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visits member for 2 years, 2 months
seen Dec 22 '13 at 2:35

Jan
24
awarded  Yearling
Jan
24
awarded  Yearling
Jul
2
comment An inoffensive word for “stupid”?
@nico They did in the comments of the question, "silly" works well too I suppose.
Jul
2
comment An inoffensive word for “stupid”?
@nico Naive having or showing a lack of experience, judgment. That seems to be what the OP is looking for.
Jul
2
comment An inoffensive word for “stupid”?
I agree that they could be used in a casual/flirtatious conversation, however the OP seems to be looking specifically for a way to tell the person they are stupid. Considering from the comments that the "stupid" person in question is already showing a lack of understanding of social conventions, they may not get the implication. If you add something like naive to your answer I would be more than happy to switch my vote. :)
Jul
2
comment An inoffensive word for “stupid”?
None of these mean stupid, or even close to it...
Jun
18
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Jun
15
awarded  Good Answer
Jun
15
comment Can itself be used for a group of people?
@FumbleFingers Pardon me, the next time I need some help with grammar I will defer to J.K. Rowling. You've convinced me. Bravo. SMH
Jun
14
comment Can itself be used for a group of people?
@FumbleFingers I guess you don't understand what I am trying to say. I am just saying that if you are going to try to learn proper grammar, don't go to a children's book for it. Every author breaks certain rules, and has small intricacies that make their writing style unique. It's part of what makes them great authors but if you're looking for a concrete example of how the "rules of grammar" should be applied to a given situation, don't look at a children's novel.
Jun
14
comment Can itself be used for a group of people?
@FumbleFingers I wasn't saying JKR is a bad writer or that she doesn't have a keen grasp of the English language, just that her books should not be your last stop when looking for proper grammar techniques.
Jun
14
comment Can itself be used for a group of people?
Not to take away from the Harry Potter books, but I would not use them as a reference for grammatical prowess.
Jun
12
awarded  Commentator
Jun
12
comment Meaning of “beaten to the punch”?
@JasperLoy to be fair Google customizes searches, so maybe Roflcoptr searches for egg recipes and fruit drinks a lot.
Jun
8
comment Straight quotes vs. curly quotes in formal writing
^ What he said...also @JAM you should just make that an answer.
Jun
8
awarded  Editor
Jun
8
comment What is the Tacoma Narrows bridge doing in this picture?
@mgb Edited to reflect the roll of flutter, though resonance still played its part (the best explanation is actually a combination of the two).
Jun
8
revised What is the Tacoma Narrows bridge doing in this picture?
added 615 characters in body
Jun
7
comment What is the Tacoma Narrows bridge doing in this picture?
@ArchJ Aeroelastic fluttering and resonance oscillation go hand in hand usually. They aren't normally disjoint occurrences.
Jun
7
comment What is the Tacoma Narrows bridge doing in this picture?
@LarsH I agree, however in this case fluffy is correct, they have the same meaning. In fact contortion defaults to contorted in many online dictionarys.