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Jan
21
comment Is it acceptable to nest parentheses?
I would say that separating content with parentheses is an attempt to provide content to the reader in a parallell scope. Using commas, would be a more serialized approach.
Jan
21
comment Is it acceptable to nest parentheses?
@T.Webster : If you have trouble keeping track of the parenthesis in a text you write, you should consider re-write. If the writer loose track, how should the reader be able to keep track?
Jan
22
comment A word that means to both encrypt and decrypt
As Jim say: "Cryptography" is a noun which is more likely to be a class name. Although you are asking for a word that means both "encrypt" and "decrypt", you are also saying that this is for naming a small class. So why not use "Cryptography" for the class?
Jun
5
comment Is there a word that describes seeing and hearing as one thing?
@Neil: Yes. I see it now.
Jun
5
comment Is there a word that describes seeing and hearing as one thing?
This also depends on how the OP intend to use it of course. Sometimes we need more context to be able to find the right expression.
Jun
5
comment Is there a word that describes seeing and hearing as one thing?
seeing and hearing are verbs. audiovisual is not. It is not easy to use it in the same way.
Aug
30
comment How was sexual intercourse referred to before 'sex'?
In the movie Mamma Mia‌​, Donna is reading from her mothers diary, where it is referred just as ..., in which Donna explains to her friends: "dot dot dot - That's when they 'did it' in the olden days".
Aug
26
comment When should I use “a” vs “an”?
@nohat: There is something called "y" sound, but most English words starting with "y" actually is pronounced more like the "j" sound. The English "y" sound is more like "aj", but is only pronounced like that when not in the beginning of a word, like in "why".
Jan
25
comment Meaning of “I am cold naked”
@박용현: I feel that many of your questions would be better off in the beta version of this new site: English Language Learners. This is still in private beta, but you can choose to follow it, so you will get notified when it is opened for public beta. When this happens, you can ask questions there in the same way you have done here, but in a site that is more suited for the questions you ask as a learner of english from a non-english perspective.
Jan
25
comment What does “X is not a four-letter word” mean?
@SamB: Using goto in computer programming is considered bad practice (and in modern programming languages well hidden or not possible). So this would by many programmers actually fall into the category of four letter word also in the meaning of being a swear word...
Jan
23
comment Intonation and the changing of meaning
@BillFranke: The question here is not whether this is a good example or not. It's about what the term is called for a phrase where the voice can convey meaning by means other than vocabulary and syntax. We understand what he's asking, so no need to "not agree".
Oct
29
comment Nested parentheticals — restructuring for clarity
@EdwinAshworth: You can upvote by clicking the up-arrow above the vote score to the left of the answer.
Oct
1
comment Does the washing up fairy exist outside of Australia?
@Paola: Well, yes. That is a well known phenomena, but is related only to laundry, not to washing up. In many cases, it is even not required to be put in the laundry basket, but more like left on the "magic floor" where clothes left at the floor is magically cleaned and put in place.
Oct
1
comment What is the origin of “shh”?
@neil: It is rather curious that this is used to urge someone to be silent, as the 's' and 'sh' sound is heard over most other spoken sounds. So it makes more sound to tell someone to be quiet than the original offence. In choirs, the singers are often told to dampen 's' sounds, and even not sing them at all (just leave it to one or two people).
Sep
6
comment On the usage of “etcetera”
@XavierVidalHernández: The three dots are often used when quoting a text, and you leave out a part of the original text that are not relevant in your context.
Aug
3
comment When did the term “Jay” come to mean an “unintelligent person”?
Your reference say: "Applied to humans in sense of "impertinent chatterer, flashy dresser" from 1620s." I would say this is not entirely the same as what is asked in the question. I would say it needs other answers for when this was taken further to mean "unintelligent person".
Jun
14
comment Difference in usage of “regular”, “usual”, “ordinary”, “normal”, “common”
@mfe: I would not use tap water. In many places tap water is not clean enough to drink, so sill water would be better (as in bottled water than comes from a clean source).
Jun
7
comment What is the Tacoma Narrows bridge doing in this picture?
@Mechanicalsnail: My thoughts excactly when I was reading the definition in this answer.
May
15
comment Is it acceptable to nest parentheses?
@T.Webster: Yes, that is exactly why you should use it with care as I said in my answer. A good advice would be to look quickly over what you have written, and see if it is easy to spot the matched parenthese pairs (without the aid of a programming IDE...).
Mar
27
comment “Your” vs. “you're”: Why the confusion?
@DanielHanly: I often have to read it twice when "you're" is misspelled as "your" because I the meaning of the two is in my head very different.