepositional phrases yours, without commas [...]" Are you perhaps missing a couple words in there? I can't figure out how to parse this.
Jul
6
comment Last I checked, we put commas after appositive phrases
@tchrist 'Tis an appositive as I was taught the term. Feel free to correct.
Jul
6
comment May you please explain this?
@KateGregory - "Might you please pass the salt?" What dialect would that be?
Jul
6
comment May you please explain this?
What about could?
Dec
19
comment Pronunciation of OS X versions
@tchrist Would it be equally valid to say "person" instead of "Mac user" in that sentence? Most of the Mac users I know tend to be less programmer-y than the Windows/*nix users. Not that it really matters how obscure Darwin is.
Nov
6
comment Which term is correct — “Afghan” or “Afghani”?
Okay, my eyes are bleeding now, after reading the discussion here, what with its repeated use of the fgh consonant cluster.
Nov
6
comment Is there a word for a non-geek?
How much longer will it be until this site devolves into particularly-heated debates over the subtleties in the differences between nerds and geeks? I ask because that's happened on most other sites I visit...
Nov
6
comment Pronunciation of OS X versions
@Gnawme I would +1, but I reached my +1 limit for today. :(
Nov
6
comment Are the acronyms FYI, BTW, LOL, WTF now considered “normal” words?
Ahh... 2010. I remember that year. The English language was right then.
Nov
6
comment What is the correct way to pluralize an acronym?
A.T.M.'s looks weirder than A.T.M.s to me; of course, A.T.M. looks weird in the first place. Also, as @tchrist said, I have generally seen SOSes, etc.
Nov
6
comment Pronunciation of OS X versions
@tchrist Obscure in the sense that the average Mac user (of whom I know) won't understand it at first glance.
Nov
6
comment Pronunciation of OS X versions
Actually, it would have been most correct to say "exclusive non-Apple user." I'll gladly use *nix; I just don't happen to at the moment.
Nov
6
comment Pronunciation of OS X versions
@tchrist +1 for obscure OS history references.