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visits member for 3 years, 6 months
seen Mar 30 at 4:05

I am a native speaker of Japanese. I am neither a native speaker of English nor a linguist. Mah engrish not corecct allways. You have been warned.


Feb
6
awarded  Good Answer
Dec
12
awarded  Nice Question
Oct
19
awarded  Yearling
Sep
19
awarded  Notable Question
Aug
28
awarded  Popular Question
Mar
27
awarded  Popular Question
Nov
29
awarded  Popular Question
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17
awarded  Notable Question
Oct
19
awarded  Yearling
Aug
7
comment What is a word/phrase for using a term for a popular special case instead of a generic term?
You have to understand the difference between “A Xerox copier is a special case of a copier” (true) and “A Xerox copier is part of a copier” (false). Pars pro toto means the latter relation. Examples of parts of a copier are a feeder, a scanner, a printer, a toner, and so on.
Aug
7
awarded  Pundit
Apr
21
comment What is a word/phrase for using a term for a popular special case instead of a generic term?
If Xerox were part of a photocopier, then calling a photocopier “Xerox” would be a pars pro toto. But it is not. Xerox photocopiers is a special case of photocopiers, but the term pars pro toto does not refer to this relation.
Mar
29
awarded  Enlightened
Mar
29
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
21
comment “Which” or “where”?
@Em1: Now I see the logic behind this answer, but in that case, I would say something along "I am trying to determine where on Earth the gravity is the weakest."
Mar
20
comment “Which” or “where”?
I do not know the intent of the editor, but I prefer “where on Earth’s surface” to “where on Earth” at least, because “on Earth” sounds like an idiom as in “What on earth is happening here?!”
Mar
20
comment “Which” or “where”?
It sounds illogical to me. A place is not a gravity!
Jan
27
comment Why is WFM used for “working from home”?
@FumbleFingers: I think you have confused WFH and WFM in your comments, and that is the point. It seems that WFM is a common word, at least among software developers. Therefore, it is quite understandable that what Anguish Languish described happened in some of them between WFH and WFM.
Jan
25
comment Why is WFM used for “working from home”?
@FumbleFingers: I think that you have some misunderstanding about what this question is about. I can easily find some instances of “work from home (WFM)” on Google, and it is obvious that some people consider WFM stands for “work from home.” The question asks why they do. See also Anguish Languish’s comment. I do not know if that is a real story or not, but confusing the acronyms “wfh” and “wtf” is perfectly plausible even though no one uses “what the f**k” when they mean “work from home.”
Jan
25
comment Why is WFM used for “working from home”?
@FumbleFingers: What user3444 meant is that although “works for me (WFM)” has nothing to do with “work from home (WFH),” the two acronyms were conflated simply because WFM and WFH look similar. This explanation makes perfect sense to me, although I do not know if it is the truth or not.