Reputation
1,924
Top tag
Next privilege 2,000 Rep.
Edit questions and answers
Badges
2 10 20
Impact
~442k people reached

Aug
19
revised Suggested alternatives for that horrible new noun 'nice-to-have'?
applied suggestion to OP's reference sentence
Aug
19
comment Suggested alternatives for that horrible new noun 'nice-to-have'?
For what it's worth, coming from an IT world, I don't find nice to have a horrible word at all - which may just be because I've been exposed to it for so long (it's not that new, by the way), but there you go.
Aug
19
answered Suggested alternatives for that horrible new noun 'nice-to-have'?
Jun
8
awarded  Nice Question
May
27
comment What word means “explicitly forbidden by the most fundamental laws”?
@user1717828: Ah, ok... my bad, not yours. Re-reading your question, my initial interpretation is clearly wrong.
May
27
comment What word means “explicitly forbidden by the most fundamental laws”?
@Hurkyl: True - and intentionally so. The OP's example specifically overcomes these huge odds, so it can't really have been fundamentally impossible, can it? ;-)
May
27
comment Why “go to the movies” and not “go to a movie”
@pazzo: if you'd read my answer, you might've noticed that I said it doesn't make much sense to word the question that way. One part ("do you ever") asks about habitual behaviour, the other makes it sound like you're talking about something specific. My point was that the indefinite part doesn't mix well with the definite part.
May
27
answered What word means “explicitly forbidden by the most fundamental laws”?
Feb
18
awarded  Popular Question
Feb
1
awarded  Yearling
Jan
1
comment Treacle is viscous; alcohol is ____?
Treacle is viscous; alcohol is vicious. Almost the same thing.
Dec
22
comment What does “fill-in-the-blank” mean in the following context?
@itsbruce: Why not offer your version as a different answer then, instead of +1'ing a comment and downvoting the only answer available? My interpretation is different, not wrong (I think). I suspect that FumbleFingers was correct and one's interpretation depends on where one is from, but there's nothing wrong with having an alternative answer, even long after the question has been asked. That way, people can upvote the answer they feel is right and over time, the "more common" one will win out.
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Jul
28
awarded  Good Answer
Jul
7
comment “Follow close behind” vs “follow closely behind”?
Interesting anecdote, but are you disagreeing with @tchrist's conclusion that "follow close behind" sounds better, or just with the reasoning that it sounds better because close can be used as an adverb?
Jul
7
comment “Follow close behind” vs “follow closely behind”?
+1 for the note on position/motion; a very good point (which my own dictionary neglected to make). Not quite sure what you mean by the stand closer to you example, though - obviously you wouldn't say "stand closerly to you" - nor by "including that one", since "follow closely behind" sounds ok (doesn't it?). Could you please clarify?
Jul
7
asked “Follow close behind” vs “follow closely behind”?
Jun
17
awarded  Constituent
Jun
17
awarded  Caucus
Feb
1
awarded  Yearling