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Apr
10
comment Why “interesting” is sometimes pronounced as “intra-sting”
@FumbleFingers: "Misleading" is your middle name.
Apr
10
comment Use of “relax” as noun
-But only as an INTRANSITIVE verb. A favorite item of Chinglish (I'm an ESL teacher) is to use it as a transitive verb, as in "After studying hard all day, I like to play basketball to relax myself."
Apr
9
comment Why “interesting” is sometimes pronounced as “intra-sting”
@FumbleFingers: Of course you don't understand, since you judge everything in a Malthusian manner (i.e., statistically). The phenomenon in question is actually a tautology: of course what remains in active use is both necessary and sufficient for that use. It depends on the domain, of course. Comparing casual speech and formal speech/written language is comparing apples and oranges. What is necessary and sufficient for these two will not coincide, of course.
Apr
9
comment Why “interesting” is sometimes pronounced as “intra-sting”
@FumbleFingers: No, it doesn't imply (or deny) that. I was merely referencing the result. It was you guessing as to the means of bringing about the result.
Apr
8
comment “Saving on the parrot's chocolate is futile”
The practice referred to verges on the foolish attempt to recover sunk costs.
Apr
8
comment A better way of expressing “burst like a soap bubble”?
"house of cards" also carries a whiff of an intent to deceive.
Apr
8
comment What does this sentence mean:“If you fail to dot an “I” or cross a “T,” you could be…”?
Related: the advice (to Americans) to be very careful in filling out their (federal) income tax forms, because "the IRS will drive a Sherman tank through a pin-hole".
Apr
8
comment What is noun to adjective conversion called?
Related: Is there a term for when the noun and adjective have greatly different forms, such as "dog" and "canine"?
Apr
7
comment Can “status quo” be used in regards to micro topics?
@ArmenTsirunyan: I've added a final paragraph to pin that down.
Apr
7
revised Can “status quo” be used in regards to micro topics?
added 223 characters in body
Apr
7
comment What is the antonym of 'quoin' — a single word to describe an interior angle
@Mitch: I thought of that before deciding to agree with it. I looked up the term "dihedral" in a mathematics dictionary (Penguin's), and it did not specify which of the two angles was meant, however, it is the convention that for two rays emanating from a common point, the "angle between them" is the smaller of the two angles, so I just scaled this up to the 3D case and went with the presumed convention that the smaller of the two angles was intended (which therefore means the interior angle, assuming, plausibly, that we're dealing with a convex structure).
Apr
7
comment A word for clothes, shoes, accessories?
Related: It is often handy to have a single word for otherwise dissimilar items sharing an important property, e.g., "fluid" for anything that flows, whether liquid or gas.
Apr
7
comment What's the difference between “niche” and “mainstream”?
Like Esperanto:)
Apr
7
comment Word to call a person that works in a store
I remember hearing "floorwalker" as a fairly general term for this, but it may be a dated term.