894 reputation
21026
bio website linkedin.com/in/jaimesoto
location Orlando, FL
age 33
visits member for 4 years, 1 month
seen Oct 1 at 1:54

I develop terrain and structural modeling software tools for simulation and gaming.


Feb
8
comment Favourite untranslatables
@oosterwal: How dare I forget about y'all! I'm from Central Florida, which is in the South or just south of the South depending on who you ask.
Feb
2
comment Are there any examples of cross-language redundancy (e.g. “kielbasa sausage”)?
I have seen queso cheese used in the context of queso cheese sauce or queso cheese dip, meaning a sauce or a dip made with Mexican (or pseudo-Mexican, e.g. Monterey Jack) cheese.
Jan
10
comment Capitalization of User Interface Buttons
I found two related questions in the UI Q&A: Are there any studies that show the quickest mental processing for capitalization of header menu items for a website. (sic) and Is it correct to sometimes capitalize words mid-sentence in computer user interfaces?.
Jan
10
revised Are there any examples of cross-language redundancy (e.g. “kielbasa sausage”)?
Crossed-out chorizo sausage example, since it means a specific type of sausage in most of the Spanish-speaking world.
Jan
10
comment Are there any examples of cross-language redundancy (e.g. “kielbasa sausage”)?
@CesarGon: this is a good example of different definitions depending on the region. The definition of chorizo in my country of origin (Colombia) is less restrictive. According to Wikipedia: In Argentina, Uruguay and Colombia, chorizo is the name for any coarse meat sausage. Spanish-style chorizo is also available, and is distinguished by the name "chorizo español" ("Spanish chorizo"). Nevertheless, I think you are right since the interpretation of chorizo by English speakers possibly derives from Mexico or Spain.
Jan
7
comment Quote meaning: A wife is essential to great longevity
Here's a similar quote: Wives are young men's mistresses, companions for middle age, and old men's nurses. - Francis Bacon
Jan
6
accepted On being golden
Jan
6
comment Response when your boss thanks you
Glad to be of your service, my [ dear ] [ master | overlord | boss | commander | captain | ...]
Jan
6
asked On being golden
Jan
3
comment Are these phrases too posh-sounding for conversational English?
I don't speak German, but could those English posh words be cognates of their common German equivalents? I used many posh Latin-based terms (my native language is Spanish) when learning English because of my limited vocabulary.
Dec
11
awarded  Quorum
Dec
10
comment Does the quirky spelling in English actually make it easier to read?
An abrupt change of current English to anything else would probably make it more difficult to read just out of habit. Non-uniform spelling has allowed different pronunciations not only for short letter sequences but for entire words (e.g. all the how do you pronounce x? questions). On the other hand, a language like Spanish has a strong correlation between spelling and correct pronunciation (as defined by the Royal Spanish Academy). I wonder if romaji would make Japanese reading easier to someone with little exposure to the Latin alphabet or the Japanese spoken language.
Dec
10
comment Pronunciation of “Wiki”
I agree with @nohat: these are borrowed words, not mispronunciations. Should we consider the Spanish estándar for standard or the Japanese アイスクリーム (aisu kurīmu) for ice cream as mispronunciations of English?
Dec
10
accepted Are there any examples of cross-language redundancy (e.g. “kielbasa sausage”)?
Dec
10
accepted Foreign words reborrowed back into English
Dec
10
comment What are the important differences between Canadian and American (USA) English?
What are you talking aboot?
Dec
10
comment How do American dialects differ?
It is common to hear the 408, the 417, and the 528 in the Orlando area for the East-West Expressway, Greenway Expressway, and Beachline Expressway. However, it is awkward to hear the X for non-expressway state roads, U.S. roads, or interstates, e.g. the 50 instead of 50, the 17-92 instead of 17-92, or the 4 instead of I-4.
Dec
7
comment Are there any examples of cross-language redundancy (e.g. “kielbasa sausage”)?
What type of shirt is it? Is the chert portion derived from English?
Dec
3
comment Are there any examples of cross-language redundancy (e.g. “kielbasa sausage”)?
+1 For that great Wikipedia link.
Dec
3
comment Foreign words reborrowed back into English
Could someone with enough reputation please mark this question as a community wiki?