218 reputation
27
bio website mi.yodeya.com/users/883/…
location עולם הזה הגשמי
age
visits member for 2 years, 7 months
seen Jul 30 at 17:57

Image credit: @Aarthi
That grey circle is @casperOne's hand.


Jan
12
awarded  Popular Question
Feb
27
comment Opposite of “infinitesimal”
If you consult Wiktionary instead, you will see that you are using an informal usage of the word, and that technically, infinitesimal is actually the opposite of infinite.
Feb
27
comment Opposite of “infinitesimal”
Infinitesimal can be used as a noun for a mathematical concept, and then its opposite is indeed an infinity. Even when it is used as an adjective it can have this mathematical meaning. I'm not sure where your definition is from, I don't see it anywhere.
Jan
20
awarded  Yearling
Aug
6
awarded  Caucus
Aug
6
awarded  Constituent
Feb
8
comment Deriving nouns and adjectives from place names
Continued. 3) Terms becoming offensive may be a reason for why some are no longer used, but not for them never existing. That being said, yes, the evolution of language is a lot more complex than I have, intentionally, made it seem. Thank you for your answer, it gave me much to think about.
Feb
8
comment Deriving nouns and adjectives from place names
I'll address each paragraph in turn. 1) I fail to see how the name of a nation is not also the name of a place. 2) That is correct, 4-6 are nouns, but (correct me if I'm mistaken), 4 & 6 seem to be adjectival nouns. I asked why some are adjectival nouns and some are not. You give some good examples of other nouns, similar to "Englishman", but I'm not sure what you're adding. (By the way, actually, I believe in the plural we might say "they are Chinese". In the singular, however, you are correct, "he is from China".)
Jan
27
awarded  Student
Jan
27
asked Deriving nouns and adjectives from place names
Jan
26
revised Why “step into a car” but “step onto a plane”
added 281 characters in body; added 1 characters in body
Jan
26
revised Why “step into a car” but “step onto a plane”
edited body; added 188 characters in body
Jan
26
awarded  Editor
Jan
26
revised Why “step into a car” but “step onto a plane”
added 424 characters in body; added 70 characters in body
Jan
26
answered Why “step into a car” but “step onto a plane”
Jan
20
awarded  Critic
Jan
20
awarded  Teacher
Jan
20
answered Isn't this rude? Or am I wrong?
Jan
20
awarded  Supporter