388 reputation
18
bio website tortoisewrath.com
location NE WA, US
age 15
visits member for 2 years, 6 months
seen Jul 16 at 3:56

Nov
5
suggested suggested edit on Why is it correct to say “He came and said something to me” but not “He came and said to me something”?
Nov
5
comment How is SQL pronounced?
If I say "my-sequel," do I go to DLL hell?
Nov
4
revised Is this usage of 'for which' correct?
added 2 characters in body
Nov
4
comment Is this usage of 'for which' correct?
Ahh, sorry; didn't see the "with X" part. Updated.
Nov
4
comment Antonym for “Virgin”
Relevant?
Nov
4
comment American vs. British English: meaning of “One hundred and fifty”
As a hardcore American, I've never heard "and" used in the decimal point sense. We say "point." If someone said "one hundred and fifty," I would most definitely interpret that as 150, not 100.50; this goes for all contexts.
Nov
4
answered Is this usage of 'for which' correct?
Nov
4
awarded  Critic
Nov
4
answered “My hand is paining” or “my hand is hurting”
Feb
4
comment Is jargon proper English?
That still doesn't help with Microsoft, though. :)
Feb
4
comment Is jargon proper English?
@CamiloMartin Thinking back, I now realize that I was wrong about the cloud - it started out being synonymous with "the Internet," and then was restricted to the Web. Meanwhile, "Web 2.0" surfaced, referring to the creation of websites relying heavily upon user-generated content. As part of Web 2.0, "cloud computing" was soon invented, and it was very strictly defined as the use by individuals of online utilities to usefully manipulate data stored on a server. "Cloud computing" recently became a large part of the Web, and was thus merged to be the main use of the term "the cloud."
Feb
4
comment Is jargon proper English?
@CamiloMartin My issue with Apple is the fact that they charge ridiculous amounts for clearly inferior products: a $300 Android phone will have much better hardware than a $300 iPhone. All of their money comes from people who have had the formerly-true belief that Apple is the most wonderful thing in the world passed down to them, and if they were informed of the facts about Apple products, they would run screaming from all of them. However, Microsoft did do three things that really cook my chicken: Windows Vista, Internet Explorer, and "Office 2010 - Now with THE CLOUD!"
Feb
4
comment Is jargon proper English?
@DavidWallace Well, then, give me a definition of "the cloud" that is valid for use of the term in all corporations that use it. I will for "the web": a hypertext-based form of data transfer used on the Internet, powered by an amorphous network of servers and readily accessible by computer users using common Web browser software and typical Internet connections.
Feb
3
comment Is jargon proper English?
@DavidWallace I would say that it is different because the cloud isn't actually a thing.
Feb
3
comment Is jargon proper English?
@CamiloMartin Originally, the idea with the Cloud was not redundant storage, which became part of the Cloud because of evil marketers. The Cloud started out being limited exclusively to web-based services, like Google Docs, in which an online GUI serves as an interface to do useful things with the data; this concept is where it started before it morphed into a blob of all things Internet.
Feb
3
awarded  Commentator
Feb
3
comment Is jargon proper English?
(continued) I'm not against Microsoft here - I like Microsoft in general, and believe that Apple is the devil. It's just that that particular marketing tactic makes me quite angry.
Feb
3
comment Is jargon proper English?
@CamiloMartin What with "the Cloud," it started out as an actual thing: storing data on servers elsewhere and accessing it through web-based frameworks. This grew into something relatively undefined, which is what I would expect it to do, just as "the Internet." My problem in particular with what Microsoft is doing with it is that they are billing it as a tangible product: "We will sell you the CLOUD! Buy Office 2010 today!" Then, you buy Office 2010 and there's no button in your face that says "CLICK HERE FOR CLOUD," because the Cloud isn't a real thing.
Feb
3
comment Is jargon proper English?
@DavidWallace I'm not telling you you're not speaking English. The term "performant" is perfectly valid English, but I still wouldn't use it in general situations, because it's something that the average English speaker couldn't be reasonably expected to understand, in my opinion.
Feb
3
comment Is jargon proper English?
@BarrieEngland In my opinion, that usage seems archaic. It still sounds marketing-ish, and I would refrain from using it anyway, even if it is accepted by the OED.